Category Archives: Colin Campbell – De Arte Magica

The Pauline Art of Solomon

The Pauline Art of Solomon is a new post by Hermetic Library Fellow Colin Campbell on his blog Colin Campbell’s De Arte Magica

You know I love me some Hockley, so I was really happy to see that Alan Thorogood has released another excellent volume. In the tradition of works to date, the book has an introduction by Thorogood, a transcription, and lastly the facsimile of the manuscript.

The introduction was fascinating and shows Thorogood’s depth of knowledge not only of Hockley but of the manuscripts that feed into his work. This is what I particularly like about this series from Teitan Press – I’d buy them for the introductions alone and never be disappointed. Thorogood traces the roots of the work to its probable sources, and shows how a number of mistakes worked their way in, as is common with works of this type.

The Pauline Art is of course itself a part of the (in)famous Lesser Key of Solomon, which also contains Goetia. The Pauline Art is the third of the five books compiled in that treatise, following Goetia and Theurgia-Goetia. The manuscript used by Hockley is “dated Feb. 1715, and is very finely written in red and black with colored seals.” Hockley further notes the provenance as being traced back to a manuscript of 1641 (in a common variant of Lemegeton), but that the work also goes back further – citing references to Agrippa’s mention in 1533, among others.

As for the facsimile, it is in Hockley’s always-impeccable hand, which is always a relief for those of us who like to transcribe these things! The manuscript is nearly complete, though there are a few missing seals – not uncommon for Hockley manuscripts at all. I suspect one could work them out, should there not be access to a complete copy.

All of these works are of value to the collector and student of magic in the Solomonic tradition, and I look forward to what more may come of the Hockley series!


For more information, see the Teitan Press website. While you are there, check out my own related works: The Offices of Spirits and Of the Arte Goetia.

Disclaimer: I also publish through Teitan Press and received a review copy of this work.

The Magic Seal of Dr John Dee

The Magic Seal of Dr. John Dee. The Sigillum Dei Aemeth by Hermetic Library fellow Colin Campbell, the 2009 hardcover limited to 777 copies from Teitan Press, is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

Colin Campbell The Magic Seal of Dr John Dee from Teitan Press

The Magic Seal of John Dee comprises a detailed examination of the history and structure of the Sigillum Dei Aemeth of the Elizabethan scholar and Magus, Dr. John Dee, as well as a study of its use in the practice of ritual magic. The appendixes include a new transcription and translation of Dee’s Liber Mysteriorum Secundus, and an important new translation of the section of the famous grimoire, The Sworn Book of Honorius, that gives details of what is clearly a precursor of the Sigillum Dei. From the standpoint of a practicing magician, the work has two clear aims: to demonstrate the importance of the pattern established by Dee’s Sigillum Dei as opposed to its implementation, and to bring the Sigillum Dei out of the limited confines of the Enochian temple and into its role as a powerful magickal system in its own right. The recognition of the patterns established in the construction of the Sigillum Dei allow us to view the seal in a new light, not as a static framework decided once and for all hundreds of years ago in the study of a Renaissance magician, but as one that can be reconstituted in the light of modern interpretation. Furthermore, the seal is, in essence, a system of evocation — the very same method of communication used by Dee & Kelley in its reception. This book explains the nature and method of this approach and how the practicing magician is able to use the Sigillum Dei in the manner in which it was truly intended — as a powerful system of planetary magick.” [via]

 

The Hermetic Library Reading Room is an imaginary and speculative future reification of the library in the physical world, a place to experience a cabinet of curiosities offering a confabulation of curation, context and community that engages, archives and encourages a living Western Esoteric Tradition. If you would like to contribute to the Hermetic Library Reading Room, consider supporting the library or contact the librarian.

A Concordance to the Holy Books of Thelema

A Concordance to the Holy Books of Thelema by Hermetic Library fellow Colin Campbell, the 2008 hardcover limited to 418 copies from Teitan Press, is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

Colin Campbell Richard Kaczynski A Concordance to the Holy Books of Thelema from Teitan Press

“‘The Holy Books of Thelema,’ is the collective name given to the group of inspired texts received by Aleister Crowley between the years 1904 and 1911. These texts lie at the very heart of the teachings of his magical fraternity, the A∴ A∴, and consequently have been the subject of intense study and commentary by Crowley himself, and also by many of his students.

A Concordance to the Holy Books of Thelema is an important new tool for those engaged in the study of these beautiful and enigmatic books. It comprises a survey of every word in these texts, along with a brief quotation to give the context in which each word is used, and the location in which it appears.

On the most basic level A Concordance to the Holy Books of Thelema serves as a convenient reference guide or index to the contents of The Holy Books. More importantly, it provides a level of access to the basic elements of the structure and composition of the texts that no conventional reading would afford. Key words and their frequencies of use become apparent, broader usage patterns are revealed, and the identification of particular phraseologies and idioms is simplified. The new paths of exploration that it opens for those with knowledge of the Kabbalah and Gematria are too numerous to list.

The Concordance includes an Introduction by the compiler, Colin D. Campbell, a student and teacher of the Thelemic, Kabbalistic, and Enochian magickal systems, and a Foreword by Crowley biographer and scholar, Dr. Richard Kaczynski.”

 

The Hermetic Library Reading Room is an imaginary and speculative future reification of the library in the physical world, a place to experience a cabinet of curiosities offering a confabulation of curation, context and community that engages, archives and encourages a living Western Esoteric Tradition. If you would like to contribute to the Hermetic Library Reading Room, consider supporting the library or contact the librarian.

Manifest Thy Glory

Manifest Thy Glory: Proceedings of the Eighth Biennial National Ordo Templi Orientis Conference was recently released, and may be of interest. This book includes the text of presentations by many Hermetic Library fellows, including Sabazius, T Polyphilus, Colin Campbell, and Beth Kimbell, and touches many topics related to the subject matter of the library.

National Ordo Templi Orientis Conference NOTOCON Manifest Thy Glory

Manifest Thy Glory offers a selection of papers from the eighth biennial National Ordo Templi Orientis Conference (NOTOCON) of the United States Grand Lodge of O.T.O., held in the Valley of Detroit, Michigan, in 2011 EV. The papers cover diverse topics including the Holy Guardian Angel, talismans in magick, spatial orientation in ritual, and other magical methods; occult history and biography, including the Stèle of Revealing and Ida Craddock; promulgation of Thelema through publishing and podcasts; textual analysis from Catullus to ‘Liber Trigrammaton;’ a touching reminiscence from the incomparable Lon Milo DuQuette; and even space, the final frontier. Other highlights include a street guide to Thelemic historical sites in Detroit, and the address given by U.S. National Grand Master Sabazius. They represent some of best modern practical and scholarly work on Ordo Templi Orientis, Thelema, and the magick of Aleister Crowley.

The first NOTOCON conference took place in 1997 EV in Akron, Ohio, and has since been held on alternate years in different cities around the United States. Manifest Thy Glory is the third collection of papers from the national conference to be made available, following the inaugural volume Beauty & Strength for the 2007 EV conference.

Ordo Templi Orientis is an international fraternal order of men and women devoted to the pursuit of individual liberty, the study of magick, and the promulgation of the Law of Thelema. Founded in the early twentieth century, it has been shaped by such leading lights as Carl Kellner, Theodor Reuss, Aleister Crowley, Karl Germer and Grady Louis McMurtry.” [via]

Mr Spencer’s Cube

Hermetic Library fellow Colin Campbell posts about researching a passing mention in the essay “Initiated Interpretation of Ceremonial Magic” [also] by Aleister Crowley of “Mr Spencer’s Cube“.

“I was re-reading Crowley’s Initiated Interpretation of Ceremonial Magic in the front matter of his 1904 edition of Goetia for something around the seven hundredth time yesterday. In it, he mentions “Mr. Spencer’s Projected Cube”, something I had never taken the time to research. Until, well… yesterday.” [via]

Kill Me!

Hermetic Library fellow Colin Campbell has a new post about the recent update from OTO Grand Lodge that includes a new development in the long-standing issue of Aleister Crowley‘s poetic rendering of the Stele of Revealing offering two versions in print, and as it appears transcluded within the Book of the Law, Liber AL vel Legis, over on his blog at “Kill Me!” And, makes note also of how this relates to The Concordance of the Holy Books of Thelema:

“For those of you kind enough to have purchased The Concordance of the Holy Books of Thelema, all of the proceeds of which go to USGL, incidentally, this means striking verse III:37 from page 248 and adding it to the bottom of 258 under “kill”. For those of you that have not yet obtained a copy, there are more available, so you should definitely purchase one and then make the correction.” [via]

Vinculum Confusium

Hermetic Library fellow Colin Campbell has a new post about conjurations of Goetia over on his blog at “Vinculum Confusium“.

“So, here I am on another goose chase. … three manuscripts, listed in sequence, would seem to form the core of what has now become Goetia, but it’s not sure what’s become of them, nor can I say with certainty that they were actually what became Goetia.” [via]

NOTOCON IX presentations

The list of National Ordo Templi Orientis Conference (NOTOCON) presentations, and presenter bios, has been posted for the upcoming ninth biennial event on Aug 9th – 11th, 2013, being held in Sacramento, CA this time. In addition to several names you may recognize from posts here or content on the library site such as Lon Milo DuQuette, Richard Kaczynski, Christeos Pir and more, you will find Hermetic Library anthology artist David Shoemaker and fellows Colin Campbell and T Polyphilus are presenting this time around. Of course, library fellow Sabazius will also be there.

NOTOCON is the biennial conference for current members of OTO, with attendance minimally restricted to those who are initiates of at least Minerval, or 0°, with many presentations and events of interest. If you aren’t already a member, there’s still time to become a Minerval initiate before the conference, of course.

A Slightly Overdue Book

Hermetic Library fellow Colin Campbell has admitted to being a bad, but slightly reformed, library patron on his blog at “A Slightly Overdue Book“.

“Over the last weekend, I found myself traveling to my alma mater for the first time in a long time, and brought the book along to finally return it – sixteen years overdue. I informed the head librarian that I had to return an overdue book, which did not seem to phase him, then told him how overdue. After a pause of consideration, he laughed and became interested in the book itself. I told him a bit of the provenance, and while he did not once suggest there was going to be a late fee, I did offer a signed copy of my last book The Offices of Spirits as compensation for having it out so long. He noted that he would repair some of the binding of the Treatise and include it in their special collections going forward.” [via]