The Book of Baphomet

The Book of Baphomet by Julian Vayne & Nikki Wyrd, published by Mandrake of Oxford, was recently adapted as an Occult of Personality post at “Baphomet Unveiled“.

“The year is 1307 and The Poor Fellow-Soldiers of Christ and of the Temple of Solomon, better known as The Knights Templar, are about to get busted. An avalanche of accusations is made against the members of this powerful military Order who have been in the business of protecting Christian pilgrims in the Holy Land since 1129. Among these charges, brought against them by King Philip IV ‘the Fair’ of France, is that the Templars are idolaters. Their idol is a head, a cat, a many-faced form, a skull stuffed with grain… Whatever the details might be its name, though confessed by only a few, is Baphomet.”

“Any historian worth their discourse will explain that Baphomet (whichever of the variegated spellings we prefer) is simply the Infidel’s rendering of Muhammed. The irony that Islam, with its proscription against representation in religious art, should be the imagined origin of such idolatry raises a wry grin.

While this etymology for the name Baphomet is pretty much accepted in the academy, part of the delight of this entity is that it acts as a strange attractor around which many weird and wonderful notions coalesce.” [via]

“You hold in your hands the material result of many years’ hard craft. This Book contains some of the secrets of Life itself; or rather, the occult deity of Life on Earth, Baphomet. Horned, vital, beautiful, awe full, our aeons old Chaos Magick idol finds a name from the Knights’ Templar, then goes incognito through the Enlightenment (when flourished those great natural philosophers beloved of science historians), before emerging via devil worship and witchcraft into this era of Deep Ecology.

Darwin could have used a picture of Baphomet as his frontispiece, to demonstrate the one flesh from which all species originate. Contacting this Great Spirit, the anima mundi, allows access to a new way of ordering the world, with fresh visions of how and why we could Live. Here the authors weave strands from their lives into a rich tapestry of images, which might give you a pointer or two towards your own self-realisation, whilst amusing, entertaining, and instructing along the way.

Revolution, evolution, leap beyond the apocalypse to the Now!” [via]

The Book of Baphomet – First Official Trailer from julian vayne on Vimeo.

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