Tag Archives: eschaton

It is hard, in fact, not to imagine the Angelic Conversations as a kind of Elizabethan sitcom—the records are as much a comedy of errors as they are fearsome divine revelation, with Dee and Kelley gossiping around their scrying board, angels drifting through the room and sternly lecturing them, political intrigues, an annoyed Elizabeth hovering, and walk-on bits from demons and European nobles, all set against the backdrop of the imminent Eschaton.

Jason Louv, The Angelic Reformation: John Dee, Enochian Magick & the Occult Roots of Empire

Hermetic quote Louv Reformation sitcom

The Neteru of Kemet

The Neteru of Kemet: An Introduction by Tamara Siuda-Legan, from Eschaton, is part of the collection at the Reading Room. There is a newer reprint edition, than the one in the collection, available.

Tamara Siuda-Legan The Neteru of Kemet from Eschaton

“Three thousand years before the birth of Jesus Christ and perhaps even before, a civilization thrived on the banks of the Nile River in northern Africa that was called by its inhabitants Kemet (‘Black Land’). This land is known today by the Greek name Egypt. By virtue of extensive archaeological study, we know a great deal about this ancient culture which in some ways was more advanced than our own; a culture that embraced multiple expressions of Deity, provided fro social equality across race and gender, boasted a government and civil service to rival that of ancient China; and had remarkably practical religious philosophy.”

“Though there were more than 200 different rulers (both male and female), at least three major foreign occupations and many rewriting of ‘official’ history, philosophy and religious dogma, the faith of both the people and the priest(ess)hood of Kemet was highly celebratory and life-affirming. Though different Neteru were worshipped under different rulers and from place to place, They all has something in common: They were accessible to all and to each other, and Their worship covered every facet of life, from conception to death to rebirth and everything in between.”

“This workbook is intended as an adjunct to personal study and meditation on the Neteru, not as a total overview of the Kemetic religion. It is best used by someone who is either already familiar with the history and philosophy of Kemet or who is interested in learning of the Neteru and Their expression.”

“Meditative work with these Neteru can provide a sound introduction to the religion of Kemet, as all of Them are readily accessible to the sincere seeker. (An important note: ‘sincere’ in the Kemetic philosophy does not mean addressing Neter as an archetype or focus point of the Higher Self, known as the ka or ‘double.’ As in other indigenous African religions, Neteru are actual spiritual beings and do not respond favorably to New Age philosophy’s ‘I am God/ess’ arrogance.)” — from the Introduction

The Invisible Kingdom

Hermetic Library fellow T Polyphilus reviews The Invisibles Vol. 7: The Invisible Kingdom by Grant Morrison:

Grant Morrison's The Invisible Kingdom

 

This trade paper volume collects all twelve issues of the third and final Invisibles series. New characters are introduced, and the boundaries between the various conspiracies motivating the action become ever more porous as the eschaton is immanentized.

The closing series of the comic—especially its last issues—suffers from a surfeit of artists. It gets to the point where a single illustrator rarely has contributed more than two or three pages in sequence. In some cases, a shift of artistic style seems to be deliberately communicating a shift of perspective, but these seem to be the minority, and the visual idiolects are so divergent that the reader must struggle to identify characters and settings in panel after panel.

Once in a while, I would pause and try to bring “beginner’s mind” to bear on the dialogue of the book (especially the pronouncements of “expert” protagonists like King Mob and Helga), and I found that it was mostly sesquipedalian gibberish. For better or for worse, though, it’s the sort of gibberish that my conditioned mind understands and enjoys.

These comic books were originally issued in 1999 and 2000, and they are very much a product of their time. No one could or would write this sort of thing today. Even though the essential fears expressed here remain in force, our political context has rather dampened and shifted the corresponding hopes. Another book from the same period that has dated similarly is Hakim Bey’s Millennium. I would contrast Morrsion’s more concentrated and coherent effort in The Filth, which addresses many similar themes. [via]

 

 

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