Tag Archives: demons

It is hard, in fact, not to imagine the Angelic Conversations as a kind of Elizabethan sitcom—the records are as much a comedy of errors as they are fearsome divine revelation, with Dee and Kelley gossiping around their scrying board, angels drifting through the room and sternly lecturing them, political intrigues, an annoyed Elizabeth hovering, and walk-on bits from demons and European nobles, all set against the backdrop of the imminent Eschaton.

Jason Louv, The Angelic Reformation: John Dee, Enochian Magick & the Occult Roots of Empire

Hermetic quote Louv Reformation sitcom

Shadow and Evil in Fairy Tales

Shadow and Evil in Fairy Tales by Marie-Louise von Franz, a C G Jung Foundation book, a 1995 revised edition paperback from Shambhala Publications, is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

Marie-Louise von Franz Shadow and Evil in Fairy Tales from Shambhala Publications

“Fairy tales seem to be innocent stories, yet they contain profound lessons for those who would dive deep into their waters of meaning. In this book, Marie-Louise von Franz uncovers some of the important lessons concealed in tales from around the world, drawing on the wealth of her knowledge of folklore, her experience as a psychoanalyst and a collaborator with Jung, and her great personal wisdom. Among the many topics discussed in relation to the dark side of life and human psychology, both individual and collective, are:
· How different aspects of the “shadow”—all the affects and attitudes that are unconscious to the ego personality—are personified in the giants and monsters, ghosts, and demons, evil kings and wicked witches of fairy tales
· How problems of the shadow manifest differently in men and women
· What fairy tales say about the kinds of behavior and attitudes that invite evil
· How Jung’s technique of Active imagination can be used to overcome overwhelming negative emotions
· How ghost stories and superstitions reflect the psychology of grieving
· What fairy tales advise us about whether to struggle against evil or turn the other cheek ” — back cover


LeMulgeton: Goetia and the Stellar Tradition

LeMulgeton: Goetia and the Stellar Tradition by Leo Holmes is a new release available directly from Fall of Man in physical and digital editions. There are also a number of images of the book on their social networking page and a sample chapter on the website.

Leo Holmes' Lemulgeton from Fall of Man

“Most of The Ars Goetia readers, if not all, are much more interested in what they can get or do by using it than in its origins. But how did it arrive to our days? What, or who, are the subjects in the book? Why 72 and what do their classifications mean? What can their depictions say about them? A lot of questions remain, and it is the aim of LeMulgeton: Goetia and the Stellar Tradition to point towards where some of those answers can be found.

Throughout the pages of this work, the author attempts to relate both Lemegeton and Mul.Apin (a Babylonian compendium that deals with many diverse aspects of Babylonian astronomy and astrology), attributing the Goetics to the Sumerian Constellations (which include single stars and planets) neglecting the prose’s linear flow for the sake of mythic astronomical approach. For that, the author analyzes every possibility – similarity in names, coincidental depictions, mythological attributions and even Constellations’ modern names – following the order in which the demons are presented in Lemegeton. These associations are not to be taken dogmatically though, but rather serve as a pragmatic working table to stimulate contemporary magicians to further develop knowledge and practice on these matters. Mul.Apin and Lemegeton are apophenic (and pareidolic) maps whose sole intent is to serve as a medium for keeping alive a knowledge which is probably as old as human nature. Therefore, those associations are temporary, ever revolving, just like the stars they are about.

The aim of LeMulgeton: Goetia and the Stellar Tradition is to attend a call and to re-establish a long lost connection with the Elder Gods.” [via]

72DEMONS Book

Previews of the 72DEMONS book have been posted, which is the end goal of the 72DEMONS Project that started back on 2011 to create new illustrations for all 72 demons from Ars Goetia. It’s been a long time coming, but looks gorgeous and worth the wait!

plate27_sparrow02
RONOVE

“Inspired by the Lesser Key of Solomon, comics, and 17th century grimoire, the 72DEMONS project is a venue for new and budding visual artists. Our goal is to publish an illustrated book depicting the seventy-two demons archived in the Ars Goetia, believed to be a guide written by King Solomon for summoning both helpful and malevolent spirits. Thousands of years later these entities persist, although they have changed their names and faces!

Since summer of 2011, 72DEMONS has expanded into a diverse collective of illustrators, painters, graphic designers, writers and video artists — making for one hefty book! Like what you see? What you are viewing now are only a few pieces from the first full-color proof.” [via]

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STOLAS

Mythologies

Mythologies by William Butler Yeats, the 1969 softcover edition from Collier Books, is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

William Butler Yeats' Mythologies

“Banshees and faeries, demons and curses, village ghosts and mystic poets…

work their Gaelic magic in this enthralling collection of supernatural tales from the pen of William Butler Yeats. Based on Irish country beliefs, traditions, and folk tales, the stories were first published at the height of Yeats’ romantic period in three collections entitled The Celtic Twilight, The Secret Rose, and Stories of Red Hanrahan.

A concluding section of essays reveal Yeats’ own speculations on and experiences of the supernatural and his philosophy of self and not-self. Together with the stories, they offer rich and varied perspectives of Yeats’ genius and eloquent proof that the great poet could work unique enchantment in prose as well as in poetry and drama.”

 

The Hermetic Library Reading Room is an imaginary and speculative future reification of the library in the physical world, a place to experience a cabinet of curiosities offering a confabulation of curation, context and community that engages, archives and encourages a living Western Esoteric Tradition. If you would like to contribute to the Hermetic Library Reading Room, consider supporting the library or contact the librarian.

Sorcerer

Sorcerer: A Novel of Queen Elizabeth’s Alchemist by Geoffrey James, from Grand Mal Press, arrived at the Reading Room courtesy of the author.

Geoffrey James' Sorcerer from Grand Mal Press

 

“Based on actual diaries and historical accounts, Sorcerer: A Novel of Queen Elizabeth’s Alchemist breaks the barrier between fantasy and historical fiction, recreating a long-hidden real-life world of death, sex, politics and ritual magic.

The year is 1584. John Dee, the greatest scholar of his age, has turned from reputable science to forbidden magic. In partnership with a visionary rogue, an ex-nun and a court beauty, he’s flees across Europe, dogged by the Inquisition and a relentless assassin.

Finally, Dee’s magic seems to yield fruit. Angels (or are they demons?) promise to reveal the secret of transmuting lead into gold. There is only one hitch: Dee and his companions must first commit an unforgivable sin.” [via]

 

 

The Hermetic Library Reading Room is an imaginary and speculative future reification of the library in the physical world, a place to experience a cabinet of curiosities offering a confabulation of curation, context and community that engages, archives and encourages a living Western Esoteric Tradition. If you would like to contribute to the Hermetic Library Reading Room, consider supporting the library or contact the librarian.

Make Magic of Your Life

Make Magic of Your Life: Passion, Purpose, and the Power of Desire by Hermetic Library anthology artist T Thorn Coyle [also], from Weiser Books, is available now.

“Do you have the sense that you were born to do something more with your life but you don’t know what that is? Do you long to step into your power and live a life of passion? Do you wish to be of greater service? Are you willing to follow your soul’s desire?

Activate the magical formula known the Four Powers of the Sphinx. These four powers — To Know, To Will, To Dare, and To Keep Silence — help bring about a profound shift in how we view and move through the world. They point us toward our highest purpose and show us what to do, both practically and spiritually, once we’ve found it. They will lead us to a life of magic.

Find your soul’s work. Follow desire. Live a life that matters.” [via]

 

T Thorn Coyle's Make Magic of Your Life from Weiser Books

“For pagans or anyone with magickal leanings everywhere, internationally known pagan and mystic T. Thorn Coyle offers a unique path to make everything in one’s life alive with magic in Make Magic of Your Life.

Coyle shows how to achieve harmony and balance, and find your true purpose by activating the magical Qabalistic formula known as The Four Powers of the Sphinx: to know, to will, to dare, and to keep silent.

Coyle shows readers how to draw on the four powers of the sphinx to discover their “soul’s possibility,” their life’s work, that which they most long to do.

In Make Magic of Your Life, Coyle explains how our deepest failings are often the very things that fuel our life’s work, keep us human and whole, and even make us act as though — like Prometheus — we can steal fire from the Gods.

From the introduction:
“Working magic means showing up with your demons and your divinity, your sorrow and your joy. Alchemy only happens when we are willing to go through the processes of gathering together, refining, pouring, and solidifying. In the end, we have something fine to hold.” [via]

 

“Pathology of the Sublime” from Problems on the Path of Return by Mark Stavish, M.A. in Vol 3 No 1 of Caduceus.

“However, as Ferrucci states, journeys into the Inner Worlds are not without their own dangers, even into the higher ones.

‘Intense spiritual stimulation may bring inspirations, but may also penetrate directly into the lower conscious, where it throws light on and excites demons, instinctual energies, forgotten memories, and so on. These then tend to rise to consciousness, causing all sorts of trouble to the surprised conscious personality. When the demons are thus aroused, the contrast between different sides of our nature is felt with particular intensity.'” [via]

I Make Myself Invisible in Articles by Aleister Crowley.

“According to the rules of magic, I built a terrace with a northern aspect and carted river sand to it.

I worked in the breakfast-room at making the talismans which were necessary to my purpose. The sun was streaming into the room, but in vain; there was a darkness which could be felt. The demons, evil forces, had congregated round me so thickly that they were shutting off the light. It was a comforting situation. There could be no more doubt of the efficiency of the operation.” [via, also]