Omnium Gatherum: 11oct2020

An irregular hodgepodge of links gathered together … Omnium Gatherum for October 11, 2020

Here’s a variety of notable things I’ve recently found that you may also be interested in checking out:

  • Stoic Week 2020, Live Like a Stoic for a Week – Beginning Monday October 19th. Enroll in the free online course.
  • Portraits of Scottish witches revealed. The faces of six women tried and executed for witchcraft in a Scottish town have been brought to life once again in a series of portraits.”
  • Scenes from a Yazidi Refugee Camp, Circa 2016. Christina Lamb: ‘Everything seems to stop and spin. It is a vision of hell.'” From Our Bodies, Their Battlefields: War Through the Lives of Women [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher] by Christina Lamb—”From Christina Lamb, the coauthor of the bestselling I Am Malala and an award-winning journalist—an essential, groundbreaking examination of how women experience war.”
  • Louise Glück was announced as the 2020 recipient ofr the Nobel Prize in Literature. From “Persephone the Wanderer” in Averno [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher] by Louise Glück: “My soul / shattered with the strain / of trying to belong to earth— / What will you do, / when it is your turn in the field with the god?” From “Theory of Memory” in Faithful and Virtuous Night [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher]: “All the rest is hypothesis and dream.” From “Education of the Poet” in Proofs and Theories: Essays on Poetry [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher] “The only real exercise of will is negative: we have toward what we write the power of veto. It is a life dignified, I think, by yearning, not made serene by sensations of achievement. In the actual work, a discipline, a service. … the writer is the one who attends, who facilitates …”
  • The D. H. Lawrence We Forgot. Lawrence became famous writing novels about sex. But his best stories—and his most profound achievements—reside elsewhere.”—”What doomed Lawrence, in the long run, was not an accusation of phallocentrism but his elevation to the canon.” About The Bad Side of Books: Selected Essays of D.H. Lawrence [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher] by D H Lawrence, edited and introduced by Geoff Dyer—”You could describe D.H. Lawrence as the great multi-instrumentalist among the great writers of the twentieth century. He was a brilliant, endlessly controversial novelist who transformed, for better and for worse, the way we write about sex and emotions; he was a wonderful poet; he was an essayist of burning curiosity, expansive lyricism, odd humor, and radical intelligence, equaled, perhaps, only by Virginia Woolf. Here Geoff Dyer, one of the finest essayists of our day, draws on the whole range of Lawrence’s published essays to reintroduce him to a new generation of readers for whom the essay has become an important genre. We get Lawrence the book reviewer, writing about Death in Venice and welcoming Ernest Hemingway; Lawrence the travel writer, in Mexico and New Mexico and Italy; Lawrence the memoirist, depicting his strange sometime-friend Maurice Magnus; Lawrence the restless inquirer into the possibilities of the novel, writing about the novel and morality and addressing the question of why the novel matters; and, finally, the Lawrence who meditates on birdsong or the death of a porcupine in the Rocky Mountains. Dyer’s selection of Lawrence’s essays is a wonderful introduction to a fundamental, dazzling writer.”
  • Alex, I’ll Take RAW on the Grassy Knoll for 23—”RAW behind the picket fence at the Grassy Knoll, 1998. The above photo of Robert Anton Wilson, on the fabled Grassy Knoll, popped up on the Twitter a while back courtesy of Mustafa_al_Laylah …” That would, of course, be Hermetic Library Anthology Artist Mustafa al-Laylah.
  • Descendant of 17th century Freemason spy Fulke Greville has won a legal battle to reclaim a sword he claims was ‘stolen’ from his ancestor – which valued at £7million would make it the most expensive antique weapons in the world—”‘I have carried out decades of research on [Fulke Greville] and written in my book The Master of Shakespeare about how I believe he was in fact the true Bard,’ said Rene [Grenville], 73.” I’m confused about that book mentioned because it appear that the author of The Master of Shakespeare: Volume I; The Sonnets. [Amazon, Author] is A W L Saunders? But, anyhow, there it is. Maybe there’s another by Rene Grenville, but I can’t find it. Then again, the source is Daily Mail, so who knows?
  • Trapart Books is having a sale. “I just wanted to let you know that we’re having a sale right now and throughout this coming week. Most older titles are available at only 100:- SEK a copy – even some nice hardbound ones! If ever there was a time to splurge and spoil yourself, this is it.”—via email.
  • The Jewish Annotated Apocrypha [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher] edited by Jonathan Klawans and Lawrence M Wills. “First edition of the Apocrypha addressed to a Jewish audience in the English language. The first edition of the Apocrypha to include the book of Jubilees. The first stand-alone Oxford Study Apocrypha to include an Introduction, essays, and sidebars.” “The books of the Apocrypha were virtually all composed by Jewish writers in the Second Temple period. Excluded from the Hebrew Bible, these works were preserved by Christians. Yet no complete, standalone edition of these works has been produced in English with an emphasis on Jewish tradition or with an educated Jewish audience in mind. The JAA meets this need. The JAA differs from prior editions of the Apocrypha in a number of ways. First, as befits a Jewish Annotated Apocrypha, the volume excludes certain texts that are widely agreed to be of Christian origin. Second, it expands the scope of the volume to include Jubilees, an essential text for understanding ancient Judaism, and a book that merits inclusion in the volume by virtue of the fact that it was long considered part of the canon of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church (the text is also revered by Ethiopian Jews). Third, it has restructured the order of the books so that the sequencing follows the logic that governs the order of the books in the Jewish canon (Law, History, Prophecy, Wisdom and Poetry). Each book of the Apocrypha is annotated by a recognized expert in the study of ancient Judaism. An Introduction by the editors guides readers though the making of the volume and its contents. Thematic essays by an impressive array of scholars provide helpful contexts, backgrounds and elaborations on key themes.”
  • From Marking Time: An Excerpt” From Marking Time: Art in the Age of Mass Incarceration [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher] by Nicole R Fleetwood—”A powerful document of the inner lives and creative visions of men and women rendered invisible by America’s prison system.”
  • This Photographer Poignantly Explored The Depths Of Humanity. Mary Ellen Mark’s legacy is clear in The Book of Everything.” About Mary Ellen Mark: The Book of Everything [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher] with text by Martin Bell and photography by Mary Ellen Mark—”Conceived and edited by film director Martin Bell, Mary Ellen Mark’s husband and collaborator for over 30 years, The Book of Everything celebrates in over 600 images and diverse texts Mark’s extraordinary life, work and vision. From 1963 to her death in 2015, Mark told brilliant, intimate, provocative stories of remarkable characters whom she would meet and then engage with–often in perpetuity. There was nothing casual or unprepared about Mark’s approach; she unfailingly empathized with the people and places she photographed. For this comprehensive book Bell has selected images from Mark’s thousands of contact sheets and chromes–from over two million frames in total. These include her own now-iconic choices, those published once and since lost in time, as well as some of her as-yet-unpublished preferences. Bell complements these with a few selections of his own. Along with Mark’s photos made in compelling, often tragic circumstances, The Book of Everything includes recollections from friends, colleagues and many of those she photographed. Mark’s own thoughts reveal doubts and insecurities, her ideas about the individuals and topics she photographed, as well as the challenges of the business of photography.”
  • Kafka in Pieces. A new collection defamiliarizes the author we think we know.” About The Lost Writings [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher] by Franz Kafka, translated by Michael Hofmann.
  • I Saw the Sign. On the myth-making and protest of political signage.” About Political Sign [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher] by Tobias Carroll, part of the Object Lessons series—”Object Lessons is a series of short, beautifully designed books about the hidden lives of ordinary things. In an election year, political signs can be impossible to avoid. They’re in front yards, on bumper stickers, and in some places you might never have expected. Tobias Carroll chronicles the permutations and secret histories of political signs, venturing into the story of how they came to be and illuminating how the signs around us shape us in ways we often fail to appreciate. In an era of political polarization and heated debate, what can be learned from studying how our personal space becomes the setting for both? Understanding political signs can help us understand our current political moment, and how we might transcend it. Object Lessons is published in partnership with an essay series in The Atlantic.”
  • Monstrous Offspring.” About The Imposteress Rabbit Breeder: Mary Toft and 18th-Century England [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher] by Karen Harvey—”In October 1726, newspapers began reporting a remarkable event. In the town of Godalming in Surrey, a woman called Mary Toft had started to give birth to rabbits. Several leading doctors – some sent directly by King George I – travelled to examine the woman and she was moved to London to be closer to them. By December, she had been accused of fraud and taken into custody. Mary Toft’s unusual deliveries caused a media sensation. Her rabbit births were a test case for doctors trying to further their knowledge about the processes of reproduction and pregnancy. The rabbit births prompted not just public curiosity and scientific investigation, but also a vicious backlash.”
  • More about this: The Anti-Social Novelist. A celebrated chronicler of human suffering, John Steinbeck could not abide other people.” About Mad at the World: A Life of John Steinbeck [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher] by William Souder, due out in a few days—”Steinbeck remains our great social realist novelist, the writer who gave the dispossessed and the disenfranchised a voice in American life and letters. Eloquent, nuanced, and deeply researched, Mad at the World captures the full measure of the man and his work.”
  • Why read Boethius today? Written while awaiting execution, the Consolation of Philosophy poses questions about human reason that remain urgent today.” About The Consolation of Philosophy by Boethius, various editions, including Oxford World’s Classics [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher] or Penguin Classics [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher].
  • Against Translation and the Ethics of Compassion.” New review about Alan Shapiro’s 2019 Against Translation [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher]—”We often ask ourselves what gets lost in translation—not just between languages, but in the everyday trade-offs between what we experience and what we are able to say about it. But the visionary poems of this collection invite us to consider: what is loss, in translation? Writing at the limits of language—where ‘the signs loosen, fray, and drift’—Alan Shapiro probes the startling complexity of how we confront absence and the ephemeral, the heartbreak of what once wasn’t yet and now is no longer, of what (like racial prejudice and historical atrocity) is omnipresent and elusive. Through poems that are fine-grained and often quiet, Shapiro tells of subtle bereavements: a young boy is shamed for the first time for looking “girly”; an ailing old man struggles to visit his wife in a nursing home; or a woman dying of cancer watches her friends enjoy themselves in her absence. Throughout, this collection traverses rather than condemns the imperfect language of loss—moving against the current in the direction of the utterly ineffable.”
  • Prince. The Purple One’s Sign O’ the Times gets an expanded-edition reissue.” About Sign O The Times (Super Deluxe Edition) by Prince, which includes CDs, DVD and book.
  • Prince Was One of the Loneliest Souls I’ve Ever Met.” From This Thing Called Life: Prince’s Odyssey, On and Off the Record [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher] by Neal Karlen—”A warm and surprisingly real-life biography, featuring never-before-seen photos, of one of rock’s greatest talents: Prince.”
  • Alphonse Mucha et Son Oeuvre—”This short study of Mucha’s career was published in 1897 when the Nouveau style was becoming a dominant trend in Continental Europe, thanks in part to the promotion of art journals like La Plume, as well as to Mucha himself. The reproductions are all monochrome halftones but they include many sketches, illustrations and smaller works that are either never seen elsewhere or are marginalised by his advertising graphics and the designs for Sarah Bernhardt.”
  • Seeing with Fresh Eyes: Meaning, Space, Data, Truth by Edward Tufte, on presale, due in a few days. This is a new book in a series of books, that are certainly interesting, but are a bit more marketing than information. I’ve got all the previous ones for reasons. I’m not super compelled to get this one, or attend another of his marketing pitch, er, I mean one-day course; although it’s now online instead of in person. I got in cheap because I was enrolled in grad school, but attending the course gets you all five books. “The one-day online course will be open for sign-ups in mid-October, 2020.” “323,000 people from 1994 to 2020 attended continuously changing live versions of the ET course Presenting Data and Information. But now we have an online course video. This course can be viewed anytime, and students receive all 5 ET books in advance by mail — for study hall and reading during the course. The online video is closely keyed to the books, with short reading throughout the course.”
  • The Rigidity of Caste” More about Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher] by Isabel Wilkerson—”The Pulitzer Prize–winning, bestselling author of The Warmth of Other Suns examines the unspoken caste system that has shaped America and shows how our lives today are still defined by a hierarchy of human divisions.”
  • https://psyche.co/amp/ideas/in-a-pandemic-we-learn-again-what-sartre-meant-by-being-free—”Sartre’s core insight was that it is only when we are physically stopped from acting that we fully realise the true extent and nature of our freedom. If he is right, then the pandemic is an opportunity to relearn what it means to be free.”
  • Sherlock Holmes – The Spider’s Web [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher] by Philip Purser-Hallard—”Sherlock Holmes meets Oscar Wilde in this brand-new mystery inspired by The Importance of Being Earnest.” “Holmes and Watson rush to the scene, but are shocked by the flippant attitude of the ball’s host: the wealthy Ernest Moncrieff, a favourite of high society who was found in a handbag as a baby. Suspicion naturally falls upon the party guests, but the Moncrieff family and their friends – including the indomitable Lady Bracknell – are more concerned with the inconvenience of the investigation than the fact that one of them may have committed murder. But behind the superficial façade, Holmes and Watson uncover family secrets going back decades, and a mysterious blackmailer pulling the strings…”
  • Chernobyl: A Stalkers’ Guide [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher] by Darmon Richter edited by Damon Murray and Stephen Sorrell, due later this month—”In Chernobyl: A Stalkers’ Guide, researcher Darmon Richter journeys into the contemporary Exclusion Zone, venturing deeper than any previously published account. While thousands of foreign visitors congregate around a handful of curated sites, beyond the tourist hotspots lies a wild and mysterious land the size of a small country. In the forests of Chernobyl, historic village settlements and Soviet-era utopianism have lain abandoned since the time of the disaster – overshadowed by vast, unearthly mega-structures designed to win the Cold War. Richter combines photographs of discoveries made during his numerous visits to the Zone with the voices of those who witnessed history – engineers, scientists, police and evacuees. He explores evacuated regions in both Ukraine and Belarus, finding forgotten ghost towns and Soviet monuments lost deep in irradiated forests. He gains exclusive access inside the most secure areas of the power plant itself, and joins the ‘stalkers’ of Chernobyl as he sets out on a high-stakes illegal hike to the heart of the Exclusion Zone.”
  • A Defiant Manifesto for ‘Glitch Feminism’” About Glitch Feminism: A Manifesto [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher] by Legacy Russell—”A new manifesto for cyberfeminism. Simone de Beauvoir said, “One is not born, but rather becomes, a woman.” The glitch announces: One is not born, but rather becomes, a body. The divide between the digital and the real world no longer exists: we are connected all the time. What must we do to work out who we are, and where we belong? How do we find the space to grow, unite and confront the systems of oppression? This conflict can be found in the fissures between the body, gender and identity. Too often, the glitch is considered a mistake, a faulty overlaying, a bug in the system; in contrast, Russell compels us to find liberation here. In a radical call to arms, Legacy Russell argues that we need to embrace the glitch in order to break down the binaries and limitations that define gender, race, sexuality. Glitch Feminism is a vital new chapter in cyberfeminism, one that explores the relationship between gender, technology and identity. In an urgent manifesto, Russell reveals the many ways that the glitch performs and transforms: how it refuses, throws shade, ghosts, encrypt, mobilises and survives. Developing the argument through memoir, art and critical theory, Russell also looks at the work of contemporary artists who travel through the glitch in their work. Timely and provocative, Glitch Feminism shows how an error can be a revolution.”
  • A 540 million year-old microscopic protist sex mystery is solved. How tiny, shelled protists reproduce helps explain their strange evolutionary patterns.”
  • NASA’s OSIRIS-REx Unlocks More Secrets from Asteroid Bennu.”Also tweet—”The @OSIRISREx mission hits the jackpot in its science goals! Results published today reveal asteroid Bennu contains well-preserved organic materials. This means it’s likely the sample we collect can tell us about the origins of life in our solar system.”
  • High-capacity tape for the era of big data. A new magnetic material and recording process can vastly increase data capacity.” Next we’ll be figuring out how to make punch cards with high density data!
  • There’s a gene for detecting that fishy smell, olfactory GWAS shows—”In the smell tests, people with a particular variant of this gene were more likely to not smell anything when presented with the fish odor or to use descriptors for it that were neutral or positive and not seafood related, such as ‘potatoes,’ ‘caramel,’ and ‘rose.’ The findings are the first to show an important role for this gene in people, the researchers say.”
  • Wheat gluten can be used to make sustainable diaper material
  • Stone Age people in Ireland had dark skin and were lactose-intolerant
  • How Racial Bias in Tech Has Developed the “New Jim Code”
  • Facebook Just Forced Its Most Powerful Critics Offline. ‘Nothing says ‘free speech’ quite as much as a multibillion-dollar corporation with a global monopoly getting its critics shut down.'”
  • The Coronavirus Unveiled: Microscopic Images of SARS-CoV-2. Scientists around the world have captured detailed images of the coronavirus.”
  • A common plant virus is an unlikely ally in the war on cancer. Promising results from injecting dog and mouse tumors with the cowpea mosaic virus.”
  • More about Linux as Windows kernel, maybe Windows 11, or, perhaps, converting that from binary, Windows 3. “Could Microsoft be en route to dumping Windows in favor of Linux? Microsoft Linux is the next evolution of the Microsoft desktop operating system, argues Jack Wallen. He explains why this would be a win-win for Microsoft, IT pros, users, and the Linux community.” I mean, I switched from Linux to Mac OS X (née NeXTstep/OpenStep), and I never, ever, thought I’d say I’d actually consider switching to Windows, but … if, and only if, I’d be sorely tempted!
  • Cory Doctorow: ‘Technologists have failed to listen to non-technologists’. The tech activist on his new sci-fi novel and why we mustn’t treat the moral downsides of social media as a necessary evil.”
  • Horseshoe crab blood key to COVID-19 vaccine despite negative impact it could have on ecosystem. An estimated 50,000 of them die in the [vaccine] process and human interference also means that the species is now vulnerable to extinction.”
  • A Popular Online Learning Platform Was Actually Created by an Underground Religious ‘Cult’. The creator of Acellus and the ’cult’s leader has been accused of violence and abuse.”
  • Some planets may be better for life than Earth.” Sung to the tune of https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wJVpihgwE18 by The Animals.
  • Yeah, not the 19th century Golden Dawn, but the Greek neo-nazi group that has screwed with search engine results, among other crimes. “Goodnight Golden Dawn“—”Today is a day that will go down in history. The judges declared that the Greek neo-Nazi group Golden Dawn is a criminal organisation, in what has been described as one of the most important trials against a fascist organisation since World War Two.”
  • Federal Agents Used Toxic Chemical Smoke Grenades in Portland Portland protesters report severe and lasting side effects from the chemical weapons used during Trump’s ‘Operation Diligent Valor.'” Also “Human Rights Group Finds Portland Police Violated UN Guidelines During Protests.”
  • Amy Coney Barrett initially failed to disclose talks on Roe v. Wade hosted by anti-abortion groups on Senate paperwork.” Also tweet—”We found that video for that lecture was advertised by the school as being available on YouTube. But the video was removed by the user in 2014. Of 11 lectures publicized as available to watch on the school’s event, only Barrett’s was removed.”
  • The Swamp That Trump Built. A businessman-president transplanted favor-seeking in Washington to his family’s hotels and resorts — and earned millions as a gatekeeper to his own administration.”
  • Trump Lashes Out at His Cabinet With Calls to Indict Political Rivals. The pressure on his top administration officials to take action came as President Trump bristled at the restraints of his illness.” Also watch Trump Unmoored Calls For Indictment Of His Political Opponents.” Also “Trump Won’t Debate Unless There’s a Risk of Infecting Biden.” Also “Trump Makes First Public Appearance Since Leaving Walter Reed. The president continued to play down the threat of the virus, but the event that the White House had previewed as a huge “peaceful protest for law and order” was uncharacteristically brief.” Also tweet—”One idea Trump considered while still at Walter Reed was wearing a Superman T-shirt under his dress shirt as he left the hospital.” Also tweet—”My God, the memes on this… they’ll never end.”
  • Tweet—”TIME’s new cover: Patient zero and the White House coronavirus outbreak.” Get it as a poster: Trump Covid White House
  • Tweet—”These people had thousands of dollars For night vision goggles, 800,000 volt stunguns and bomb materials. One of their ‘beefs’ with the Governor was her refusal to open gyms. There’s a confederate flag in the yard. Their economic status is NOT what radicalized them” Also tweet—”Anyone who uses GYMS being closed as a justifiable reason to kidnap a governor isn’t radicalized Bc they’re poor. They’re looking for an excuse to be terrorists.” Also tweet—”Today’s a good day to remember the Wilmington Massacre, a violent coup which destroyed a democratically-elected state gov’t and replaced it with anti-democratic white supremacy, thus ushering in the beginnings of Jim Crow.” See Wilmington insurrection of 1898. Also tweet thread—”You have no idea what you’re on about.”
  • A Communism of Feelings—”What would a leftist movement built of feelings look like?” About the Verso re-issue of The Romance of American Communism [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher] by Vivian Gornick.
  • The Buzziest Memes of the Mike Pence Fly Incident.” Also tweet—”If the fly laid eggs in his hair, he’s required to carry them to term. His rules, not mine.” TFW the fly lands on the politician’s head and my brain helpfully begins playing bits from both John Carpenter’s Prince of Darkness and Amityville Horror soundtracks. I mean: the fly, the eye. That’s totally the point in the movie when the music cues to reveal that’s actually an entity wearing a human suit, right? Also tweet—”So, I wrote my doctoral dissertation on monsters. The word comes from monstrum, meaning a divine omen or wonder. It’s the same root that gives us demonstrate, meaning to point out, prove, establish. Like to establish that a political administration is incompetent.” Also “Mike Pence – Evil Wizard?
  • QAnon High Priest Was Just Trolling Away as a Citigroup Tech Executive
  • Peloton removed QAnon hashtags from its platform as tech companies grapple with the conspiracy theory movement
  • Just a reminder: public WiFi access hotspots are an absolute security trash fire. Always have been. Always use a VPN, away from home, and, stay on a cellular network. In case you needed a reminder, FBI Internet Crime Complaint Center announces “A Covid 19-Driven Increase in Telework From Hotels Could Pose A Cyber Security Risk for Guests
  • America’s Top Science Journal Has Had It With Trump. The editor of Science has abandoned staid academic-speak to take on falsehoods in the White House—decorum be damned.” See Dying in a Leadership Vacuum.
  • American Alliance of Museums Denounces Trump’s Delay of Pandemic Relief Negotiations. Laura Lott, president and CEO of the organization, criticized the administration’s decision to forego a new relief package until after the election.”
  • Pandemic ‘Profiteers’: Why Billionaires Are Getting Richer During An Economic Crisis—”Excess” profits during wartime have been subject to tax at several points in American history. Writer Anand Giridharadas argues we are at similar point today as billionaire wealth has continued to grow in spite of the pandemic. He is the author of Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World.
  • Visit NIVA National Independent Venue Association on YouTube. Watch the trailer. Also Seth [Meyers] Promotes NIVA’s Save Our Stages Fest
  • Tweet—”The goal is not simply anti-racism…”
  • A World on Fire: Fatima Bhutto on Surviving Crisis
  • Centuries Ago, They were Facetuning, Filtering and Catfishing Too
  • 1,200-year-old pagan temple to Thor and Odin unearthed in Norway

  • Study finds that right-wing authoritarians aren’t very funny people.”
  • Toxic Masculinity for the Toxic Masculinity Throne! “Coronavirus Safety Runs Into a Stubborn Barrier: Masculinity. When political leaders suggest basic precautions appear unmanly, men are less likely to follow health and safety advice, experts say.” See instead “An antidote to toxic masculinity: the moss bros of TikTok.”
  • Neil Gaiman & Stephen King come out swinging with forceful pushback to J.K. Rowling’s transphobia. ‘Your pronouns matter. You matter. You are loved.'”—”‘We are writers, editors, journalists, agents, and professionals in multiple forms of publishing,’ they wrote in a statement. ‘We believe in the power of words. We want to do our part to help shape the curve of history toward justice and fairness.'” Also—”This is a letter of support for the trans and non-binary community from publishing professionals of the United States and Canada. It is a companion to the letter that was signed last week in the UK.” Also “More than 200 writers and publishers sign letter in support of trans and non-binary people. Described as ‘a message of love and solidarity’ and with signatories including Jeanette Winterson and Malorie Blackman, it comes days after a host of prominent literary names signed a letter defending JK Rowling.” Also “A Message from Members of the UK and Irish Publishing Community. We stand in support of trans and non-binary people and their rights.” And, as an aside, imma just leave this here: in the Harry Potter books, the entire island of Ireland, including the Republic, is under the jurisdiction of the English Ministry of Magic, so Rowling’s a damned TERF and feckin’ Unionist.
  • Irish Unity: Dream or Reality?—”The great Irish poet laureate William Butler Yeats once remarked that ‘There is another world, but it is in this one.'” Hermetic Library Figure William Butler Yeats.
  • More about Yeats, in passing: Public Enemy has a new album, and the time could not be more right—”[Carla] Bruni has a poet’s eye for detail — on 2007′s No Promises, she turned texts by Emily Dickinson, William Butler Yeats, and others into surprisingly successful songs — and these new songs are brief, focused but layered.”
  • Tweet thread—”I literally PRE WROTE a tweet thread about Lief Erikson day and how we need to stop celebrating columbus day and now Trump has come out and is promoting LE day as a “white pride” dog whistle. All of Twitter is mad about it and I’m stuck in the middle. Not a fan.”
  • Recycling was a lie — a big lie — to sell more plastic, industry experts say. Less than 10 per cent of the plastics we’ve used have been recycled. A new documentary reveals why.” About “Plastic Wars. Did the plastics industry use the lure of recycling to sell even more plastic? A look at the mounting crisis of plastic waste in the environment.”
  • You had me at talking cat. “French Exit doesn’t quite know what to do with its talking cat. The film is Michelle Pfeiffer’s show.”— “The supernatural thread of the story is slowly teased out as the family settles in France. Small Frank goes missing, prompting Frances to hire a clairvoyant who previously saw Small Frank for what he was. She then serves as their gateway to communicate with Frank via seance, at which point Letts’ disembodied voice converses with the gathered characters about everything from family history to his discomfort with fleas.” About French Exit, dir by Azazel Jacobs, with Michelle Pfeiffer and Lucas Hedges; based on the book French Exit [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher] by Patrick DeWitt—”From bestselling author Patrick deWitt, a brilliant and darkly comic novel about a wealthy widow and her adult son who flee New York for Paris in the wake of scandal and financial disintegration.” Also “‘French Exit’ Film Review: Michelle Pfeiffer Brings Life to Eccentric Black Comedy. NYFF 2020: Pfeiffer and Lucas Hedges star in Azazel Jacobs film that undercuts its polished stateliness with quiet dark humor.” Also “‘French Exit’ With Michelle Pfeiffer, Lucas Hedges to Close New York Film Festival.”
  • Why Are the Noses Broken on Egyptian Statues?
  • Fungi, Folklore, and Fairyland. From fairy-rings to Lewis Carroll’s Alice, mushrooms have long been entwined with the supernatural in art and literature. What might this say about past knowledge of hallucinogenic fungi? Mike Jay looks at early reports of mushroom-induced trips and how one species in particular became established as a stock motif of Victorian fairyland.”
  • Why the hidden world of fungi is essential to life on Earth. Fungi have long supported and enriched life on our planet. They must be protected as fiercely as animals and plants.” Merlin Sheldrake is a biologist and author of Entangled Life: How Fungi Make Our Worlds, Change Our Minds, and Shape Our Futures [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher].
  • Lost stash of 400 erotic drawings by Duncan Grant comes to light. Explicit works by 20th-century gay artist were secretly passed from lover to lover for decades.”
  • Watch https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=udhDawfCLHo, Copaganda: Episode 1—”Cops are in the news and American society is rethinking its relationship to the police. But where does our image of what the police are come from? How did early TV create the template for ‘copaganda?'”
  • Captain (isn’t it Admiral now?) Janeway’s computer-animated series of adventures is the new Sarah Jane Adventures! “Kate Mulgrew returning as Capt. Janeway in Star Trek: Prodigy. Now all we need is a Prodigy / Picard crossover to reunite her with Seven.” Does anybody else in here remember Ms Columbo?
  • More about this: “Netflix’s Haunting of Bly Manor is a puzzle box disguised as a ghost story. The follow-up to Hill House goes in a different direction.”
  • And, more about this: “The Good Lord Bird is a timely reminder that Americans aren’t usually fans of progress. Ethan Hawke’s take on abolitionist John Brown’s story is dazzling and disconcerting.”
  • Maybe they’ll have to switch to Pantone Period red? “Why Are All Swedish Cottages Painted Red? One company has exclusive rights to the source of the iconic pigment—a copper mine’s supply of iron deposits that may last just a century more.”
  • I tried watching The Swamp Thing on CW now that the first episode streaming free, and I think I would have liked it, except I shut it off the second there were two censored lines of dialogue where they cut the sound AND blurred the actor’s mouth. Fuck that noise. Er, I mean: fork that silence. But, maybe check it out some other way. Or, just (re-)read the Alan Moore run. (Also, I notice, now finally and entirely available digitally via Hoopla through your local library system!)
  • Watch the new trap remix of Dionysus by BTS from the Map of the Soul ON:E concert at Tweet. “Just get drunk like Dionysus / Drink in one hand, Thyrsus on the other / Art splashing inside this clear crystal cup / Art is alcohol too, if you can drink it, you’ll get drunk fool / You dunno you dunno / You dunno what to do with / I’ll show you I recommend you something different / From my mic made of ivy and rough wood / There is never a sound that comes out in one breath” “Until the sun comes up, where the party at / Until we fall asleep, where the party at / Sing it, sing it again / Drink it, drink it again / We’re born again” Also “K-pop titan BTS’s online concert draws global fans.”
  • Theses on Doomscrolling
  • Tweet—”Belphegor loves a game of Jenga.”
  • Priest arrested for having threesome with corset-wearing dominatrices on church altar—”The witness took video footage of the unholy trinity, then called police.” “Dixon, who is also an adult film actress, had posted on social media a day prior that she was traveling to the New Orleans area to meet up with another dominatrix to ‘defile a house of God.'” Attack and dethrone god! Also “Sex in Church“—”This isn’t your usual boring church service!”
  • Watch “Myself and 39 Irish female Artists come together to perform “DREAMS” by The Cranberries.” A benefit by Irish Women in Harmony for Safe Ireland.

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