Tag Archives: 2009

Abraxas 1

Abraxas Issue 1 [also], International Journal of Esoteric Studies, the Autumn Equinox 2009 standard issue from Fulgur, is part of the collection at the Reading Room. It appears, as of this writing, there is at least one copy of this still available through J D Holmes.

Abraxas issue 1 from Fulgur Limited

This was the inaugural issue for this new journal, and had contributions from Daniel A Schulke, Stephen Grasso, Stuart Inman, Francesco Parisi, Edward Gauntlett, James Butler, Sarah Penicka-Smith, Zachary Cox, Allyson Shaw, John Callow, Ellie Hughes, Phil Hine, Naagrom, Rebecca Beattie Stephen J Clarke, Lily Moss, Roberto Migliussi, Dolorosa, and Aleister Crowley.

“Nearly twelve years ago, while reading the typescripts for Zos Speaks! I found myself absorbed by plans between Austin Spare and Kenneth Grant to launch an esoteric magazine in the early 1950s. It was to be ‘essentially a coterie of adepts’ affirmed Spare, and ‘a work of art as a production’ with ‘the best typography and reproduction of drawings.’ This seemed to me such an excellent proposition that it was easy to become inspired, but the practical challenges against starting such a lavish venture in the late 1990s were daunting.” — Robert Ansell [via]

 

The Hermetic Library Reading Room is an imaginary and speculative future reification of the library in the physical world, a place to experience a cabinet of curiosities offering a confabulation of curation, context and community that engages, archives and encourages a living Western Esoteric Tradition. If you would like to contribute to the Hermetic Library Reading Room, consider supporting the library or contact the librarian.

The Magic Seal of Dr John Dee

The Magic Seal of Dr. John Dee. The Sigillum Dei Aemeth by Hermetic Library fellow Colin Campbell, the 2009 hardcover limited to 777 copies from Teitan Press, is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

Colin Campbell The Magic Seal of Dr John Dee from Teitan Press

The Magic Seal of John Dee comprises a detailed examination of the history and structure of the Sigillum Dei Aemeth of the Elizabethan scholar and Magus, Dr. John Dee, as well as a study of its use in the practice of ritual magic. The appendixes include a new transcription and translation of Dee’s Liber Mysteriorum Secundus, and an important new translation of the section of the famous grimoire, The Sworn Book of Honorius, that gives details of what is clearly a precursor of the Sigillum Dei. From the standpoint of a practicing magician, the work has two clear aims: to demonstrate the importance of the pattern established by Dee’s Sigillum Dei as opposed to its implementation, and to bring the Sigillum Dei out of the limited confines of the Enochian temple and into its role as a powerful magickal system in its own right. The recognition of the patterns established in the construction of the Sigillum Dei allow us to view the seal in a new light, not as a static framework decided once and for all hundreds of years ago in the study of a Renaissance magician, but as one that can be reconstituted in the light of modern interpretation. Furthermore, the seal is, in essence, a system of evocation — the very same method of communication used by Dee & Kelley in its reception. This book explains the nature and method of this approach and how the practicing magician is able to use the Sigillum Dei in the manner in which it was truly intended — as a powerful system of planetary magick.” [via]

 

The Hermetic Library Reading Room is an imaginary and speculative future reification of the library in the physical world, a place to experience a cabinet of curiosities offering a confabulation of curation, context and community that engages, archives and encourages a living Western Esoteric Tradition. If you would like to contribute to the Hermetic Library Reading Room, consider supporting the library or contact the librarian.

Aleister Crowley and the Aeon of Horus

Aleister Crowley and the Aeon of Horus: History. Magick. Psychedelia. Ufology. by Paul Weston, the 2009 paperback from Avalonian Aeon Publications, is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

Paul Weston's Aleister Crowley and the Aeon of Horus from Avalonian Aeon Publications

“Whilst ‘dealing with diverse and extraordinary subjects,’ this book focuses particularly on the Beast, and the various individuals, movements and madnesses that have followed on from him. Discussions of Crowley, Thelema, magick, and mysticism lead to explorations of the life and thought of Gerald Gardner, Kenneth Grant, L. Ron Hubbard, Timothy Leary, Jack Parsons, Robert Anton Wilson and others. The author also explores a number of bizarre and sometimes bewildering subjects, from the atom bomb and hallucinogens, to Nazi occultism, UFO’s and ‘the Sirius Mystery’, with various divergences and forays into sixties popular culture, Illuminati, Men in Black, the Church of Satan, the Process Church, Manson murders, the Thule Society, ‘New Aeon English Qabalah’, and the alleged secret United States government research into time travel said to have been conducted at Montauk Air Force Station. One reviewer has not unreasonably likened the work to that of Robert Anton Wilson on account of its scope and sometimes deliberately surreal perspectives.” [via]

 

The Hermetic Library Reading Room is an imaginary and speculative future reification of the library in the physical world, a place to experience a cabinet of curiosities offering a confabulation of curation, context and community that engages, archives and encourages a living Western Esoteric Tradition. If you would like to contribute to the Hermetic Library Reading Room, consider supporting the library or contact the librarian.

A couple entries about Crowley’s birthday today

A couple entries about Crowley’s birthday today at “A Tribute – Merry Crowleymas!” and “ALEISTER CROWLEY

“As fate would have it this year, Canadian Thanksgiving falls smack on Aleister Crowley’s birthday. I am actually thankful for this pioneering force in the Occult Community. Even if I find some of his work a little self-serving, it has ultimately added to the tapestry of magickal practices and theories.” [via]

“Mountaineer, fiendish hedonist, and magus incandescent, ALEISTER CROWLEY (1875–1947) remains one of the more remarkable figures of Edwardian letters, though his peculiar reputation makes a frank assessment of the man a rare thing. Between his public infamy as an obscene heretic — the ‘wickedest man in the world’   and the claustrophobic subcult of antinomian occultists that continue to adore him as the prophet of the magickal religion of Thelema, Crowley remains a man set too far apart from the central currents of his age. Whatever else he did, Crowley was a productive, powerful, and often brilliant writer …” [via]