Tag Archives: Arthur Rimbaud

Lark in the Morning

Lark in the Morning: The Verses of the Troubadours, a Bilingual Edition by Robert Kehew, with both French and English, translations by Ezra Pound, W D Snodgrass and Robert Kehew, a 2005 paperback from University of Chicago Press, is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

Robert Kehew Lark in the Morning from University of Chicago Press

“Although the troubadours flourished at the height of the Middle Ages in southern France, their songs of romantic love, with pleasing melodies and intricate stanzaic patterns, have inspired poets and song writers ever since, from Dante to Chaucer, from Renaissance sonneteers to the Romantics, and from Verlaine and Rimbaud to modern rock lyricists. Yet despite the incontrovertible influence of the troubadours on the development of both poetry and music in the West, there existed no comprehensive anthology of troubadour lyrics that respected the verse form of the originals until now.

Lark in the Morning honors the meter, word play, punning, and sound effects in the troubadours’ works while celebrating the often playful, bawdy, and biting nature of the material. Here, Robert Kehew augments his own verse translations with those of two seminal twentieth-century poets—Ezra Pound and W. D. Snodgrass—to provide a collection that captures both the poetic pyrotechnics of the original verse and the astonishing variety of troubadour voices.” — back cover

 

“Now when I see the skylark lift
His wings for joy in dawn’s first ray
Then let himself, oblivious, drift
For all his heart is glad and gay,
Ay! such great envies seize my thought
To see the rapture others find,
I marvel that desire does not
Consume away this heart of mine.”
—from “The Skylark” by Bernart de Ventadorn, trans. W D Snodgrass

 

Abraxas: Issue 4

Abraxas: Issue 4, edited by Christina Oakley Harrington and Robert Ansell, from Fulgur, is due to release on September 20th, 2013, which includes many new works, features a 30 page facsimile, a previously unpublished manuscript, of Fragmentum by Austin Osman Spare, and more.

Fulgur's Abraxas: Issue 4

Abraxas Issue #4 offers 192 large format pages of essays, poetry, interviews and art.

Printed using state-of-the-art offset lithography to our usual high standard, contributions for Abraxas #4 include a previously unpublished manuscript by Austin Osman Spare entitled Fragmentum presented here in facsimile over 30 pages; a special feature on the Italian artist and mystic Agostino Arrivabene; dramatic images of urban vodou from photographer Shannon Taggart; an interview by Sarah Victoria Turner with Christine Ödlund that discusses her art practice, synaesthesia and Theosophy; explorations of the symbolism of the tarot Fool from Valentin Wolfstein, an experiment in urban sigils from the London-based artist Francesca Ricci, and more.

CONTENTS

Dancing under the Stars: Ficino’s Way of Harmony, Ruth Clydesdale
Tabula Impressa, Francesca Ricci
Häxan II, Savanna Snow
Aleister Crowley, Marie de Miramar & the True Wanga, Christopher Josiffe
After the Flood, Arthur Rimbaud, translated by Robert Yates
Interview with Christine Ödlund, Sarah Victoria Turner
Demons in the Coliseum, Benvenuto Cellini

SPECIAL FEATURE: Agostino Arrivabene
From the Mystery of Passage, Gerd Lindner
That Sense of Becoming, Agostino Arrivabene interviewed by Robert Ansell

Basement Vodou, Shannon Taggart, with an introduction by Pam Grossman
Dawn, Arthur Rimbaud, translated by Robert Yates
Untitled, Susu Laroche
An Introduction to the Alchemical Mercurius, Paul Cowlan
Fragmentum, Austin Osman Spare
The Mystery of the Rose Cross, Anne Crossey
Observation of Ancestral Mysteries, Ron Regé, Jr.
Nowhere Less Now, Ole Hagen & Lindsay Seers
The Mystic Fool: From Tarot to an Ideal of Ascendance, Valentin Wolfstein
The Library Angel and Her Oracle, Justin Patrick Moore
bagua: inner lunarism, Peter Dyde” [via]