Tag Archives: casting a spell

Babalon Working

This video is a trailer for Brian Butler’s “Babalon Working” posted by MOCAtv. There was a screening on Sept 19th, which means this is a belated mention, but you can be on the lookout for the next showing.

“MOCAtv Presents a Screening and Performance Event by Los Angeles Artist BRIAN BUTLER at MOCA Grand Avenue, September 19th, 2013.

World Premiere of Brian Butler’s Preternatural Odyssey film BABALON WORKING featuring Paz de la Huerta and the performance TRANSMIGRATION.

To occult artist Brian Butler, aesthetics are ‘magick.’ Elevating mystic practices to the status of art—or elevating art to the status of ritual—Butler’s films and performances are themselves Orphic ceremonies and Satanic rites. Pentagrams, triangles, liturgical hoods in red, white, and black, these iconographic shapes and costumes have a sacred as well as aesthetic function. The arresting imagery and trance-inducing editing of his latest short film The Babalon Working: a Shortcut to Initiation are no exception. Butler’s mentor and collaborator Kenneth Anger once compared making a movie to casting a spell. Perhaps this film will make that assertion literal: The Babalon Working was a ritual devised and practiced by occult master Jack Parsons to manifest Babalon, the divine feminine. Watch and wait.”

Kenneth Anger is pulled out of a hat in an article about the cliche “the magic of the movies”

Kenneth Anger is pulled out of a hat in an article about the cliché “the magic of the movies” at “Hugo and the magic of film trickery” by J Hoberman at The Guardian. Aleister Crowley is tangentially mentioned in connection with Anger.

“Many film-makers, including Orson Welles and the avant-gardists Maya Deren, Harry Smith, Stan Brakhage, and Kenneth Anger, identified their practice with magic — albeit in varying ways. Welles had extensive experience as a stage magician and made his last feature, the faux documentary F is For Fake precisely about cinematic sleight of hand; Deren was a serious student of Haitian vodoo; Smith considered his cut and paste animations a form of alchemy; Brakhage referred to “trick” as the medium’s fundamental rule; and Anger was a disciple of Aleister Crowley, who considered making a film akin to casting a spell. (Walt Disney would have agreed.)”

“Movies don’t necessarily record reality but they always construct it. That’s what makes them magical.”