Tag Archives: book of revelation

The Rule of Colel and Manuscript 2344

Walter C Cambra has sent “The Rule of Colel and Manuscript 2344” which is now in the collection at the Reading Room. This essay explores the topic of a manuscript with the number of the beast from Revelation 13:18 as 665 and since the “rule of colel” offers “one unit can be added to, or subtracted from. the gematria value of a word” that there is a simple equivalency resolution to the apparent difference from the “better attested and well-known ‘666’”.

Walter C Cambra The Rule of Colel and Manuscript 2344

The Book of Revelation: Deciphered

The Book of Revelation: Deciphered by Walter C Cambra, a 1985 monograph, has arrived at the Reading Room courtesy of the author.

Walter C Cambra The Book of Revelation: Deciphered

“After detailed reading and analysis of The Book of Revelation, a deciphering of the enigmatic style and symbols reveals the work to be an esoteric account of the Jewish captivity in Babylon during the reign of Neo-Babylonian kings from Nebuchadnezzer through Belshazzar, when the Jewish House of Jesus returned to the New Jerusalem after Babylon was conquered by the Persians and Medes.”

Gog and Magog

Gog and Magog: a Study in Thematic Clarification by Walter C Cambra, a 1996 monograph, has arrived at the Reading Room courtesy of the author.

Walter C Cambra Gog and Magog

“The apocalyptic canonical books of Daniel and Revelation are the cornerstone works upon which fundamentalists right-wing Christian evangelists base their fiery oratory. Among the numerous highly charged notions in these two works the letting loose of Satan is skillfully employed by these evangelists to instill their audience with apocalyptic inebriation.”

“A key point of apocalyptic literary reality is that all events that eventually transpire upon the earth are linked to events that originate and are resolved in heaven.”

Love Sex Fear Death

Hermetic Library fellow T Polyphilus reviews Love, Sex, Fear, Death: The Inside Story of The Process Church of the Final Judgment by Timothy Wyllie, edited by Adam Parfrey, from Feral House.

Timothy Wyllie Adam Parfrey Love Sex Fear Death from Feral House

I had previously read W.S. Bainbridge’s study of the Process Church, titled Satan’s Power, in my quest for information on this fascinating cult with roots in Scientology, Christian apocalypticism, and Western occultism. While Bainbridge’s book was helpful, and probably the best account in print at that time, the Feral House multiple memoir and archival anthology Love Sex Fear Death totally puts it in the shade by furnishing insider dope from a variety of personal perspectives, along with organizational literature, glossy color propaganda reproductions, and photos of key players.

The words of the title, while seeming to offer two independent clauses in the imperative mood, were titles of four themed issues of The Process magazine, which have their cover art and various contents reproduced in the second part of this book. Roughly the first half of the volume is the Processean memoir of Timothy Wyllie, onetime designer and editor of The Process, an early and enduring member who was part of the group’s inner circle, but who—according to his own account—always occupied a marginal position relative to the group’s social core and theological identities. Following Wyllie’s piece are an assortment of shorter reflections and reports from former Processeans. Between these and the archival reprints, there is an essay by Genesis P-Orridge regarding the Process Church influence on TOPY, and the ways in which TOPY history reflected its predecessor.

Reading these stories certainly de-glamorized the Process for me to a considerable degree, I had less sympathy for their internal practices and mores than brief previous exposures had led me to think I would. The Process Church of the Final Judgment is a sort of “kissing cousin” to Thelema, as demonstrated by their harmonization in TOPY, and by the fact that the first chartered master of an O.T.O. camp of my acquaintance was a former Processean with very fond memories of his time in the Process. They paid their wry respects to the Beast in various events and publications, and their psychological theories were keyed to the work of Adler, whom Crowley noted as the best of the psychoanalytic pioneers of his own period. The Process was also a notable feature of the Chicago counterculture, having had a conspicuous presence in this area from their first efforts to spread in the US (circa 1970) until the eventual quiet implosion of their successor group the Foundation in 1976.

Still, the old Process literature continues to impress with its bravura. The archival materials here also include sheet music for some charming Processean liturgical tunes, like “Christ and Satan Joined in Unity.” The varied memoirs, while sometimes pointing up the shortcomings of the organization and its leaders, still show the nobility of the aspirations among the membership, and their ability to benefit from radical social experimentation. This is an excellent collection for anyone interested in new religious movements generally, and the countercultural moment of the 1960s and 70s particularly. [via]

The Numbers of the Beast and the House of Yeshua

The Numbers of the Beast and the House of Yeshua by Walter C Cambra is a 2013 monograph, which proposes Nero Caesar of 1st C c.e. as the referent for 666 in Revelation 13:18. which arrived courtesy of the author and is now part of the collection at the Reading Room.

Walter C Cambra The Numbers of the Beast and the House of Yesua

Revelations: Visions, Prophecy, and Politics in the Book of Revelation

You may be interested in Revelations: Visions, Prophecy, and Politics in the Book of Revelation by Elaine Pagels, due for release in a couple of days.

“Through the bestselling books of Elaine Pagels, thousands of readers have come to know and treasure the suppressed biblical texts known as the Gnostic Gospels. As one of the world’s foremost religion scholars, she has been a pioneer in interpreting these books and illuminating their place in the early history of Christianity. Her new book, however, tackles a text that is firmly, dramatically within the New Testament canon: The Book of Revelation, the surreal apocalyptic vision of the end of the world . . . or is it?

In this startling and timely book, Pagels returns The Book of Revelation to its historical origin, written as its author John of Patmos took aim at the Roman Empire after what is now known as ‘the Jewish War,’ in 66 CE. Militant Jews in Jerusalem, fired with religious fervor, waged an all-out war against Rome’s occupation of Judea and their defeat resulted in the desecration of Jerusalem and its Great Temple. Pagels persuasively interprets Revelation as a scathing attack on the decadence of Rome. Soon after, however, a new sect known as “Christians” seized on John’s text as a weapon against heresy and infidels of all kinds-Jews, even Christians who dissented from their increasingly rigid doctrines and hierarchies.

In a time when global religious violence surges, Revelations explores how often those in power throughout history have sought to force ‘God’s enemies’ to submit or be killed. It is sure to appeal to Pagels’s committed readers and bring her a whole new audience who want to understand the roots of dissent, violence, and division in the world’s religions, and to appreciate the lasting appeal of this extraordinary text.”