Category Archives: The Enochian and Thelemic Works of David Richard Jones

The Wand, Summer 2013 ev, An IVxxi

The Summer 2013 / An IVxxi issue of Wand, the journal of Coph Nia, a local body of Ordo Templi Orientis in the valley of Eugene, OR, whose body master is Hermetic Library fellow David Richard Jones, has arrived courtesy of that body and is now part of the collection at the Reading Room.

Coph Nia Wand Summer 2013 An IVxxi
Cover: Frater Achad, Charles Stansfeld Jones from An XV, Sun in Aries

The Mass of the Phoenix public and private

Coph Nia, a local body of Ordo Templi Orientis in the valley of Eugene, OR, whose body master is Hermetic Library fellow David Richard Jones sent a sheet with two version of Liber XLIV, The Mass of the Phoenix; one is the familiar version which is a eucharistic ritual for an individual Magician, and the other is a version you may or may not know about, a version once ‘ordained for public service’, which is designed as a public eucharistic ritual that predates the Gnostic Mass, which was first published in The International in March 1918 and written in 1915 during Russian tour of Crowley’s Ragged Ragtime Girls troupe, as a Thelemic ritual designed for public service. This last “was publicly performed, in London, by Crowley, Leila Waddell & possibly Victor Neuburg” in 1913, and you can find it published in Equinox IV 2, p 370, as a footnote to Liber CDXV, Opus Lutetianum or The Paris Working. This handy reference has arrived and is now part of the collection at the Reading Room.

Coph Nia Mass of the Phoenix

Lessons in De Cultu ΘΕΛΗΜΑ 1 & 2

A set of Lessons in De Cultu ΘΕΛΗΜΑ (On the Cultivation of Thelema) have arrived at the Hermetic Library courtesy of Coph Nia, a local body of Ordo Templi Orientis in the valley of Eugene, OR, and Hermetic Library fellow David Richard Jones.

Lessons in De Cultu THELEMA from Coph Nia

These are booklets created locally for Coph Nia’s De Cultu θελημα study group, with lesson 1 on The Holy Books of ΘΕΛΗΜΑ and lesson 2 on Liber Resh vel Helios, Book 200.

Seasonal greetings from Coph Nia on the Three Days of the Writing of the Book of the Law

A seasonal greeting from Hermetic Library fellow David Richard Jones and Coph Nia, a local body of Ordo Templi Orientis in the valley of Eugene, OR, on the Three Days of the Writing of the Book of the Law has arrived at the library, with a personal note and a dram of Oil of Abramelin:

Coph Nia's Abramelin for Three Days of the Writing of the Book of the Law

Liber Liberi, Chapter V with Comment

Liber Liberi vel Lapidis Lazuli Adumbratio Kabbalæ Ægyptorum, Chapter V with Comment is the newest in the series from Coph Nia, a local body of Ordo Templi Orientis in the valley of Eugene, OR, which has arrived at the Reading Room courtesy of that local body.

Coph Nia has been issuing a small number of pamphlets, as part of the work of a study group and also as a thank you for supporters of the body, which contain Class A technical libri by Aleister Crowley. The text of the technical libri are taken, of course, from the excellent versions online at the Hermetic Library, but are supplemented with a variety of additional commentary, which come a variety of sources including otherwise unpublished papers and notes. These works are being curated by the team at Coph Nia, which includes Hermetic Library fellow David R Jones.

Coph Nia's Liber Liberi, Chapter V with comment

Not only are these nice in and of themselves, but they are the praxis of a Holy Books study group, as David R. Jones writes, “… they are really nice little editions and they help us with our Holy Books study group. I do the first drafts and our group proofs them and adds input.”

I’ve had a chance to check out a number of these pamphlets and think they are quite well done. It is especially nice to have not only the text, but the comment and notes handily available together.

Coph Nia’s edition of Liber VII, pt 1

Coph Nia, a local body of Ordo Templi Orientis in the valley of Eugene, OR, has started issuing a small number of pamphlets which contain Class A technical libri by Aleister Crowley along with comment and notes. The text of the technical libri are taken, of course, from the excellent versions online at the Hermetic Library, but are supplemented with a variety of additional commentary, which come variously from sources such as Equinox IV, I as well as from otherwise unpublished papers and notes. These works are being curated by the team at Coph Nia, which includes Hermetic Library fellow David R Jones.


Coph Nia's edition of Liber VII, pt 1 [via]

“Liber VII pt. 1 (the Prologue & Chapter I) went out in the mail today. Regular supporters of Coph Nia will be receiving theirs in the mail soon. Thank you all, we really appreciate what you do for us. Copies are available for a $20 donation to Coph Nia Lodge (http://www.cophnia-oto.org/treasury.htm). Our print run is strictly limited to 93 copies and these are going fast.” [via]

Not only are these nice in and of themselves, but they are the praxis of a Holy Books study group, as David R. Jones writes, “… they are really nice little editions and they help us with our Holy Books study group. I do the first drafts and our group proofs them and adds input.”

I’ve had a chance to check out the first issue of these pamphlets, which was for Liber B vel Magi sub figura I, and think they are quite well done. It is especially nice to have not only the text, but the comment and notes handily available together.

An Historical Summary of Angelic Hierarchies from Part VII: The “Seven” Thrones in In Operibus Sigillo Dei Aemeth by David Richard Jones.

“In both St. Denis and in the Hermetica the philosophers and theologians of the Renaissance would find seemingly ancient authority for the correlation of their Neoplatonic speculations to Judeo-Christian angelology and metaphysics, speculations that would lead directly to the magical revival of the late Renaissance and the works of Ficino, Della Mirandola, Reuchlin, Cornelius Agrippa, Giordano Bruno and of course the angel magick of John Dee.” [via]

An Historical Summary of Angelic Hierarchies from Part VII: The “Seven” Thrones in In Operibus Sigillo Dei Aemeth by David Richard Jones.

“St. Denis would still have been standard Thomist theology for Dante and therefore the a priori schema of divine order. Dante’s understanding also indicates the brightest literary fluorescence of the Italian Renaissance and the growing influence of the rediscovery of the Greek philosophers, setting the stage for the radical influence that the discovery of the Corpus Hermetica would exert.” [via]

An Historical Summary of Angelic Hierarchies from Part VII: The “Seven” Thrones in In Operibus Sigillo Dei Aemeth by David Richard Jones.

“Thus for these three movements there are three movers. Moreover, the whole of this heaven moves and revolves with the epicycle from east to west once every day. Whether this movement derives from some intellect or from the pull of the Primum Mobile, only God knows, for it seems to me presumptuous to reach a conclusion on this point.” [via]

 


Dante Alighieri