The Neteru of Kemet

The Neteru of Kemet: An Introduction by Tamara Siuda-Legan, from Eschaton, is part of the collection at the Reading Room. There is a newer reprint edition, than the one in the collection, available.

Tamara Siuda-Legan The Neteru of Kemet from Eschaton

“Three thousand years before the birth of Jesus Christ and perhaps even before, a civilization thrived on the banks of the Nile River in northern Africa that was called by its inhabitants Kemet (‘Black Land’). This land is known today by the Greek name Egypt. By virtue of extensive archaeological study, we know a great deal about this ancient culture which in some ways was more advanced than our own; a culture that embraced multiple expressions of Deity, provided fro social equality across race and gender, boasted a government and civil service to rival that of ancient China; and had remarkably practical religious philosophy.”

“Though there were more than 200 different rulers (both male and female), at least three major foreign occupations and many rewriting of ‘official’ history, philosophy and religious dogma, the faith of both the people and the priest(ess)hood of Kemet was highly celebratory and life-affirming. Though different Neteru were worshipped under different rulers and from place to place, They all has something in common: They were accessible to all and to each other, and Their worship covered every facet of life, from conception to death to rebirth and everything in between.”

“This workbook is intended as an adjunct to personal study and meditation on the Neteru, not as a total overview of the Kemetic religion. It is best used by someone who is either already familiar with the history and philosophy of Kemet or who is interested in learning of the Neteru and Their expression.”

“Meditative work with these Neteru can provide a sound introduction to the religion of Kemet, as all of Them are readily accessible to the sincere seeker. (An important note: ‘sincere’ in the Kemetic philosophy does not mean addressing Neter as an archetype or focus point of the Higher Self, known as the ka or ‘double.’ As in other indigenous African religions, Neteru are actual spiritual beings and do not respond favorably to New Age philosophy’s ‘I am God/ess’ arrogance.)” — from the Introduction