Tag Archives: conference

NOTOCON X in Austin, TX on Aug 14-16th, 2015

The tenth biennial National Ordo Templi Conference (NOTOCON X) of US Grand Lodge, with the theme “Fire of Motion”, will be held in the Valley of Austin, TX on August 14 to 16th, 2015. The logo was done by Hermetic Library anthology artist Mustafa al-Laylah, and I’m also proud to say the library’s Hermetic Hosting is supporting this event with donated hosting for their conference event site.

NOTOCON X Fire of Motion 2015

“Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law.

Our dynamic regional community reflects the cultural diversity of Texas. The O.T.O. bodies in our area include people from all demographics and reflect the society around us.

When practicing magick in a conservative part of the country, we become each others’ support and confirmation of our chosen path. Practicing the radical philosophy of Thelema is a challenge that we share in as we raise our children, fight for freedom, and build our community.

Our theme expresses the heat of a southwestern summer, but more significantly how we achieve our Will while working, parenting, creating, and evolving as individuals, as well as in the Thelemic community and the red states we live in. New Mexico, Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas are part of our region.

So given our daily environment and all of its challenges, how do our Magical practices lead to personal change, meeting goals, and furthering our progress on a daily basis? How, specifically, has Thelema led to changes in people’s work places, families, and communities? How do we manifest the Law in our everyday lives, whether at work, play, or home? How do Thelemites handle the problems encountered in a predominantly Christian environment, especially in the work place and other areas where our philosophy of freedom conflicts with expectations of conformity?

Despite all the pitfalls, we thrive together, and our light can shine brightest in the darkness. We are families, we are lovers, we are seekers, we are teachers. We are husbands, sisters, children and crones. Above all, we are Magicians. We are the fire of Will as it manifests in the Love we share as we grow and change together. We are Fire in Motion.

We hope you will come on down to Texas and celebrate with us, but be forewarned: it’s gonna get hot in here!

Love is the law, love under will.”

Esoteric Book Conference 2014 on Sept 6th-7th

Esoteric Book Conference 2014 will be held on September 6th and 7th, 2014 in Seattle at the University of Washington, a new venue this year. Proposals are currently still being accepted, with art and speaker deadline on April 8th and with book signing and book launch proposal deadline on August 1st. Head over to the site for more details on that, and you can subscribe to their mailing list or follow on social media for future updates, if you like.

6th annual Esoteric Book Conference 2014

Fifth International Conference of the ASE on Jun 19-22nd, 2014 at Colgate University

The Fifth International Conference of the Association for the Study of Esotericism on June 19th–22nd, 2014 at Colgate University in Hamilton, New York. The conference schedule has recently been posted and you will find quite a few presenters and presentations of interest including a couple by Hermetic library fellows:

· Mark Stavish, Israel Regardie and the Theory and Practice of the Middle Pillar Exercise
· Joscelyn Godwin, Esotericism in a Murky Mirror: Strange Practices in Central New York.

Do check out the whole schedule, but a selection of the other presentations, that catch my eye, includes:

· John L Crow (Thelema Coast to Coast), The Theosophical Shift to the Visual: Graphical Representations of the Human Body in the Literature of Second and Third Generation Leadership in the Theosophical Society
· Simon Magus, The fin de siècle magical aesthetic of Austin Osman Spare: Siderealism, Atavism, Automatism, Occultism
· David Pecotic, Building Subtle Bodies — Gurdjieff’s esoteric practice of conditional immortality in the light of Poortman’s concept of hylic pluralism in the history of religions
· Richard Kaczynski, Inventing Tradition: The Construction of History, Lineage and Authority in Secret Societies
· Wouter Hanegraaff, The Transformation of Desire in Machen’s & Waite’s House of the Hidden Light
· Sarah Veale, Disenchantment of the Vampire: Balkan Folklore’s Deadly Encounter with Modernity
· Gordan Djurdjevic, “In Poison there is Physic”: On Poisons and Cures in Some Strands of Esoteric Theory and Practice.

Visions of Enchantment at Cambridge on Mar 17th-18th, 2014

Visions of Enchantment conference 2014

Visions of Enchantment: Occultism, Spirituality & Visual Culture is an international conference at University of Cambridge on March 17th-18th, 2014 [HT Erik Davis].

Additionally, although there is very little time left, you may be interested in the call for papers still open through October 31st, 2013.

“This two-day conference is a collaboration between the Department of History of Art, University of Cambridge and the Arts University Bournemouth and is organised in association with the European Society for the Study of Western Esotericism (ESSWE).

It seeks to investigate the formative role that occultism and spirituality have played in the creation of both Western and non-Western visual and material cultures. The conference aims to provide a stimulating platform for the presentation of innovative research in this field as well as to encourage dialogue and exchange between academics with a specific research interest in art and occultism.” [via]

 

“This two-day conference seeks to investigate the formative role that occultism and magic have played in Western and non-Western visual and material culture. It aims to present original research in this field as well as to establish a productive dialogue between academics with a particular research interest in occultism and visual culture.

We invite proposals from a variety of disciplines and perspectives, provided that they present innovative insights into visual, symbolic or material aspects of the esoteric tradition, covering a broad spectrum of geographic regions and historical periods.

Acceptable topics may include, but are by no means limited to, the following areas:

* Alchemy and Hermetic symbolism;
* Astrology and astrological illustrations;
* Witchcraft, black magic and sorcery;
* Talismans, totems, fetishes and other apotropaic objects;
* Occult aspects of Jewish, Christian and Islamic art;
* Theosophy and modern visual culture;
* The visual and material culture of other occult movements;
* Surrealism and the politics of the occult;
* Spirituality and occultism in other avant-garde movements;
* Occult art, counter-culture and radical politics;
* Women artists and the occult;
* Gendered, sexual and ‘queer’ ramifications of esoteric art;
* Photography, spiritism, séances and automatism;
* The supernatural in avant-garde cinema;
* Occultism and magic in contemporary visual culture.” [via]


A Day for Patricia Crowther at The Belgrave Rooms on Sun Apr 6th, 2014 in Nottingham

A Day for Patricia Crowther is a conference at The Belgrave Rooms on Sunday April 6th, 2014 in Nottingham, offered by the Centre for Pagan Studies and the Doreen Valiente Foundation [HT Sorita d’Este].

A Day for Patricia Crowther conference 2014

“A Witchcraft Conference in honour of PATRICIA CROWTHER, Sunday 6th April 2014, 10am-6pm, The Belgrave Rooms (Masonic Hall), Nottingham, with talks by: Vivianne & Chris Crowley, Rufus & Melissa Harrington, Philip Heselton, John Harper … plus the best in Pagan stalls & historic exhibition of Witchcraft Artefacts. Tickets are available at £15 each

We are continuing our series of ‘A Day For …’ events and this year we will be honouring the achievements and contribution to the Witchcraft and Pagan community of Patricia Crowther.

Patricia is one of the few remaining contemporaries of Gerald Gardner and has to be considered one of the true Elders of the Craft. She was initially reluctant to allow us to hold a day in her honour but we have persuaded her that the Craft and pagan communities deserve their chance to pay her their respects and celebrate her so we are very pleased to announce that all being well she will be our guest of honour on the day.

We will also present talks by Vivianne & Chris Crowley, Rufus & Melissa Harrington, Philip Heselton and Patricia’s good friend and astronomy expert, John Harper.

This year we have taken note of past comments and decided to hold the conference out of London. Nottingham has played a part in the modern history of the Craft and is close to Patricia’s home town of Sheffield. Nottingham boasts a lively Pagan community, being the home of Pagan Pride whose volunteers will be on duty to support our event with us and our other major supporter, GreenMantle magazine.

As a venue we have chosen the grandoise and magnificent Masonic Halls called locally ‘The Belgrave Rooms’ which is on the tramline outside Nottingham Trent University less than 5 minutes walk from the city centre’s Market Square. On-street parking in Nottingham is readily available and Sunday rates are £1 per day on the meters.

The doors will open at 10 and close at 6, there will be refreshments and lunch available (you should be able to book your lunch on arrival) and we’ll have a selection of invited Pagan stalls as well as an exhibition from the Doreen Valiente Collection which will be ‘enhanced’ with some on-loan artefacts as well.

Tickets are priced at £15 and all the booking information is available on the Doreen Valiente website. And if you sign up as a Doreen Valiente Foundation member you will receive discounts on tickets and information about other opportunities during the conference weekend.” [via]

Ferdinando Buscema: magic, wonder, and Boing Boing: Ingenuity

Ferdinando Buscema: magic, wonder, and Boing Boing: Ingenuity” [HT Phil Legard, also] is a video including features of interest such as Erik Davis’ TechGnosis: Myth, Magic, and Mysticism in the Age of Information, David B Metcalfe’s Lullian wheel, Robert Anton Wilson, the art of memory, & more of relevant interest peppered throughout; culminated by an invocation of the accomplishment of the Great Work.

“Ferdinando Buscema is a magic experience designer whose work draws from mechanical engineering, sleight-of-hand, and his explorations of hermetic traditions. We couldn’t have asked for a more astonishing opening presentation at Boing Boing: Ingenuity, our theatrical experience that took place at a former Masonic Lodge in San Francisco on August 18. During his performance, video above, Buscema revealed the final secret of the Illuminati, and guessed my password, which I have since changed. We look forward to future collaborations with Ferdinando whose wizardry and warmth is an inspiration to Happy Mutants everywhere! Get illuminated.”

Neo-Symbolist Salon at Corrala Cultural Center in Madrid from Oct 31-Nov 30, 2013

Neo-Symbolist Salon: For the Beauty and Spirit in Art will be held at the Corrala Cultural Center in Madrid, Spain from October 31st through November 30th, 2013 as part of the fifth Madrid Gothic Week [HT Sasha Chaitow]. The call for artist and papers has passed, but it sounds quite interesting; especially since the description explicitly invokes the Salon de la Rose + Croix of Joséphin Péladan and has suggested themes which include Beautiful, Decadent and Damned; Hybrid beings; The Sacred Feminine; and more.

Neo-Symbolist Salon 2013

“V SEMANA GÓTICA DE MADRID
SGM ART
CONVOCATORIA PARA PARTICIPAR EN EL

I Salón Neo-Simbolista

Por la Belleza y el Espíritu en el Arte

DEL 31 DE OCTUBRE AL 30 DE NOVIEMBRE DE 2013
CENTRO CULTURAL LA CORRALA (MADRID)

El final del siglo XIX vio florecer un arte plagado de ideal y de profundo significado: el Simbolismo. Un arte de la belleza y la pureza de las formas bajo cuyo velo había siempre un significado profundo: sus imágenes simbolizaban el ideal. Por ello fueron llamados en su momento “los pintores del alma”. Pero el advenimiento de las primeras Vanguardias dejó eclipsada a esta corriente artística tan rica y evocadora, tan solo revivida por el ámbito surrealista, y que sólo será estudiada a partir de los años 80.

Es significativo que un siglo más tarde, en el final del siglo XX y comienzos del XXI toda una serie de artistas haya recuperado la estética y los iconos del Simbolismo finisecular para mostrar unos ideales nuevos. La femme fatal, el dandy, el andrógino, pasan a representar nuevos conceptos y nuevos ideales, eso sí, dentro del ámbito de la contra-cultura. A este movimiento artístico contemporáneo es a lo que llamamos Neo-Simbolismo, los nuevos pintores del alma.

Y por esa ascendencia decimonónica nos fijamos en el París decadente donde los salones eran las formas de mostrar los nuevos avances artísticos al gran público. Pero no tratamos de emular a los grandilocuentes Salones del Louvre, ni tan siquiera al Salon des refuiusèes donde hicieran su fortaleza los impresionistas, sino que mas bien miramos a la aventura de un visionario, el que se autoproclamaba Sâr Péladan y que fundó el Salon de la Rose + Croix en el cual participaron fundamentalmente los artistas de la corriente simbolista. Aunque un poco lejos de la excentricidad de Péladan pero siguiendo algunos de los principios que inspiraron su gusto estético, presentamos este Salón Neo-Simbolista, mas de una centuria después.

Las propuestas artísticas para la exposición deberán basarse en la iconografía simbolista pero reinterpretada dentro de los parámetros de la contra-cultura, del contra-Arte, de la oposición al mercado y al establishment. Porque probablemente la verdadera esencia del arte de nuestra época está muy lejos de allí y hay que encontrarlo en el underground.

Se proponen las siguientes temáticas para las obras que conformarán el Salón Neo-Simbolista:

La Belleza Maldita y la Belleza del Exceso
Bellos, Decadentes y Malditos
La Belleza de lo Siniestro
La Bella Dama sin piedad
El Dandy tenebroso
Seres híbridos: Esfinges, Arpías y Lamias
Lo Sagrado Femenino
El Andrógino” [via]

Enchanted Modernities at University of Amsterdam on Sept 25th – 27th, 2013

Enchanted Modernities: Theosophy and the arts in the modern world is a conference that will take place on September 25th – 27th, 2013 at the University of Amsterdam and other locations in Amsterdam. The conference is part of the Enchanted Modernities: Theosophy, Modernism and the Arts, c. 1875-1960 project by the Department of History of Art at the University of York, UK.

enchanted-modernities-conference-amsterdam-2013

“This is the first conference of the newly established research network, Enchanted Modernities: Theosophy, modernism and the Arts c. 1875-1960, funded by the Leverhulme Trust. The conference will be organized in collaboration with the Centre for the History of Hermetic philosophy and related currents, University of Amsterdam.

Building on a very successful exploratory colloquium at Liverpool Hope University in December 2010, this conference will explore what the arts can tell us about the complex relationships between Theosophy, modernity and artistic culture, c. 1875-1960. The purpose of this conference is to bring together an international group of scholars working on Theosophy and the arts across the globe in this period, and as a result, map the rich variety of artistic responses to the influence of Theosophy and the Theosophical movements in the modern world. The connections between Theosophy and modernist aesthetics have been well documented in relation to certain artists such as Kandinsky and Mondrian, as well as composers like Scriabin and Rudhyar. However, the purpose of this conference is to develop a more nuanced and complex picture of the multiple layering of art, modernity and mysticism in a range of artistic practices in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The wider critical significance of the relationships between painting, sculpture, applied and decorative arts, music, architecture on the one hand and Theosophy on the other, with the exception of a few well known case-studies, is still largely to be explored, possibly because, as the historian Alex Owen has suggested, ‘the very notion of mysticism and the occult seem to run counter to our conception of modern culture and the modern mind set’.” [via]

Manifest Thy Glory

Manifest Thy Glory: Proceedings of the Eighth Biennial National Ordo Templi Orientis Conference was recently released, and may be of interest. This book includes the text of presentations by many Hermetic Library fellows, including Sabazius, T Polyphilus, Colin Campbell, and Beth Kimbell, and touches many topics related to the subject matter of the library.

National Ordo Templi Orientis Conference NOTOCON Manifest Thy Glory

Manifest Thy Glory offers a selection of papers from the eighth biennial National Ordo Templi Orientis Conference (NOTOCON) of the United States Grand Lodge of O.T.O., held in the Valley of Detroit, Michigan, in 2011 EV. The papers cover diverse topics including the Holy Guardian Angel, talismans in magick, spatial orientation in ritual, and other magical methods; occult history and biography, including the Stèle of Revealing and Ida Craddock; promulgation of Thelema through publishing and podcasts; textual analysis from Catullus to ‘Liber Trigrammaton;’ a touching reminiscence from the incomparable Lon Milo DuQuette; and even space, the final frontier. Other highlights include a street guide to Thelemic historical sites in Detroit, and the address given by U.S. National Grand Master Sabazius. They represent some of best modern practical and scholarly work on Ordo Templi Orientis, Thelema, and the magick of Aleister Crowley.

The first NOTOCON conference took place in 1997 EV in Akron, Ohio, and has since been held on alternate years in different cities around the United States. Manifest Thy Glory is the third collection of papers from the national conference to be made available, following the inaugural volume Beauty & Strength for the 2007 EV conference.

Ordo Templi Orientis is an international fraternal order of men and women devoted to the pursuit of individual liberty, the study of magick, and the promulgation of the Law of Thelema. Founded in the early twentieth century, it has been shaped by such leading lights as Carl Kellner, Theodor Reuss, Aleister Crowley, Karl Germer and Grady Louis McMurtry.” [via]

The Occult Humanities Conference at NYU on Oct 18-20, 2013

The Occult Humanities Conference: Contemporary Art and Scholarship on the Esoteric Traditions will take place at NYU on Oct 18-20, 2013 in New York. The conference was announced today and looks to be quite worth checking out, especially since information about the schedule, participants and exhibition have already been posted. The event is being hosted by Phantasmaphile, the Observatory, and NYU Steinhardt Department of Art and Art Professions.

The Occult Humanities Conference 2013

 

Pam Grossman announced this on her Phantasmaphile blog today.

I am thrilled to announce The Occult Humanities Conference, taking place on October 18th-20th at NYU, and co-organized by myself and Jesse Bransford. The weekend will feature lectures, an art exhibition, and entertainment, all of which explore occult subject matter.

Speakers include Susan Aberth, Robert Ansell, Elijah Burgher, Laurent Ferri, Mitch Horowitz, Amy Hale, William Kiesel, Gary Lachman, Mark Pilkington, Shannon Taggart, Jesse, and myself.

The accompanying exhibition, Verbal, Somatic and Material, will contain artwork and esoteric books by Jesse Bransford, Elijah Burgher, David Chaim Smith, Fulgur Esoterica, Ouroboros Press, and Shannon Taggart.

Entertainment will be provided by The Parlour Trick and Acep Hale.

And there will be books vended by Catland, Fulgur Esoterica, and Ouroboros Press.” [via]

 

“The Occult Humanities Conference
October 18-20, 2013
Hosted by Phantasmaphile, Observatory and the NYU Steinhardt Department of Art and Art Professions

NYU Steinhardt
34 Stuyvesant St., New York, NY

The Occult Humanities Conference is a weekend conference to be held in New York City on October 18-20th, 2013. The conference will present a wide array of voices active in the cultural landscape who are specifically addressing the occult tradition through research, scholarship and artistic practice.

The arts and humanities at present are acutely interested in subjects related to the occult tradition. The tradition represents a rich and varied visual culture that displays a complex set of relations at once culturally specific and global in their transmission. Roughly defined, the occult tradition represents a series of culturally syncretic belief systems with related and overlapping visual histories. Though there are as many ways into this material as there are cultural — and personal — perspectives, universal occult concerns often include a belief in some sort of magic; a longing to connect with an immaterial or trans-personal realm; and a striving for inner-knowledge, refinement of the self, and transformation of one’s consciousness — if not one’s physical circumstances.

Intensely marginalized throughout most historical periods, these traditions persist and represent an ‘underground’ perspective that periodically exerts a strong influence on structures of dissent, utopianism and social change. Though history is marked with several so-called ‘Occult Revivals,’ the contemporary digital age is a perfect confluence of several factors which make this moment prime for a reexamination of all of the esoteric traditions. While the information age has allowed for easier access to previously obscure writings, imagery, and social contexts, it alternately elicits a deep desire for sensorial experiences and meaning-making once one steps away from the screen.

The presenters at the OHC represent a rich and expanding community of international artists and academics from multiple disciplines across the humanities who share an exuberance and excitement for how the occult traditions interface with their fields of study as well as the culture at large. The small scale of this conference (approximately 100 attendees) will give ticket holders an intimate look at the presenters and their views.

The visually-oriented presentations will be coupled with an exhibition of artworks by several presenters and artisanal books from Fulgur Esoterica and Ouroboros Press.” [via]