Tag Archives: autobiography

Kitchen Witch

Kitchen Witch: A Memoir by Cora Anderson, from Harpy Books, is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

Cora Anderson Kitchen Witch from Harpy Books

“An Inspiring Recollection from a Beloved Craft Elder

A personal narrative filled with homespun wisdom, this memoir recounts the life and times of one of the foremost elders of the Fairy (Feri) Faith of the Old Religion. Her journey proceeds from an impoverished childhood in rural Alabama before the Great Depression, to her marriage to the blind poet and shaman Victor H. Anderson and their life together as co-teachers of the Feri Tradition. This warm, intimate, and bittersweet autobiography provides a glimpse into the world of a true American kitchen Witch, and includes her recipes, personal spells, and poetry.” — back cover

Childhood Memories

Childhood Memories by Cora Anderson, foreword by Michele Jackson, from Acorn Guild Press, is part of the collection at the Reading Room. (Anderson Feri Tradition materials are now from the related Harpy Books imprint.)

Cora Anderson Childhood Memories from Acorn Guild Press

“An Intimate Self-Portrait from America’s Most Beloved Craft Elder

‘That night I had a very strange experience. I lay on my bed, half-awake and half-asleep. I glanced toward the window and saw a most delightful sight—there was the most beautiful creature I had ever seen. Before me was a real fairy. She was about a foot tall and very slender. She looked like a tiny golden girl, with blond hair and sparkling blue eyes.’

THrough sharing personal narrative and spiritual insight, Cora Anderson takes us on a journey from her impoverished childhood in rural Alabama to her marriage to the blind poet and shaman Victor H Anderson. During their 57-year marriage, the Andersons developed a vibrant and powerful Craft tradition that has touched countless lives.

This warm, intimate, and sometimes humorous memoir recounts the life of a true American original. Included are some of Cora’s recipes, personal spells, and all of her poetry. Her story is unlike any you have read before, one that will stay with you long after you have turned the last page.” — flap copy

The History of My Life, Volumes 3 & 4

Hermetic Library fellow T Polyphilus reviews History of My Life, Volumes 3 & 4 by Giacomo Casanova, translated by Willard R. Trask.

Giacomo Casanova Willard Trask History of My Life, Volumes 3 & 4

This huge memoir is as entertaining as any novel, and certainly a whole lot longer! Each volume in the eminently readable Willard Trask translation is 300 to 350 pages long, plus copious endnotes with literary, historical, geographical, and biographical explications.

Casanova’s exploits as a Freemason, faux-Rosicrucian, alchemist and magical confidence-man all rest within a larger context, where the freethinker and libertine seems to have enjoyed a genuine conviction of the reality of his personal daimonic genius. Writing of his first hardships as a prisoner, Casanova reflects, “My Genius diverted himself in this fashion in order to give me the pleasure of making comparisons.” The name of this Guardian Angel was
P A R A L I S. [via]

The Confessions of Aleister Crowley

The Confessions of Aleister Crowley: An Autohagiography, edited by John Symonds and Kenneth Grant, the 1971 paperback from Bantam Books, is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

John Symonds Kenneth Grant Aleister The Confessions of Aleister Crowley from  Bantam Books

This is the first paperback edition of the single volume redaction of the multivolume The Spirit of Solitude, “re-Antichristianed” The Confessions of Aleister Crowley, which still has not been published beyond the first two volumes, and, in spite of the ad copy, this is, indeed, still an abridgement of the sourcework. Publication of the complete Confessions might, maybe, finally begin with volume 1 available sometime in 2013.

“Complete and Unabridged—The Profane and Uninhibited Memoirs of the Most Notorious Magician, Satanist and Drug Cultist of the 20th Century.”

“Aleister Crowley called himself ‘Beast 666’ and was a self-proclaimed saint of the Gnostic Church. He became a ‘god’ in his own temple at the age of forty-five. By that time, he was infamous in several countries as a writer, poet, painter, chess expert, master magician, mountaineer, drug addict and satyr.

Born in England in 1875, the sone of a wealthy brewer, Crowley totally rejected the Victorian hypocrisy of his day and dedicated himself to a life of debauchery, evil, Satanic spells and writing, especially on such topics as sex, magic and occultism.

A notorious pleasure-seeker, Crowley truly was the hippie of his age, ‘doing his thing.’ He was banned from Italy and was forced to leave other countries, always under mysterious circumstances. Crowley was a constant user of heroin, cocaine, opium, hashish and peyote, and early in his life earned a reputation for indulging in wild sex and drug orgies which he combined with his so-called religious rites.

his reputation followed him everywhere as he traveled from country to country, practicing witchcraft and black magic with his strange group of mistresses and eccentrics.

Colourful, feared, despised and admired, Crowley brought excitement and evil with him wherever he went. He was the author of several books, treatises and poems, many of which are widely read and appreciated today.”

“Aleister Crowley was poet, painter, writer, master chess player, lecher, drug addict and magician. his contemporary press called him ‘the wickedest man in the world.’ The most bizarre and notorious figure of his age, Crowley’s own story is now available in paperback from the first time.

But The Confessions of Aleister Crowley is more than just the autobiography of a man. It is also the portrait of an age. Everything is set down just as Crowley experienced it.

In addition to being a famed magician, Crowley also had a well-deserved reputation as a writer. his flair for literature and his gusto for life elevate this books several levels above the ordinary ‘confession’ type of literature prevalent in his day.

His writing is crisp, witty and amusing and always fascinating. Crowley believed that he could do anything he set his mind to. And he’ll make a believer out of you.”

 

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