Omnium Gatherum: 29nov2020

An irregular hodgepodge of links gathered together … Omnium Gatherum for November 29, 2020

Here’s a variety of notable things I’ve recently found that you may also be interested in checking out:

  • Tonight! “Judi Dench and Ian McKellen head cast for Zoom show in aid of UK theatre workers. Maggie Smith and Derek Jacobi also among those who will take part in comedy fundraiser.” “The comedy performance, called For One Knight Only, will take place on 29 November and tickets cost £45.” “Judi Dench, Ian McKellen and Maggie Smith are among some of the biggest names in British theatre who will join forces for a one-off Zoom performance in aid of the struggling arts industry. Derek Jacobi and Kenneth Branagh will also take part in the performance, which will raise money for people who used to work in UK theatres closed by the pandemic.” Lockdown Theatre, in Association With Acting for Others, Presents: For One Knight Only, Sunday November 29th 2020 7pm (GMT), Tickets £45.
  • Oh, yeah! It’s almost time to start following news about the Gävle Goat!
    There’s already new posts on the Gävlebocken twitter and live stream scheduled for today, Nov 29th, 10am US/Central! Also, head to their site to get your DIY Bockcorn papercraft 🍿 so you’re ready! I gotta say whilst I look forward to the spirit raising fun of vicariously sacrificing a goat in effigy each season up until now, I’m a little ambivalent this year. I’d be okay if the little guy survived the season. I mean, I’ll still enjoy the shit out of it going up in flames, if it does, but I’m also kinda hoping it doesn’t, this time around.

  • Coil: Sacred, Psychedelic, and Very Disciplined. Dais Records releases Coil’s 1999 “Musick to Play in the Dark” on November 27.” About Musick To Play In The Dark [Amazon, Spotify] by Coil
  • My memories of Coil.”—”My memories of Coil resound with warmth and affection and I still very much miss these two playful, inventive, innovative characters. Gracefully their music can continue to resonate and inspire others. Their story is modest, but one that touched and stimulated so many others.”
  • Check out this Large Seraph Pin [Also] by Jeffrey Kupperman, of library reflection Journal of the Western Mystery Tradition.
  • Troy Books has launched a new Redbubble shop featuring artwork and illustrations by Gemma Gary, drawn from a number of Troy’s titles and are available as a selection of art prints and other products. They’ve got a 10% Black Friday discount on all items through midnight on Monday, November 30.
  • Melancholia History Magazine, volume 5 (2020), from Centro Estudios Esoterismo Occidental, available for free download.
  • Issue 10.2 of the International Journal for the Study of New Religions is now available, open access.
  • Sursum, quando arte e occulto si incontrano.” In English: “Sursum, when art and the occult meet.”—”Among the various artistic currents that developed in those years in the territory of the modern day Czech Republic, what deserves particular attention was what has been defined as ‘The second generation of symbolists’, which found its maximum expression in the work of the Sursum artistic association (Umělecké sdružení Sursum), which takes its name from the Latin motto ‘Sursum corda’ (Lift up your hearts!).”
  • Sigil Engine—”Welcome to the Sigil Engine. A technomantic tool to create magickal sigils, quickly and easily.” Also, from 2015: Sigil Generator—”Choose from the dropdown below or just start typing to generate a sigil, calculate gematria, walk the tree of life, use a dreamachine, or deal tarot/runes/i-ching! ”
  • Has the Childhood Home of Jesus Been Found? Excavations underneath a convent have elicited some eye-popping claims from some experts.” About The Sisters of Nazareth Convent: A Roman-period, Byzantine, and Crusader Site in Central Nazareth by Ken Dark
  • Watch “How ‘voodoo’ became a metaphor for evil.”—”‘Voodoo’ has come to represent something evil when it appears in popular culture. ‘Black magic’, witchcraft – it’s always portrayed as something to be feared. But in reality, Vodou, as it’s correctly written, is an official religion practised by millions of people. Why has it been vilified for so long? Josh Toussaint-Strauss looks back over the history of Vodou and its portrayal to find an answer.”
  • “HOUSE OF SPELLS. Couple find ‘witchcraft den’ filled with animal skulls in secret nook under staircase while renovating 16th-century home. A COUPLE renovating an old country farmhouse have found spine-chilling “witchcraft” den hidden under their staircase.”
  • De Natura Deorum, a charity zine focused on Mythology, on digital pre-order, due January 2021. “Born from the desire to finance non-profit organizations committed to protecting the planet’s natural resources, ‘De Natura Deorum’ is a project focused on Nature and Mythology: nearly 130 pages divided into five chapters, one for each element (Fire, Water, Air, Earth and Spirit) complete with Character Designs, Illustrations, Poems and Short stories.”
  • The Coptic Life of Aaron. Critical Edition, Translation and Commentary [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher] by Jacques van der Vliet and Jitse Dijkstra—”The Life of Aaron is one of the most interesting and sophisticated hagiographical works surviving in Coptic. The work contains descriptions of the lives of ascetic monks, in particular Apa Aaron, on the southern Egyptian frontier in the fourth and early fifth centuries, and was probably written in the sixth century. Even though the first edition of this work was already published by E.A. Wallis Budge in 1915, a critical edition remained outstanding. In this book Jitse H.F. Dijkstra and Jacques van der Vliet present not only a critical text, for the most part based on the only completely preserved, tenth-century manuscript, but also a new translation and an exhaustive commentary addressing philological, literary and historical aspects of the text.”
  • Jesus and Addiction to Origins: Toward an Anthropocentric Study of Religion [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher] by Willi Braun edited by Russell McCutcheon, afterword by William Arnal—”This collection of essays constitutes an extended argument for an anthropocentric, human-focused study of religious practices. Part I presents the basic premise of the argument, which is that there is nothing special or extraordinary about human behaviors and constructs that are claimed to have uniquely religious status and authority. Instead, they are fundamentally human, and so the scholar of religion is engaged in nothing more or less than studying humans across time and place in all their complex existence—which includes creating more-than-human beings and realities. As an extended and detailed example of such an approach, Part II addresses practices, rhetoric, and other data in early Christianities within Greco-Roman cultures and religions. The underlying aim is to insert studies of the New Testament and non-canonical texts, most often presented as “biblical studies,” into the anthropocentric study of religion proposed in Part I. How might we approach the study of “sacred texts” if they are nothing more or less than human documents deriving from situations that were themselves all too human? Braun’s Jesus and Addiction to Origins addresses that question with clarity and insight.”
  • The Jefferson Bible: A Biography [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher] by Peter Manseau, part of the Lives of Great Religious Books series—”The life and times of a uniquely American testament. In his retirement, Thomas Jefferson edited the New Testament with a penknife and glue, removing all mention of miracles and other supernatural events. Inspired by the ideals of the Enlightenment, Jefferson hoped to reconcile Christian tradition with reason by presenting Jesus of Nazareth as a great moral teacher—not a divine one. Peter Manseau tells the story of the Jefferson Bible, exploring how each new generation has reimagined the book in its own image as readers grapple with both the legacy of the man who made it and the place of religion in American life. Completed in 1820 and rediscovered by chance in the late nineteenth century after being lost for decades, Jefferson’s cut-and-paste scripture has meant different things to different people. Some have held it up as evidence that America is a Christian nation founded on the lessons of the Gospels. Others see it as proof of the Founders’ intent to root out the stubborn influence of faith. Manseau explains Jefferson’s personal religion and philosophy, shedding light on the influences and ideas that inspired him to radically revise the Gospels. He situates the creation of the Jefferson Bible within the broader search for the historical Jesus, and examines the book’s role in American religious disputes over the interpretation of scripture. Manseau describes the intrigue surrounding the loss and rediscovery of the Jefferson Bible, and traces its remarkable reception history from its first planned printing in 1904 for members of Congress to its persistent power to provoke and enlighten us today.”
  • (In)Visibility: Reflections upon Visibility and Transcendence in Theology, Philosophy and the Arts. [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher] edited by Anna Vind, Iben Damgaard, Kirsten Busch Nielsen, and Sven Rune Havsteen—”The content of the book reconsiders the relation between visibility and transcendence. The focus is especially on the contribution to this issue from the theological tradition in protestant Europe between the 16th and the 21st Centuries. In the book a thematically broad field is covered embracing more than five centuries and a plurality of methods drawn from theology, philosophy, and the history and theory of art.The book is divided into five sub-themes: In the first and more fundamental part, ‘The phenomenology of in-visibility’, questions underlying the other four themes are sought defined or narrowed down. Here the modes of appearing/revealing or hiding of phenomena are reflected. In the second section of the book dealing with ‘Language as a mode of revealing and hiding’ the specific role of verbal expressions understood in a very broad sense is at the core: What is the fundamental understanding and use of language, when speaking of the ineffable? The third section about ‘Human existence between visibility and invisibility’ focuses on theological anthropology: its features and norms. The ambiguity of anthropological categories such as faith, rationality, imagination, memory and emotion play a prominent role in this context. The fourth section concerning ‘The manifestation of a ‘beyond’ in the arts’ investigates transcendence in the arts. What are the theological discourses behind the religious uses of the different artistic media (i.e. images, music, liturgical inventory, architecture)? Finally in the fifth section concerning ‘Visible community and invisible transcendence’ one finds contributions working with the idea of ‘vicarious representation’.”
  • Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher] edited by Nicole Belayche and Francesco Massa, volume 194 of the Religions in the Graeco-Roman World series—”Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity aims to fill a gap in the study of mystery cults in Graeco-Roman Antiquity by focusing on images for investigating their ritual praxis. Nicole Belayche and Francesco Massa have gathered experts on visual language in order to illuminate cultic rituals renowned for both their “mysteries” and their images. This book tackles three interrelated questions. Focusing on the cult of Dionysus, it analyses whether, and how, images are used to depict mystery cults. The relationship between historiography and images of mystery cults is considered with a focus on the Mithraic and Isiac cults. Finally, turning to the cults of Dionysus and the Mother of the Gods, this work shows how depictions of specific cultic objects succeed in expressing mystery cults.”
  • Two Gods in Heaven: Jewish Concepts of God in Antiquity [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher] by Peter Schäfer, translated by Allison Brown—”A book that challenges our most basic assumptions about Judeo-Christian monotheism” “Contrary to popular belief, Judaism was not always strictly monotheistic. Two Gods in Heaven reveals the long and little-known history of a second, junior god in Judaism, showing how this idea was embraced by rabbis and Jewish mystics in the early centuries of the common era and casting Judaism’s relationship with Christianity in an entirely different light. Drawing on an in-depth analysis of ancient sources that have received little attention until now, Peter Schäfer demonstrates how the Jews of the pre-Christian Second Temple period had various names for a second heavenly power—such as Son of Man, Son of the Most High, and Firstborn before All Creation. He traces the development of the concept from the Son of Man vision in the biblical book of Daniel to the Qumran literature, the Ethiopic book of Enoch, and the Jewish philosopher Philo of Alexandria. After the destruction of the Second Temple, the picture changes drastically. While the early Christians of the New Testament took up the idea and developed it further, their Jewish contemporaries were divided. Most rejected the second god, but some—particularly the Jews of Babylonia and the writers of early Jewish mysticism—revived the ancient Jewish notion of two gods in heaven. Describing how early Christianity and certain strands of rabbinic Judaism competed for ownership of a second god to the creator, this boldly argued and elegantly written book radically transforms our understanding of Judeo-Christian monotheism.”
  • The Final Pagan Generation: Rome’s Unexpected Path to Christianity [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher] by Edward J. Watts,part of the Transformation of the Classical Heritage series—”A compelling history of radical transformation in the fourth-century–when Christianity decimated the practices of traditional pagan religion in the Roman Empire.” “The Final Pagan Generation recounts the fascinating story of the lives and fortunes of the last Romans born before the Emperor Constantine converted to Christianity. Edward J. Watts traces their experiences of living through the fourth century’s dramatic religious and political changes, when heated confrontations saw the Christian establishment legislate against pagan practices as mobs attacked pagan holy sites and temples. The emperors who issued these laws, the imperial officials charged with implementing them, and the Christian perpetrators of religious violence were almost exclusively young men whose attitudes and actions contrasted markedly with those of the earlier generation, who shared neither their juniors’ interest in creating sharply defined religious identities nor their propensity for violent conflict. Watts examines why the “final pagan generation”—born to the old ways and the old world in which it seemed to everyone that religious practices would continue as they had for the past two thousand years—proved both unable to anticipate the changes that imperially sponsored Christianity produced and unwilling to resist them. A compelling and provocative read, suitable for the general reader as well as students and scholars of the ancient world.”
  • Bertelsmann to Buy S&S for $2.2 Billion.”—”Bertelsmann has emerged as the winning bidder for Simon & Schuster. In an announcement this morning, the parent company of Penguin Random House said it had reached an agreement to buy S&S from ViacomCBS for $2.175 billion.” Also “Book Business Reacts to Simon & Schuster Sale.” Also “Pretty Soon There’ll Be Just One Big Book Publisher Left. The acquisition of Simon & Schuster by Penguin Random House shows that the industry is headed toward a monopolistic singularity.” Also The Monster Publishing Merger Is About Amazon. Penguin Random House purchasing Simon & Schuster is not the gravest danger to the publishing business. The deal is transpiring in a larger context—and that context is Amazon.”
  • William S Burroughs and the Cult of Rock’n’Roll by Casey Rae review – countercultural hero. From Bowie to Cobain, heavy metal to Blade Runner – how the Naked Lunch author changed pop culture.” About William S. Burroughs and the Cult of Rock ‘n’ Roll [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher] by library anthology artist Casey Rae—”William S. Burroughs’s fiction and essays are legendary, but his influence on music’s counterculture has been less well documented-until now. Examining how one of America’s most controversial literary figures altered the destinies of many notable and varied musicians, William S. Burroughs and the Cult of Rock ‘n’ Roll reveals the transformations in music history that can be traced to Burroughs.”
  • Delusions of failure. We are drawn to the idea that we can turn our mistakes into milestones – but there are no great lessons to be learned from losing.” About If You Should Fail: A Book Of Solace [Amazon, Publisher] by Joe Moran—”Enter widely acclaimed observer of daily life Professor Joe Moran, not to tell you that everything will be all right in the end, but to reassure you that failure is an occupational hazard of being human. It’s the small print in life’s terms and conditions.” And about Failosophy: A Handbook For When Things Go Wrong [Amazon, Publisher] by Elizabeth Day—”In Failosophy Elizabeth Day brings together all the lessons she has learned, from conversations with the guests on her award-winning How to Fail podcast, from stories shared with her by readers and listeners, and from her own life, and distils them into seven principles of failure.”
  • Down with Occurrences.” About Out of Italy: Two Centuries of World Domination and Demise [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher] by Fernand Braudel, translated by Siân Reynolds—”In the fifteenth century, even before the city states of the Apennine Peninsula began to coalesce into what would become, several centuries later, a nation, “Italy” exerted enormous influence over all of Europe and throughout the Mediterranean. Its cultural, economic, and political dominance is utterly astonishing and unique in world history. Viewing the Italy–the many Italies–of that time through the lens of today allows us to gather a fragmented, multi-faceted and seemingly contradictory history into a single unifying narrative that speaks to our current reality as much as it does to a specific historical period. This is what the acclaimed French historian, Fernand Braudel, achieves here. He brings to life the two extraordinary centuries that span the Renaissance, Mannerism, and the Baroque and analyzes the complex interaction between art, science, politics and commerce during Italy’s extraordinary cultural flowering.”
  • The Way We Speak Now: On David Bromwich’s ‘Writing Politics’.” About Writing Politics: An Anthology [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher] edited and with an introduction by David Bromwich—”David Bromwich is one of the most well-informed, cogent, and morally uncompromising political writers on the left today. He is also one of our finest intellectual historians and literary critics. In Writing Politics, Bromwich presents twenty-seven essays by different writers from the beginning of the modern political world in the seventeenth century until recent times, essays that grapple with issues that continue to shape history—revolution and war, racism, women’s rights, the status of the worker, the nature of citizenship, imperialism, violence and nonviolence, among them—and essays that have also been chosen as superlative examples of the power of written English to reshape our thoughts and the world. Jonathan Swift, Edmund Burke, Henry David Thoreau, Harriet Taylor, Abraham Lincoln, George Eliot, W. E. B. Du Bois, Mohandas Gandhi, Virginia Woolf, Martin Luther King, and Hannah Arendt are here, among others, along with a wide-ranging introduction.”
  • “Review: Rebecca Harkins-Crosson the Ferrante Letters. A Dying Art.” About The Ferrante Letters: An Experiment in Collective Criticism [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher] by Sarah Chihaya, Merve Emre, Katherine Hill, and Jill Richards; part of the Literature Now series—”Like few other works of contemporary literature, Elena Ferrante’s Neapolitan novels found an audience of passionate and engaged readers around the world. Inspired by Ferrante’s intense depiction of female friendship and women’s intellectual lives, four critics embarked upon a project that was both work and play: to create a series of epistolary readings of the Neapolitan Quartet that also develops new ways of reading and thinking together.”
  • “Middle-age crisis. The Light Ages: The Surprising Story of Medieval Science by Seb Falk reviewed.” About The Light Ages: The Surprising Story of Medieval Science [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher] by Seb Falk—”An illuminating guide to the scientific and technological achievements of the Middle Ages through the life of a crusading astronomer-monk.” “The Light Ages offers a gripping story of the struggles and successes of an ordinary man in a precarious world and conjures a vivid picture of medieval life as we have never seen it before. An enlightening history that argues that these times weren’t so dark after all, The Light Ages shows how medieval ideas continue to color how we see the world today.”
  • The Liberal Establishment Is ‘a Stranger to Self-Examination’. A conversation with Pankaj Mishra about Biden’s closer-than-expected victory, the sterile state of mainstream intellectual culture, and his new book Bland Fanatics.” About Bland Fanatics: Liberals, Race, and Empire [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher] by Pankaj Mishra—”A wide-ranging, controversial collection of critical essays on the political mania plaguing the West by one of the most important public intellectuals of our time.”
  • Government Security Clearance Isn’t Always Great fora Writing Career. ‘I submitted my work and waited. And waited. Fifteen months, I waited.'”
  • Jupiter and Saturn are going to form a ‘double planet’ before Christmas. Jupiter and Saturn will align in a way that shows a double-planet.” Also “Jupiter and Saturn are about to do something not seen for nearly 800 years.”
  • From the Quark dept., it’s the United Galactic Sanitation Patrol: “ESA commissions world’s first space debris removal
  • Can a Computer Devise a Theory of Everything? It might be possible, physicists say, but not anytime soon. And there’s no guarantee that we humans will understand the result.”
  • Ancient Earth had a thick, toxic atmosphere like Venus—until it cooled off and became liveable.”
  • Earth is closer to supermassive black hole at center of our galaxy than we thought.”
  • Scientists find neutrinos from star fusion for the first time.”
  • Teacher’s decades-old find on a Northern Ireland beach turns out to be the island’s first-ever dinosaur discovery
  • Dino-era bird had the head of a Velociraptor and beak of a toucan. Meet the “Toucan Sam” of the dinosaur era.”
  • Neutrino detection gets to the core of the Sun.”
  • Temple Restoration Reveals Previously Unknown Names of Ancient Egyptian Constellations. The restoration of an ancient Egyptian temple in Esna, located about 60 km south of the ancient capital of Luxor in Egypt, has uncovered the original colors of the temple inscriptions and images, and revealed previously unknown names of ancient Egyptian constellations.”
  • Amateur astronomer Alberto Caballero finds possible source of Wow! signal.”
  • Leaf-cutter ant first insect found with biomineral body armour.”
  • New X-ray technique reveals clues about ancient 1,900-year-old mummy
  • Facebook Struggles to Balance Civility and Growth. Employees and executives are battling over how to reduce misinformation and hate speech without hurting the company’s bottom line.” Also tweet—”Facebook also ran tests this year to figure out if ‘bad for the world’ content could be demoted in users’ feeds. It could, but there was a problem: it decreased the number of times users opened Facebook.”
  • Tweet—”Holy fuck. The word dystopian is not nearly strong enough to describe the fresh hellhole Microsoft just opened up. Just as the reputation of a new and better company was being built, they detonate it with the most invasive work-place surveillance scheme yet to hit mainstream.” Also tweet—”They told us who they were back in 2013 when it came to systematizing and promoting the exploitation of workers, but we did not really listen, did we?” Also tweet—”Esoteric metrics based on analyzing extensive data about employee activities has been mostly the domain of fringe software vendors. Now it’s built into MS 365. A new feature to calculate ‘productivity scores’ turns Microsoft 365 into an full-fledged workplace surveillance tool:” From 2013: Microsoft’s dystopian pitch for remote work.
  • Tweet thread of a train wreak—”Broken Arrow City Council about to vote on whether they want to pass a resolution ‘strongly encouraging the use of masks’. There was a ton of misinformation about masks/COVID at their last meeting so I wouldn’t take it as a given that even this will pass, but, let’s see”
  • Tweet thread—”Right-wing media is now absolutely completely consumed by anti-voting machine hysteria. I have to tell you, I’m okay with this! If their anxiety results in more thorough audit trails and a determination to keep these machines updated and with paper verification, it’s good!”
  • Bird flu fears grow after spate of mysterious UK swan deaths. Virus causing ‘high levels of mortality’ in birds, with risk to chickens and other poultry”
  • Pope Francis: A Crisis Reveals What Is in Our Hearts. To come out of this pandemic better than we went in, we must let ourselves be touched by others’ pain.”
  • Americans revive spirit of first Thanksgiving by carrying disease to new areas.”
  • Lockdown loneliness: Social isolation makes you ‘crave’ company like a hungry person longs for food.”
  • Prof Said Jade Amulets May Block COVID—and Became a Science Supervillain. Unlike bogus far-right conspiracy theories about COVID-19, this idea did not emerge from the digital fringe, but from a respected academic journal, resulting in a total shitshow.”
  • A mildly insane idea for disabling the coronavirus. What happens when you set biotechnologists loose without any practicality limits?”

  • We don’t have a COVID vaccine yet, but distribution is already messy. Vaccine allocated based on population, not cases or high-risk groups.”
  • How three conspiracy theorists took ‘Q’ and sparked Qanon. Pushing the theory on to bigger platforms proved to be the key to Qanon’s spread — and the originators’ financial gain.”
  • From the What Is Dead May Never Die dept: “The Kraken: What is it and why has Trump’s ex-lawyer released it?.”
  • I’m not sure he thought this one through? “Trump Is Racing to Bring Back Firing-Squad Executions Before He Leaves Office, Says Report.”
  • Inside the Lives of Immigrant Teens Working Dangerous Night Shifts in Suburban Factories. During the day, immigrant teenagers attend high school. At night, they work in factories to pay debts to smugglers and send money to family. The authorities aren’t surprised by child labor. They’re also not doing much about it.”
  • The Right-Wing Medievalist Who Refused the Loyalty Oath. On Ernst Kantorowicz, academic freedom, and ‘the secret university.'”
  • Why We Need to Decolonise and Democratise Our Imaginations. Our collective imagination both shapes and is shaped by reality. We desperately need an intervention.”
  • From the Indo-European Horse Epic dept: “The Horse Girl Canon“—”Space,Space, dinosaurs, trains, wolves, trucks, dolphins, construction machines, dragons — there are as many different childhood obsessions as there are children. And then there are horses, and their fans: the Horse Girls.” Also Aragorn is absolutely a Horse Girl. But only in the movies.”
  • Torturing Geniuses.”
  • How to Lose a $10 Million Botticelli Masterpiece. A famous painting by Botticelli has been missing for six years. Is it hiding in plain sight?” What ho?! “Kraken Investments” is mentioned. MOAR KRAKEN!
  • This is from a while ago, but, since we’re on the topic: Seattle Kraken Hockey. “Now, we breathe new life into a legend. An ancient and powerful force reawakens in the heart of the great Pacific Northwest.”
  • A Case for a More Regional Understanding of Food. American food media’s focus on national cuisines turns cultures into monoliths as it ignores regional differences in cooking and eating.”
  • Watch “The World’s Bounciest Surface“—”In this video I show you what it looks like to drop a ball on one of the bounciest surfaces in the world. The coefficient of restitution is 97% or greater. I show you how you can easily make this bouncy surface at home as well!”
  • I like Conlangs, and I cannot lie. Also this reminds other stories like how Viggo Mortensen and Liv Tyler learned enough Elvish to want new scenes written for them. And how Jorma Taccone learned Pakuni for The Land of the Lost movie. And the cast of The 100 started speaking Trigedasleng. “Emilia Clarke was asked to rewrite an entire ‘Game of Thrones’ scene in Valyrian, and she pulled it off in 10 minutes.”
  • Scarfolk Beer Mat Set by Richard Littler.

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