Category Archives: Hakim Bey and Ontological Anarchy

Wanna Burn Something? Calling All Manifesters

Wanna Burn Something? Calling All Manifesters” by Eileen Joy over at In The Middle links to and quotes Hakim Bey‘s Temporary Autonomous Zone.

“Agents of chaos cast burning glances at anything or anyone capable of bearing witness to their condition, their fever of lux et voluptas.” — Hakim Bey, Temporary Autonomous Zone

The post itself is an announcement about a project by punctum books, an interesting and independent open-access publisher, to publish the proceedings from “BURN AFTER READING: TINY MANIFESTOS FOR A POST/MEDIEVAL STUDIES” a conference session sponsored by the postmedieval: a journal of medieval cultural studies. In addition to the already existing manifestos planned from the session participants, there is, in the post, an open invitation to others who may wish to contribute additional tiny manifestos about the field of post/medieval and premodern studies.

“It is now the intention of punctum books to publish these “tiny” manifestos as part of a double-volume with the proceedings of GW-MEMSI’s sponsored panel at this year’s 2013 Kalamazoo Congress on THE FUTURE WE WANT featuring this line-up:

· Field Change / Discipline Change: Asa Simon Mittman, Anne Harris (for The Material Collective)
·Institutional Change / Paradigm Change: Aranye Fradenburg, Eileen Joy
·Time Change / Mode Change: Will Stockton, Allan Mitchell
·World Change / Sea Change: Lowell Duckert, Steve Mentz
·Voice Change / Language Change: Chris Piuma, Jonathan Hsy
·Collective Change / Mood Change: Julie Orlemanski, Julian Yates

Per this blog post, I would like to invite everyone and anyone to consider contributing to the “tiny” half of this volume by sending punctum books (punctumbooks@gmail.com) a 2-3-page typed/double-spaced RANT relative to your beef(s) about the “state of the field” and/or to your impassioned vision for a field-to-be (we’re talking premodern studies here, of any temporal bent from Year Zero to 1800).” [via]

Check out the full post for more details, and an example of what they are seeking.

Hakim Bey and Hakim Bey’s Temporary Autonomous Zone are linked to in the notes for Solipsistic Nation No. 268: Secret Archives of the Vatican

Hakim Bey and Hakim Bey’s Temporary Autonomous Zone are linked to in the notes for Solipsistic Nation No. 268: Secret Archives of the Vatican, a podcast interview with Vince Millett of the Broken Drum Records artist Secret Archives of the Vatican.

 

American Idol: On Nietzsche in America

American Idol: On Nietzsche in America” by Ross Posnock is an article in the Nation from Nov, 2011 which talks about Friedrich Nietzsche and a book American Nietzsche: A History of an Icon and His Ideas by Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen.

 

“Nietzsche paid a heavy price for daring to strip away the comforting props of Victorian piety, bringing readers face to face with the imperative ‘to become what you are.’ He launched his own version of Emerson’s project, which begins with the recognition that man is but ‘a half-man,’ a ‘dwarf of himself.’ The time was ripe: how thrilling it must have been for Americans long shackled to the ‘agonized conscience’ of Puritan rectitude, the ‘yoke’ of the genteel, in George Santayana’s phrasing. Cease hiding behind conformity and habit and laziness, Emerson and Nietzsche implore; the former invites ‘every man to expand to the full circle of the universe,’ while the latter will eventually call for the overcoming of the human, summoning what he will name the ‘overman.'” [via]

 

“Nietzsche-mania erupted in Europe a decade before the philosopher’s death in 1900, spreading throughout the continent and on to Russia, and reaching the United States in the new century’s first decade. A question raised almost at once (and periodically revived) was why Nietzsche was proving so popular here: ‘What is the philosophy of an anti-Christian, antidemocratic madman doing in a culture like ours? Why Nietzsche? Why in America?’ Ratner-Rosenhagen wonders. Nietzsche became the exemplar for those seeking, in Emerson’s words, ‘not instruction, but provocation’; not intellectual doctrine but the visceral sense of liberation in hearing the inadmissible given voice. Radical leftists—anarchists, socialists and feminists—were early enthusiasts, including Emma Goldman, Randolph Bourne and the Harlem socialist Hubert Harrison, who found in Nietzsche’s contempt for religion and democracy a way to rouse the masses from obedience to Christian ideals of submission and democratic fictions of a free market.” [via]

 

 

Of course, Friedrich Nietzsche is proclaimed Saint of Ecclesia Gnostica Catholica in the Gnostic Mass and there are other resources in the collection of the Hermetic Library. You may also be interested in these other articles at the library which mention Nietszche, to name a few:

Recent Chicago Reader post links to Hakim Bey’s TAZ: The Temporary Autonomous Zone, Ontological Anarchy, Poetic Terrorism

Recent Chicago Reader post at “A conversation with seapunks” links to Hakim Bey‘s TAZ: The Temporary Autonomous Zone, Ontological Anarchy, Poetic Terrorism while discussing a new microgenre of music and culture, and poses an abrupt critique of the typical implementation of and culture around temporary autonomous zones.

“I find the sort of spontaneous community building that seapunk embodies not only fascinating but also genuinely inspiring. (It’s like seeing Hakim Bey’s Temporary Autonomous Zone come to life, except without a bunch of tedious, quasi-intellectual Burning Man stereotypes involved.) I also have a predisposition toward ravey shit and I’m a professional Internet junkie, so there’s that too.” [via]

Recent Traditionalists blog post links to Hakim Bey and Ontological Anarchy

Recent Traditionalists blog post at “Anarchist Traditionalism: Hakim Bey” links to Hakim Bey and Ontological Anarchy and is a bit of analysis related to the previously mentioned interview with Peter Lamborn Wilson at “In Conversation with Hakim Bey“.

“Arthur Versluis’s recent interview (see below) with the American anarchist Peter Lamborn Wilson, who also writes as Hakim Bey, suggests that Lamborn Wilson’s anarchism is a leftist form of Political ‘Soft’ Traditionalism.” [via]

“Although some critics of Lamborn Wilson dismiss his work as no more than an attempt to justify his own practice of ‘man-boy love,’ in my view that work is too substantial and influential to be so dismissed.

In the Versluis interview, Lamborn Wilson makes clear that what he now values in Traditionalism is its critique of modernity, not its ‘proposal’ for responding to modernity. As an anarchist, Lamborn Wilson gives the state–and especially the all-powerful contemporary state–a prime position in his own critique of modernity. His own proposals lead in a number of directions, none of them revolutionary in the normal sense, given his perception that the state always manages to co-opt revolutions. He stresses that his proposals should be taken in a poetic as much as a literal sense. The most famous of them is the Temporary Autonomous Zone (TAZ),’an uprising which does not engage directly with the State, a guerrilla operation which liberates an area (of land, of time, of imagination) and then dissolves itself to re-form elsewhere/elsewhen, before the State can crush it’ (TAZ, quoted in Sellars 2011).” [via]