Tag Archives: doctrines

A New New Testament

A New New Testament: A Bible for the 21st Century Combining Traditional and Newly Discovered Texts by Hal Taussig is a relatively new book, available from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, that caught my eye. It looks like a work intended more for mass consumption and as another easy introduction to the material than a truly innovative and revolutionary redaction and collection, but may still be of some interest.

Hal Taussig's A New New Testament

“It is time for a new New Testament.

Over the past century, numerous lost scriptures have been discovered, authenticated, translated, debated, celebrated. Many of these documents were as important to shaping early-Christian communities and beliefs as what we have come to call the New Testament; these were not the work of shunned sects or rebel apostles, not alternative histories or doctrines, but part of the vibrant conversations that sparked the rise of Christianity. Yet these scriptures are rarely read in contemporary churches; they are discussed nearly only by scholars or within a context only of gnostic gospels. Why should these books be set aside? Why should they continue to be lost to most of us? And don’t we have a great deal to gain by placing them back into contact with the twenty-seven books of the traditional New Testament—by hearing, finally, the full range of voices that formed the early chorus of Christians?

To create this New New Testament, Hal Taussig called together a council of scholars and spiritual leaders to discuss and reconsider which books belong in the New Testament. They talked about these recently found documents, the lessons therein, and how they inform the previously bound books. They voted on which should be added, choosing ten new books to include in A New New Testament. Reading the traditional scriptures alongside these new texts—the Gospel of Luke with the Gospel of Mary, Paul’s letters with The Letter of Peter to Philip, The Revelation to John with The Secret Revelation to John—offers the exciting possibility of understanding both the new and the old better. This new reading, and the accompanying commentary in this volume, promises to reinvigorate a centuries-old conversation and to bring new relevance to a dynamic tradition.” [via]

Jesus Christ, Sun of God

Hermetic Library fellow T Polyphilus reviews Jesus Christ, Sun of God: Ancient Cosmology and Early Christian Symbolism by David Fideler from Quest Books:

David Fideler's Jesus Christ, Sun of God from Quest Books

 

“Ancient Cosmology and Early Christian Symbolism” barely suggests the profound topics addressed in this wonderful book. Besides drawing out many of the continuities between the Pythagorean tradition and the Christian mysteries, Fideler’s text demonstrates the span and depth of the idea of harmony as the metaphysical basis for universal brotherhood.

There is a certain palpable sympathy between the doctrines expressed by Fideler and the elegant and powerful work of Buckminster Fuller, which becomes a matter of direct allusion in the final chapter with Fideler’s appeal to “the Philosophy of Whole Systems.”

A great strength of the book is its host of illustrative diagrams, conveying the logos of the author’s thesis in a more varied and powerful manner than text alone could ever accomplish. Jesus Christ: Sun of God is a master’s piece, showing how its author can apply all seven of the arts and sciences to a single, essential topic, and encouraging any fellow craftsman to follow such a course to “the Invocation of Harmony and the Unification of Culture.”

Anyone interested in the real spiritual value of Christianity (or arithmetic!) can enjoy this book, and will be likely to learn much from it. [via]

 

 

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