Tag Archives: father

Rationalism swept through Germany, more especially the illusion that man’s faculty could establish and secure a single, true, and salvation-guaranteeing religion. This rationalism expressed itself in pamphlets, in systems, in conversations, in secret societies and in many other institutions. It was not satisfied—indeed it did not even bother—to deny the distinctive doctrines of the Catholic church; its basis was rather the simple assertion: nothing in positive Christianity is acceptable except its “reasonable morality,” the doctrine that God is the father of all things, and the proposition that man’s soul is immortal; what goes beyond these three assertions is either poetry or superstition or pure nonsense.

Terry Melanson, Perfectibilists: The 18th Century Bavarian Order of the Illuminati [Amazon, Bookshop, Publisher, Local Library]

Hermetic quote Melanson Perfectibilists rationalism pamphlets conversations secret societies institutions nothing acceptable except reasonable morality beyond is poetry superstition nonsense

The smell pierced her. It coiled and drifted and wove through her, conjuring the last drip of whiskey in her father’s crystal decanter, the first strawberries of summer, the last scrap of Christmas pudding smeared over gold-chased bone china and licked off with lazy tongue swipes. It smelled like a sticky wetness on her fingers, coaxed out of a pretty girl in the cloak room at a Mayfair ball, slipped into a pair of silk gloves and placed on a young colonel’s scarlet shoulder during the waltz.

Kelly Robson, A Human Stain [Amazon, Publisher, Local Library]

Hermetic quote Robson A Human Stain smell pierced her coiled drifted wove conjuring whiskey sticky wetness

It’s an old thing, made of parchment and leather. Some herbalist on my mother’s side of the family started it ages ago. The book’s composed of page after page of ink drawings of plants with descriptions of their medical uses. My father added a section on edible plants that was my guidebook to keeping us alive after his death. For a long time, I’ve wanted to record my own knowledge in it. Things I learned from experience or from Gale, and then the information I picked up when I was training for the Games.

Suzanne Collins, Catching Fire [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher]

Hermetic quote collins catching fire parchment leather ink knowledge

John’s Gospel and Intimations of Apocalyptic

John’s Gospel and Intimations of Apocalyptic, edited by Catrin H Williams and Christopher C Rowland, from Bloomsbury Academic, may be of interest.

Catron H Williams Christopher C Rowland John's Gospel and Intimations of Apocalyptic from Bloomsbury Academic

I heard of this from April D DeConick’s post at Forbidden Gospels:

“I dealt with centuries of mistranslations of John 8:44 and argue in my contribution to this book that this text reveals a long-kept secret that the early Johannine community believed that the devil had a Father who is the Jewish biblical god. This god is not Jesus’ Father. ‘Why are the Heavens Closed? The Johannine Revelation of the Father in the Catholic-Gnostic Debate.’ I also examine 1 John and show that this letter is written to domesticate the early community’s original understanding of John 8:44. This understanding of the Gospel of John forms now the basis of my understanding of Johannine Christianity, and will resurface in my chapter on the fourth gospel (John and the Dark Cosmos) in my book The Ancient New Age.

If you are interested in the Gospel of John and its intersection with revelation, this volume contains some really ‘new’ ideas and I highly recommend it.

Authors and Table of Contents:

· Christopher Rowland and Catrin Williams, Introduction
· John Ashton, Intimations of Apocalyptic: Looking Back and Looking Forward
· Benjamin Reynolds, John and the Jewish Apocalypses: Rethinking the Genre of John’s Gospel
· Ian Boxall, From the Apocalypse of John to the Johannine “Apocalypse in Reverse”: Intimations of Apocalyptic and the Quest for a Relationship
· Jörg Frey, God’s Dwelling on Earth: ‘Shekhina-Theology’ in Revelation 21 and in the Gospel of John
· Catrin Williams, Unveiling Revelation: The Spirit-Paraclete and Apocalyptic Disclosure in the Gospel of John
· Christopher Rowland, ‘Intimations of Apocalyptic’: The Perspective of the History of Interpretation
· April DeConick, Why are the Heavens Closed? The Johannine Revelation of the Father
· Jutta Leonhardt-Balzer, The Ruler of the World, Antichrists and Pseudo-Prophets: Johannine Variations on an Apocalyptic Motif
· Loren Stuckenbruck, Evil in Johannine and Apocalyptic Perspective: Petition for Protection in John 17
· Judith Lieu, Text and Authority in John and Apocalyptic
· Robert G. Hall, The Reader as Apocalyptist in the Gospel of John
· Robin Griffith-Jones, Apocalyptic Mystagogy: Rebirth-from-above in the Reception of John’s Gospel
· Adela Yarbro Collins, Epilogue” [via]

In Nomine Babalon, XLVIII

XLVIII

Now let the woman be girt with a sword,

She bows down to no man, submits to no lord!

Her strength is her armor, her father the sun,

I raise up the cup and adore Babalon!

In Nomine Babalon: 156 Adorations to the Scarlet Goddess

 

The Hermetic Library arts and letters pool is a project to publish poetry, prose and art that is inspired by or manifests the Western Esoteric Tradition. If you would like to submit your work for consideration as part of the Arts and Letters pool, contact the librarian.

Pax Hominibus Bonae Voluntatis by Aleister Crowley in International, Dec 1917.

“These words, ‘Peace to men of good will,’ have been mistranslated, ‘Good will towards men.’ Christ said that he did not come to bring peace, but a sword; that he would divide mother from son and father from daughter, careless of the effect of such remarks upon the feelings of Dr. Sigmund Freud.” [via]

What’s Wrong with the Movies? by Aleister Crowley in Vanity Fair, Jul 1917.

“It has often been said that the worst author knows his business better than the best critic, just as the feeblest father will beget more children than the biggest naval gun. But in the movies we have men who are such atrociously bad critics that they permit the most choking solecisms in almost every scene.” [via]

All Night in White Stains by Aleister Crowley.

“Yea, king and queen of Sheol, terrible
Above all fiends and furies, hating more
The high Jehovah, loving Baal Peor,
Our father and our lover and our god!
Yea, though he lift his adamantine rod
And pierce us through, how shall his anger tame
Fire that glows fiercer for the brand of shame
Thrust in it; so, we who are all of fire,
One dull red flare of devilish desire,
The God of Israel shall not quench with tears,
Nor blood of martyrs drawn from myriad spheres,
Nor watery blood of Christ; that blood shall boil
With all the fury of our hellish toil;
His veins shall dry with heat; his bones shall bleach
Cold and detested, picked of dogs, on each
Dry separate dunghill of burnt Golgotha.” [via]