Out of Step: Witchcraft

 

It’s only the first few seconds which related to Gerald Gardner, but …

There’s a long form description of the contents of the full 25 minute show, which seems from the clip to be a lot of prurient sensationalism at the expense of those being talked to or about (including Gerald Gardner, Margaret Murray, Aleister Crowley, and Louis Wilkinson), which then from the long description actually devolves into not just exotification but also rapidly descends into ridiculousness as a proof of Godwin’s Law:

“Opening title sequence (62). In the studio Farson introduces the subject of witchcraft in contemporary Britain. GVs Castletown, Isle of Man. Farson, standing in the countryside near Castletown, introduces Dr Margaret Murray, aged 92, a leading authority on witchcraft. From her home Dr Murray talks about her experiences of, and views, on witchcraft. She says she has never met a witch but has seen one. This witch was credited with the ability to kill farm animals. Dr Murray does not believe this but believes that the witch could convince others of her powers. She receives letters from people who believe themselves bewitched. She tells them to have the courage to resist their beliefs. She speaks about covens. Dr Morris believes that in the past witches were forces for good – they were healers, midwives and herbalists. She speaks of wax images and how witches tried to kill King James Ist (456). Farson introduces Dr Gerald Gardner who lives in a ruined mill surrounded by relics of witchcraft. Dr Gardner is interviewed by the mill wheel. Dr Gardner says there are 400 witches in Britain and admits that he is a practising witch; witches do not worship the devil but have their own gods. He personally does not have any special powers but as a team he believes that witches can produce results. He gives an example of witches making a wax image to influence the result of a legal investigation. He says that the common belief that witches engage in sexual orgies is false but admits that they do dance naked and this is one reason why witchcraft is an undercover activity. He thinks witchcraft is a force for good and gives peace and joy to those who practise it (804). Farson speaks of Aleister Crowley (known as ‘the beast’), the last great witch in history. Still photographs of Crowley. It is alleged that he practised black magic and sexual debauchery. Farson introduces Louis Wilkinson, his executor, disciple, and lifelong friend. He speaks of Crowley as a friend and companion. He believes that Crowley had strong powers of suggestion and an extraordinary magnetic force. He gives an anecdote of Crowley addressing a man, Morton, in a New York restaurant and speaking of a dream he had about him. He speaks about Crowley’s funeral and how his funeral address involving a recitation on Pan was received. (1109). Film of black African natives, men and women, enacting a tribal dance to drums watched by a crowd of people (1146). Adolf Hitler addressing a large rally in Germany (1181). Young people dancing rock’n’roll. The voice-over [1109-1210ft] points out that people are susceptible to strong rhythms, hypnotic speech and mass hysteria which may not be far removed from witchcraft (1210). Credits (1244ft).” [via]

Still, it would be interesting to be able to see the whole show …