Tag Archives: creativity

Archetypal Imagination

Archetypal Imagination: Glimpses of the Gods in Life and Art by Noel Cobb, introduced by Thomas Moore, part of the Studies in Imagination edited in collaboration with the Institute for the Study of Imagination, a 1992 paperback from Lindisfarne Press, is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

Noel Cobb Thomas Moore Archetypal Imagination from Lindisfarne Press

“This unique book is about freeing psychology’s poetic imagination from the dead weight of unconscious assumptions about the soul. Whether we think of the soul scientifically or medically, behaviorally or in terms of inner development, all of us are used to thinking of it in an individual context, as something personal. In this book, however, we are asked to consider psychology from a truly transpersonal perspective as a cultural, universal-human phenomenon.

Reading these essays we are taught to look at the world as the record of the soul’s struggles to awaken, as the soul’s poetry. From this point of view, the true basis of the mind is poetic. Beauty, love, and creativity are as much instincts of the soul as sexuality or hunger. Thus these essays praise the value and nobility of the imagination, and instead of the usual masters of psychology the exemplars here are the artists and mystics of the Western tradition, Dante, Rumi, Rilke, Munch, Lorca, Schumann, Tarkovsky.” — back cover


A Course in Demonic Creativity

A Course in Demonic Creativity: A Writer’s Guide to the Inner Genius by Matt Cardin is available for download again, as a free ebook.

Matt Cardin's A Course in Demonic Creativity

“Where does creativity come from? Why do ideas and inspiration feel as if they come from ‘outside,’ from an external source that’s separate from us but able to whisper directly into the mind? Why have so many writers throughout history — and also composers, painters, philosophers, mystics, and scientists — spoken of being guided, accompanied, and even haunted by a force or presence that not only serves as the deep source of their creative work but that exerts a kind of profound and inexorable gravitational pull on the shape of their lives?

These are all questions addressed by A Course in Demonic Creativity: A Writer’s Guide to the Inner Genius. The book’s starting point is the proposition that we all possess a higher or deeper intelligence than the everyday mind, and that learning to live and work harmoniously and energetically with this intelligence is the irreducible core of a successful artistic life. We can call this inner force the unconscious mind or the silent partner. We can call it the id or the secret self. But muse, daimon, and genius are so much more effective at conveying its subversive and electrifying emotional charge, and also its experiential reality.

Your unconscious mind truly is your genius in the ancient sense of the word, the sense that was universal before it was fatefully altered several centuries ago by historical-cultural forces. Befriending it as such, and interacting with it as if it really is a separate, collaborating presence in your psyche, puts you in a position to receive its gifts, and it in the position to give them to you.” [via]

Spell Casting with Heart & Spirit

Spell Casting with Heart & Spirit is a short comic by Ian Anderson, aka Citric Comics, previously posted on his blog, but available now as a 60 page downloadable PDF, combined with The Best Part another short comic.

Ian Anderson's Spell Casting with Heart & Spirit

“60 Pages of comics between two stories! Spell Casting With Heart & Spirit is about a Witch and a Duck talking about magic and The Best Part is about a little dog looking for rare gems.

Two tales about creativity and making stuff in comics form!”

Ian Anderson's Spell Casting with Heart & Spirit 2

Smith of Wootton Major

Hermetic Library fellow T Polyphilus reviews Smith of Wootton Major by J R R Tolkien:

J R R Tolkien's Smith of Wooton Major

 

This slender novella was one of Tolkein’s last works that he saw published during his lifetime. It is a cross-generational fable about creativity, fortune, and loss. It is very effective when read aloud; I had the pleasure of having it read to me by my Other Reader over the course of three sittings.

Smith is unoriginal in the best possible way for a modern fairy-tale. I was reminded strongly of Dunsany’s The King of Elfland’s Daughter, but some of the episodes in Faery in the middle of the book exhibit the sort of psychedelic reverie that I associate more with the work of George MacDonald. Sure enough, the wikipedia article on Smith of Wootton Major gives Tolkein’s story its origin in an attempt at a preface to MacDonald’s “The Golden Key.” Tracing the line of influence the other direction, I believe that Susanna Clarke must have read this book.

The Pauline Baynes illustrations are lovely, and really capture the spirit of the thing. [via]

 

 

The Hermetic Library Reading Room is an imaginary and speculative future reification of the library in the physical world, a place to experience a cabinet of curiosities offering a confabulation of curation, context and community that engages, archives and encourages a living Western Esoteric Tradition. If you would like to contribute to the Hermetic Library Reading Room, consider supporting the library or contact the librarian.

The Soul’s Code

Hermetic Library fellow T Polyphilus reviews The Soul’s Code: In Search of Character and Calling by James Hillman:

James Hillman's The Soul's Code from Grand Central Publishing

 

Hillman is a Jungian psychologist, and this volume is a secularized treatment of the attainment of daimonic inspiration, written for a popular audience. Most of the book treats its topic through extensive biographical anecdotes, and the conclusion foregrounds a phallic symbolism of creativity and destiny. Recommended to Thelemites. [via]

 

 

The Hermetic Library Reading Room is an imaginary and speculative future reification of the library in the physical world, a place to experience a cabinet of curiosities offering a confabulation of curation, context and community that engages, archives and encourages a living Western Esoteric Tradition. If you would like to contribute to the Hermetic Library Reading Room, consider supporting the library or contact the librarian.

Intùiti Creative Cards

Intùiti Creative Cards is a new kickstarter campaign to create “a deck of cards for Creativity born in the Polytechnic University of Milan. A synthesis of Design, Tarot and Gestalt Psychology,” which may be of interest. [HT Jonathan Korman]

Intuiti creative cards kickstarter

“Intùiti is a deck of cards for Creativity.

It was born as a project of the Polytechnic University of Milan and it represents a new way of living the subject of creativity, an issue that is often superficially tackled. Instead of forcing the user to find an idea, as it happens with some techniques like brainstorming or the mind map, Intùiti invites to sit calmly and to feel what one has to give, remembering that creating must be a source of joy and satisfaction.

Intùiti proposes pointed suggestions, obtained from the analysis of classic tarots, that are a rich collection of archetypes. It has not an esoteric purpose: each card is related to a thinking model that belongs to our culture, a powerful incentive that can put in motion creative and inspirational processes.

Intùiti is a synthesis of Design, Tarots, Numerology and Gestalt Psychology. At the same time it is a serious game and a powerful tool that doesn’t treat the creative act according to rigid schemas, but it brings out its bright side.” [via]