Category Archives: The International: A Review of Two Worlds

The Mass of the Phoenix public and private

Coph Nia, a local body of Ordo Templi Orientis in the valley of Eugene, OR, whose body master is Hermetic Library fellow David Richard Jones sent a sheet with two version of Liber XLIV, The Mass of the Phoenix; one is the familiar version which is a eucharistic ritual for an individual Magician, and the other is a version you may or may not know about, a version once ‘ordained for public service’, which is designed as a public eucharistic ritual that predates the Gnostic Mass, which was first published in The International in March 1918 and written in 1915 during Russian tour of Crowley’s Ragged Ragtime Girls troupe, as a Thelemic ritual designed for public service. This last “was publicly performed, in London, by Crowley, Leila Waddell & possibly Victor Neuburg” in 1913, and you can find it published in Equinox IV 2, p 370, as a footnote to Liber CDXV, Opus Lutetianum or The Paris Working. This handy reference has arrived and is now part of the collection at the Reading Room.

Coph Nia Mass of the Phoenix

The Revival of Magick and Other Essays

The Revival of Magick and Other Essays by Aleister Crowley, edited by Hymenaeus Beta, afterword by Samuel Aiwaz Jacobs, a 1998 paperback from New Falcon, the 2nd in the Oriflamme series, with cover design by John Bowie, is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

Aleister Crowley The Revival of Magick and Other Essays from New Falcon

This is the 2nd in the newer Oriflamme series, of which the first was Freedom is a Two-Edged Sword and Other Essays by Jack Parsons, and of which there has not yet been a 3rd. The original Oriflamme was an early newsletter from Theodor Reuss and Ordo Templi Orientis, a title which has appeared in various and varied usage since and is here used again for the newer series of books.

“This collection is concerned with Aleister Crowley as an essayist. This literary form gave full range to his wit, humor, knowledge, and command of English. Most of his essays are as fresh today as when they were first written, and some of his best are collected here, forming a curiously charming sampling of Crowley’s opinions and interests. His essay subjects are wide-ranging, including mysticism, magick, travel, humor, social satire, drugs, psychoanalysis, religious fundamentalism, ‘pop’ occultism, art, divination, mythology, and drama. Crowley preaches his new Law of Thelema in several passionate essays and epistlatory letters, explaining the religious philosophy of the new law given in 1904 e.v. by Liber AL vel Legis, The Book of the Law. Sometimes writing as Crowley the man, at other times as The Master Therion, Magus of the New Æon of Horus, the recipients range from a fellow writer (the American novelist James Branch Cabell). to an industrialist (Henry Ford), to his colleagues. Crowley makes doctrinal connections not made elsewhere, many of great relevance to the theology and social philosophy of Thelema, discussing François Rabelais and William Blake. he also discusses the practical application of his philosophy at that great experiment in Thelemic monasticism, the Abbey of Thelema in Sicily.

The intent of this collection is to introduce Crowley’s writing to a wider modern audience, and his essays have been annotated thoroughly, including notes on sources, a bibliography of works cited, and an index. The Oriflamme is a series of monographs on magick, mysticism and the history of ideas. This is the second number of a new series.” — back cover

 

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Absinthe

Apollon, qui pleurait le trépas d’Hyacinthe,

Ne voulait pas céder la victoire à la mort.

Il fallait que son âme, adepte de l’essor,

Trouvât pour la beauté une alchimie plus sainte.

Donc, de sa main céleste il épuise, il éreinte

Les dons les plus subtils de la divine Flore.

Leurs corps brisés soupirent une exhalaison d’or

Dont il nous recueillait la goutte de l’Absinthe!

Aux cavernes blotties, aux palais pétillants,

Par un, par deux, buvez ce breuvage d’aimant.

Car c’est un sortilège, un propos de dictame;

Ce vin d’opal pale avortit la misère,

Ouvre de la beauté l’intime sanctuaire

— Ensorcelle mon cœur, extasie mon âme!

Jeanne Le Goulue (Aleister Crowley), The International, XI 10

 

Apollo, who mourned at Hyacinthe’s demise,

Refused to concede this victory to Death.

Much better that the soul, adept in transformation,

Had to find a holy alchemy for beauty.

Thus with his celestial hand he drained and crushed

The subtlest harvest of the garden goddess,

The broken bodies of the herbs yielding a golden essence

From which we measure out our first drop—of Absinthe!

In lowly hovels and in glittering courts,

Alone, in pairs, drink up this potion of desire!

For it is sorcery—as one might say—

When the pale opal wine ends all misery,

Opens beauty’s most intimate sanctuary—

—Bewitches my heart, and exalts my soul in ecstasy!

The Revival of Magick and The Initiated Interpretation of Ceremonial Magic

The Revival of Magick is the third new edition from 100th Monkey Press, available in a hand-bound limited edition.

Aleister Crowley's The Revival of Magick from 100th Monkey Press

Aleister Crowley’s essay “The Revival of Magick” was originally published under the pseudonym “The Master Therion” in a four part series in The International: A Review of Two Worlds from August through November 1917. Crowley’s affiliation with The International occurred during his five-year stay in America from 1914 through 1919. Not long after his arrival, Crowley found himself in financial straits and found a partial solution in the form of George Sylvester Viereck, a writer and editor who owned two journals, The Fatherland and The International.

The Fatherland was a propaganda journal funded by the German government designed to promote pro-German thought and to help keep America out of World War I. Crowley began by writing pro-German articles for The Fatherland and soon began writing for The International as well in July 1915.

Over the ensuing years he contributed various articles and poetry and became managing editor of The International in August of 1917. At this point the journal became a primary outlet for Crowley’s writings and he began writing a large portion of the journal employing various pseudonyms to disguise the fact that he was the primary contributor.

Besides being an outlet for his poetry and short stories, The International provided him a vehicle to advocate the message of Thelema through such essays as “The Revival of Magick.” [via]

Aleister Crowley's The Revival of Magick from 100th Monkey Press interior

Each book is bound by hand in a Japanese style binding and measures 5 1/2” x 8 1/2″. 48 pages. Printed in blue and black on 70 pound text weight, acid-free paper specifically chosen for this edition. Bound in an acid-free, glued-up composition cover consisting of textured black faux leather over custom printed endpapers. Text set in both Freehand and High Tower text. Illustrations include reproductions of the original covers from The International and a self-portrait by Crowley of him evoking the great demon Paimon to visible appearance.

As an added bonus, each book comes with a hand-bound copy of Crowley’s “The Initiated Interpretation of Ceremonial Magic.”

Each copy also includes a handsome themed bookplate and bookmark.

Edition limited to 150 numbered copies. Price: US $14.95 [via]

Pax Hominibus Bonae Voluntatis by Aleister Crowley in International, Dec 1917.

“The American Civil War would have resulted in the utter ruin of the whole country had it not been that Grant, in the moment of victory, forgot all about Simon Legree, dismissed the whole howling of the wolves of the press as nonsense, and observed succinctly: Let us have peace.” [via]