Tag Archives: esoterica

Hermetic Library Zine November 2016

Announcing the release of Hermetic Library Zine, June 2016, Issue #2, a publication of Hermetic Library.

Hermetic Library Zine November 2016

Each zine is a wild and wooly whatever of occultura and esoterrata compiled together, generally related to Hermetic Library’s overall mission of archiving, engaging and encouraging the living Western Esoteric Tradition, Hermeticism, and Aleister Crowley’s Thelema.

Contents of this issue are:

Jacques de Beaufort, John Eberly — Hyacinth and Myrrh, Lisette Costanzo — Crow, Justin Nelson — Neoplatonism and Plotinus, Arn Gyssels — Progenitive Spears, Aleph Alpha 333 — The Two Towers, Lisette Costanzo — A’ Magara, Aleph Alpha 333 — The Extreme Flexibility of Man and the Powers of the Mind, Arn Gyssels — Andromeda / Pan-Dimensional Communication, Justin Nelson — In Defense of Mystery Religion, Ömer Aksoy — Tipsy Psyche, Aleph Alpha 333 — Buddha, Ben Roylance — I Know You from Somewhere 8/10–8/15 2016

Follow news and announcements for Hermetic Library Zine on the library blog, and get in touch with the Librarian to submit your content for the next issue!

I would especially like to take a moment to thank each and every 2016 Funding Campaign and Patron Campaign supporter for helping to make this new zine and the work of the library possible.

Hermetic Library Zine June 2016

Introducing Hermetic Library Zine, June 2016, Issue #1, a publication of Hermetic Library.

Hermetic Library Zine June 2016

Each zine is a wild and wooly whatever of occultura and esoterrata compiled together, generally related to Hermetic Library’s overall mission of archiving, engaging and encouraging the living Western Esoteric Tradition, Hermeticism, and Aleister Crowley’s Thelema.

Contents of this issue are:

Lisette Costanzo — Snake, Brian Redfern, Frater Osiris — Alternate Path to Pé, Juliana Paniagua, John Griogair Bell — Demons, Samuel Henly, Craig Conley —The Five Norths of the Left-Hand Path, Ryan Michael Pfeiffer — Delineatas Magicae Mysticum Cacas, Ömer Aksoy — Inside Heliocentric Astrology, Ömer Aksoy — The Heliocentric Perspective, Anonymous, Justin Nelson — Commentary on the Corpus Hermeticum, Lisette Costanzo — Gaia

Follow news and announcements for Hermetic Library Zine on the library blog, and get in touch with the Librarian to submit your content for the next issue!

I would especially like to take a moment to thank each and every 2016 Funding Campaign and Patron Campaign supporter for helping to make this new zine and the work of the library possible.

Nomad Codes

Hermetic Library fellow T Polyphilus reviews Nomad Codes: Adventures in Modern Esoterica by Erik Davis:

Erik Davis' Nomad Codes

 

Erik Davs’ Nomad Codes is a beefy collection of mostly-short articles and essays written during the decades on either side of Y2K, in contemplation of music, drugs, literature, magick, and all manner of cultural weirdness. For the most part, these are biographical studies of creative figures and popular anthropology of countercultures, but there are a couple of movie reviews, and other less identifiable literary forms.

I was pleased to see Davis employ the category of ludibrium in his “Shards of the Diamond Matrix,” but the result wasn’t nearly as compelling to me as the personal anecdotes that surface in various various travelogue passages, in the prefatory “Teenage Head” memoirette, and the two brief essays “Diamond Solitaire” and “Remote Control.” These latter pieces seem to be signposts for the two (complementary?) spiritual conditions that Davis is most concerned to indicate: mystical engagement and paranoid alienation. Unlike his ludibrium, the more theoretical piece on “Tantric Psychedelia” uses tantra to refer to the Asian religious tradition, not the popularized sex mysticism of neo-tantra.

With dozens of pieces broken out into five sloppily thematic sections, there’s quite a bit of variety here. Davis approaches his material intelligently, but he doesn’t condescend to his subjects or his readers, and the book is a pleasure to read. I seem to share his interests sufficiently that, in many cases, his exposition didn’t show me anything new, but I enjoyed it anyway. And there were certainly a few ideas and people I was grateful to encounter for the first time. [via]

 

 

The Hermetic Library Reading Room is an imaginary and speculative future reification of the library in the physical world, a place to experience a cabinet of curiosities offering a confabulation of curation, context and community that engages, archives and encourages a living Western Esoteric Tradition. If you would like to contribute to the Hermetic Library Reading Room, consider supporting the library or contact the librarian.

The Forbidden Book got mentioned over on Boing Boing

The Forbidden Book, a new English language release of a work by Hermetic Library fellow Joscelyn Godwin and Guido Mina di Sospiro, got mentioned over on Boing Boing at “Five novels and their occult inspirations” along with a few others recommended by di Sospiro and Godwin. I mentioned new edition of The Forbidden Book back in April but it’s great to see this kind of coverage for esoteric fiction and fictional esoterica.

“Guido Mina di Sospiro and Joscelyn Godwin, authors of The Forbidden Book, wrote about five novels and their occult inspirations for Boing Boing:

How do you find works of occult fiction that are not just fantasies? We have just published one of them: The Forbidden Book, released as an e-book by The Disinformation Company. It is a murder mystery, a romance, a political conundrum, but above all an account of magick in action. We think of it as belonging to a rare strain of fiction by authors who actually know occult traditions and the philosophies behind them. That way the reader is not just playing “let’s pretend” but learning some insights into reality that are potentially life-changing.”

[via]