Tag Archives: Clay Holden

Enochian Vision Magick

Hermetic Library fellow T Polyphilus reviews Enochian Vision Magick: An Introduction and Practical Guide to the Magick of Dr. John Dee and Edward Kelley by Lon Milo DuQuette, forward by Clay Holden (of the John Dee Publication Project).

Lon Milo DuQuette Clay Holden Enochian Vision Magick

There sure have been a lot of books published on the topic of Enochiana—understood generally as the system of angelic magic derived from the work of the Elizabethans John Dee and Edward Kelly. I count over twenty in my personal library alone. Many of these are historical, focusing on the primary materials from Dee and Kelly; while others are practical, offering instructions to contemporary aspirants and practitioners. Never before has there been a book that combines the two in such an accessible and sensible manner.

Lon Milo DuQuette is a storyteller, and his understanding of magick demands, and thus offers, the narrative framework so often missing from not only the modern practitioner approach, but also that of the source text analyst. His tale synthesizes the confusingly atomized objects and texts of angelic magic, placing them in a developmental sequence, and assessing their importance in the origins and fulfillment of Enochian praxis. His story does not end in the 17th century: the book is full of anecdotes about his own work and that of other living magicians, characterized by the humor and humility that are DuQuette’s trademark as an authority on esoteric subjects.

These stories are complemented by the necessary technical detail for anyone who wishes to use this book as a practical reference in actual work. And for those whose bent is toward research, the overview indicates all of the principal texts and topics of the angelic corpus, as the heads of so many fascinating trails. In my view, this book makes obsolete every previous “beginner” book on the topic, and is itself likely to hold a focal place in the bibliography for years to come. And along with its success as a primer, Enochian Vision Magick includes original reflection and inventive technique, so that veterans of the tablets and aires are sure to find food for thought among its pages. [via]

Omnium Gatherum: Feb 12th, 2014

An irregular hodgepodge of links gathered together …

David Richard Jones The Circumference and the Hieroglyphic Monad
Hermetic Library fellow David Richard JonesThe Circumference and the Hieroglyphic Monad, part III of his In Operibus Sigillo Dei Aemeth, and is based on an observation by Clay Holden, of The John Dee Publication Project, that “the geometry of the Monad as analyzed and expected in Theorem XXIII when applied to a circle subdivides the circumference of a circle into seven equal divisions with almost perfect elegance.”

 

  • Lon Milo DuQuette’s “I’m Scared” is a new political single.

  • Aleister Crowley’s invocation to coffee, recorded in his diaries, was recently a randomly popular old post.

    “O coffee! By the mighty Name of Power do I invoke thee, consecrating thee to the Service of the Magic of Light. Let the pulsations of my heart be strong and regular and slow! Let my brain be wakeful and active in its supreme task of self-control! That my desired end may be effected through Thy strength, Adonai, unto Whom be the Glory for ever! Amen without lie, and Amen, and Amen of Amen.”

  • Earliest footprints outside Africa discovered in Norfolk” — Pallab Ghosh, BBC News; from the wonder-what-the-sea-washed-away-the-other-291999999-days-we-weren’t-watching dept.

    “The footprints are more than 800,000 years old and were found on the shores of Happisburgh. … The sea has now washed away the prints – but not before they were recorded”

  • Lake of beer prayer attributed to St Brigid, via T Thorn Coyle; from the has-Ra-finally-gotten-Sekhmet-to-chill-out-yet dept.

    “I’d sit with the men, the women of God
    There by the lake of beer.
    We’d be drinking good health forever
    And every drop would be a prayer.”

  • Archaeologists Have Found the Oldest Roman Temple” — Alice Robb, New Republic; from the exploring-ancient-temples-hidden-under-watery-depths-in-spite-of-Lovecraft dept.

    “Archaeologists have long suspected that the oldest Roman temple lay at the foot of the legendary Capitoline Hill, but it’s only recently that they’ve managed to excavate the waterlogged Sant’Omobono site with modern techniques.

    ‘The temple’s much more interesting than anybody expected,’ said Albert Ammerman, an archaeologist at Colgate University who worked on the dig. ‘It’s beautiful down there.'”

  • Mysteria Misc. Maxima: February 7th, 2014” — Sarah Veale, Invocatio blog; from the πάντα-ῥεῖ dept.

    “This will be the last MMM for the foreseeable future. … So please join me in bidding a fond adieu to the MMM and enjoy this final link round-up…”

  • On the Arbitrary Appellation of Magic in Antiquity” — Sarah Veale, Invocatio; from the i-am-large-i-contain-multitudes dept.

    “While a good definition suggests that magical practices are rites and rituals that exist on the margins of cultural norms (Dickie, 38), the point is that, when we look at the evidence, what is labelled magic is a moving target. The label stays the same, but the content changes depending on the situation at hand. The label is not so much about the practices themselves, but rather about the status of those practices.”

  • The Ritual of the Duck” — Sarah Anne Lawless; from the together-with-all-the-appurtenances-thereto dept.

    “Yesterday I made Aves Flying Ointment. A recipe I created a couple of years ago combining the traditional herbs with the more grisly shapeshifting ingredients of bird fat, bird bone dust, and feather ashes.”

  • Tveir Hrafnar: Sorcery in Silver” — Sarah Anne Lawless; from the my-precious dept.

    SAL: Your work is a wonderful rarity in that it caters to occultists, sorcerers, and traditional witches who most jewelers ignore in favour of the much bigger market of neopagans. Was this intentional or were you simply following your influences and passions?
    AW: Mostly following my passions and influences. I am self centered in my art and would rather make what speaks to me than what I think the market would buy. It’s a ‘go for what you know’ kind of thing. Hopefully there are enough folks out there with similar aesthetics and interests to keep things rolling.”

  • Read Sappho’s ‘new’ poem” — Tim Whitmarsh, The Guardian; from the he-said-she-said dept

    “They whose fortune the king of Olympus wishes
    Now to turn from trouble
    to [ … ] are blessed
    and lucky beyond compare.”

  • A New Sapphic Poem ~ Wading into the Morass” — David Meadows, rogueclassicism; from the he-said-she-maybe-said dept.

    “In case you haven’t heard, Dirk Obbink has recently announced the discovery/publication of two ‘new’ poems by Sappho and they’re causing quite the flurry of activity on blogospheres (as you may have already seen), twitterspheres (ditto), and no doubt, in private emails and departmental coffee lounges around the world.”

  • Charlemagne’s bones are (probably) real” — The Local; from the dem-dry-bones dept.

    “Researchers confirmed on Wednesday evening — 1,200 years to the day since Charlemagne died — that the 94 bones and bone fragments taken from the supposed resting place of the King of the Franks and founder of what was to become the Holy Roman Empire came from a tall, thin, older man.”

  • Charlemagne’s bones found in his coffin” — The History Blog; from the in-the-last-place-you-looked dept.

    “That may seem obvious, but given how often he was exhumed and reburied and parts of him given away as relics, it’s actually quite notable that the collection of bones in the Karlsschrein, the Shrine of Charlemagne, and other reliquaries in the Aachen Cathedral all appear to come from the same person who matches contemporary descriptions of the Frankish king.”

  • Babylonian Tale of Round Ark Draws Ire From Christian Circles” — Alan Boyle, NBC News; from the ark-you-glad-you-to-see-me-or-is-that-a-clay-tablet-in-your-pocket dept.

    “A recently deciphered 4,000-year-old clay tablet from ancient Mesopotamia is putting a new spin on the biblical tale of the flood and Noah’s Ark — and that’s causing consternation among some Christian fundamentalists.”

  • Hermetic Library anthology artist Arthur Loves Plastic‘s new Get Happy.

  • Cranky Roman Guy on The Golden Globes; from the plus-ça-change-plus-c’est-la-même-chose dept.

    “If you doubted that this is the age of Discord reigning supreme, you have an annual rite in which you give #GoldenGlobes to beautiful women.”

  • A Preliminary Analysis of the Botany, Zoology, and Mineralogy of the Voynich Manuscript” — A O Tucker et al.; from the-effect-of-gamma-rays-on-man-in-the-moon-marigolds dept.

    “We note that the style of the drawings in the Voynich Ms. is similar to 16th century codices from Mexico (e.g., Codex Cruz-Badianus). With this prompt, we have identified a total of 37 of the 303 plants illustrated in the Voynich Ms. (roughly 12.5% of the total), the six principal animals, and the single illustrated mineral. The primary geographical distribution of these materials, identified so far, is from Texas, west to California, south to Nicaragua, pointing to a botanic garden in central Mexico, quite possibly Huaztepec (Morelos). A search of surviving codices and manuscripts from Nueva España in the 16th century, reveals the calligraphy of the Voynich Ms. to be similar to the Codex Osuna (1563-1566, Mexico City). Loan-words for the plant and animal names have been identified from Classical Nahuatl, Spanish, Taino, and Mixtec. The main text, however, seems to be in an extinct dialect of Nahuatl from central Mexico, possibly Morelos or Puebla.”

  • Norse Rune code cracked” — Medievalists.net; about “Ráð þat, If You Can!” — K Jonas Norby; from the missed-it-missed-it dept.

    “‘It’s like solving a puzzle,’ said Nordby to the Norwegian website forskning.no. ‘Gradually I began to see a pattern in what was apparently meaningless combinations of runes.’

    However, those thinking that the coded runes will reveal deep secrets of the Norse will be disappointed. The messages found so far seem to be either used in learning or have a playful tone. In one case the message was ‘Kiss me’. Nordby explains ‘We have little reason to believe that rune codes should hide sensitive messages, people often wrote short everyday messages.’

    In many instances those who wrote the coded runes also left comments urging the readers to try to figure it out. Sometimes they would also boast of their abilities at writing the codes.”

  • O D fuckin abbot.” — Medium Ævum; from the orking-cows dept.

    O D fuckin abbot

  • Hollywood Calls” — Feral House; from the your-name-will-go-up-in-bright-lights dept.

    “Since we’re in Hollywood we’ve signed an option agreement for a Sundance Channel television series based on the Feral House book, Sex and Rockets, about the occult rocket scientist Jack Parsons.”

  • The end of Yeats: work and women in his last days in France” — Lara Marlowe, Irish Times; from the speak-before-your-breath-is-done dept.

    “Like his alter ego Cuchulain in the play he had just written, Yeats was dying surrounded by women.”

Enochian Vision Magick

Enochian Vision Magick: An Introduction and Practical Guide to the Magick of Dr. John Dee and Edward Kelley by Lon Milo DuQuette, with foreword by Clay Holden (of the John Dee Publication Project at the library), the 2008 paperback from Weiser Books, is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

Lon Milo DuQuette's Enochian Vision Magick from Weiser Books

“Dr. John Dee (1527–1608) was one of the greatest minds of the Elizabethan Age, and his system of angelic communication was the result of the most dramatic magical operation ever recorded. It has survived to become the cornerstone of the modern ceremonial magician’s practice. In 1582 Dee and his clairvoyant partner Edward Kelley made magical contact with a number of spiritual entities who identified themselves as angels — the same that communicated with Adam, Enoch, and the patriarchs of the Old Testament. Over the next three years they revealed to Dee and Kelley three distinct magical systems of vision magick. The third and last of these incorporated a series of ‘calls’ to be recited in an angelic language in order to raise the consciousness of the magician to a level where angelic contact is possible. Best-selling author and magician, Lon Milo DuQuette, who has practiced Dee’s system for over twenty-five years, has seized upon elements of the original Dee material overlooked by adepts of the Golden Dawn, Aleister Crowley, and other modern magicians, and brought them to light in Enochian Vision Magick. DuQuette offers the expert and novice alike the practical means by which they can become attuned in the same simple step-by-step manner that first prepared Dee and Kelley. There has never been a book on Enochian magick like this one.” [via]

 

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Part III: The Circumference and the Hieroglyphic Monad in In Operibus Sigillo Dei Aemeth by David Richard Jones.

“Curiously, and we have to wonder if it was known or unknown to Dee, the geometry of the Monad as analyzed and expected in Theorem XXIII when applied to a circle subdivides the circumference of a circle into seven equal divisions with almost perfect elegance. This finding was first made by Clay Holden, in whose debt we are for this important discovery and the initial geometric constructions demonstrating the figure.

This correlation of the Monad to the sevenfold division of the circle indicates that an intimate relationship may exist between the metaphysical formulae of Dee’s Monad and Sigillum, sevenfold division being the very foundation of the formulae of the Sigillum.” [via]

 

 

The Spirit Actions

Another section of David Richard Jones’ Invisible College was The Spirit Actions, a collection of texts from a project to create an online edition of John Dee and Edward Kelley’s “A TRUE & FAITHFUL RELATION OF What passed for many Yeers Between DR. JOHN DEE and SOME SPIRITS”:

“The Texts contained in this folder are part of a project, by various members of enochian-l@hollyfeld.com, to produce a web edition of A TRUE & FAITHFUL RELATION OF What passed for many Yeers Between DR. JOHN DEE and SOME SPIRITS: Those who have substantively contributed to this project are: Frater Adsum Iterum, Raymond Drewry, Susan Drewry, David R. Jones, Victor Marques and Patricia A. Shaffer. This notice should be included with any distribution or posting of this material. The Latin translations are copyright their respective translators.”

In addition to The Obsidian Mirror of John Dee and Edward Kelley, An Enochian Miscellany, as well as The Enochian World of Benjamin Rowe and Norton’s Imperium; there’s also Clay Holden’s John Dee Publication Project, mirrored at the Hermetic Library. Of course, there’s a lot of other material on the site related to this, which you can find using a site search, but some things you may want to check out “Enochian” and “John Dee” as a start.

Elsewhere online, you may also be interested in The John Dee Society which I’ve been told is still alive in spite of the apparent silence or Twilit Grotto’s Writings of John Dee.

The Elias Ashmole Award for Enochian Excellence on the Web

Back in the day, there were several sites that were honored with the Elias Ashmole Award for Enochian Excellence on the Web. These are recorded in the archives of David Richard Jones’ Invisible College site recently added to the Hermetic Library at Hermetic.com.

The awards were Parker Torrence on November 1997, Benjamin Rowe on December 1997, and Clay Holden on January 1998. There is a mirror of Clay Holden’s John Dee Publication Project and two significant archives of Benjamin Rowe’s materials from The Enochian World of Benjamin Rowe and Norton’s Imperium: Enochian Magick Papers & Links that are part of the Hermetic Library collection.

You may want to take a gander through the links on these award pages for a fascinating look at the active work that was being done online in those bygone days of yore, when the commercial Internet was only a few years old. There’s a lot of interesting materials and history here to be discovered and remembered.

In rescuing these pages, I have updated a few links which go to materials elsewhere in the collection of the Hermetic Library, but I’ve decided to keep links to other materials as they appear in snapshots available at the Wayback Machine. Without the luminary service provided by the Internet Archive this rescue of materials could not have happened, so, in the spirit of Awards for Excellence on the Web, I’ll take this moment to give my own kind of award of thanks for the service they have provided and continue to provide to the community and culture of the Internet.