Tag Archives: form

Dionysos: My eyes were wide open. He teaches the mysteries personally. Pentheus: What form do these mysteries take? Dionysos: That’s a secret. Not for the uninitiated. Pentheus: And for the initiated, do they do some good? Dionysos: You cannot know that. But it is worth knowing.

Anne Carson and Euripides, Bakkhai [Amazon, Bookshop, Publisher, Local Library]

Hermetic quote Carson Euripides Bakkhai eyes wide open teaches mysteries personally form secret uninitiated do some good cannot know worth knowing

To become wise, they would have to learn the true meaning of their own doctrines, symbols, and books, of which they at present merely know the outward form and the dead letter. They would have to form a much higher and nobler conception of God than to invest Him with the attributes of semi-animal man.

Franz Hartmann, With The Adepts [Amazon, Bookshop, Publisher, Hermetic Library]

Hermetic quote Hartmann With the Adepts become wise learn true meaning

An unhealthy life of thought and feeling will not fail to obstruct the path to higher knowledge. Clear, calm thinking, with stability of feeling and emotion, form here the basis of all work. Nothing should be further removed from the student than an inclination toward a fantastical, excitable life, toward nervousness, exaggeration, and fanaticism.

Rudolf Steiner, How to Know Higher Worlds [Bookshop, Amazon, Publisher]

Hermetic quote Steiner Higher Worlds clear calm thinking stability feeling emotion basis of all work

… For Mercy has a human heart, Pity a human face, And Love, the human form divine, And Peace, the human dress.

William Blake, Songs of Innocence, quoted in Thomas Harris, Red Dragon

Hermetic quote Harris Blake Innocence Dragon mercy pity love peace

Homage to Pythagoras

Homage to Pythagoras: Rediscovering Sacred Science, edited by Christopher Bamford, with essays by Christopher Bamford, Keith Critchlow, Robert Lawlor, Anne Macauly, Kathleen Raine, and Arthur G Zajonc, a 1994 paperback from Lindisfarne Press, is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

Christopher Bamford Homage to Pythagoras from Lindisfarne Press

“These articles, both scholarly and sympathetic to the Pythagorean perspective, are proof of the contemporary interest in Pythagoras’ philosophy as a living reality. Homage to Pythagoras is a major addition to the field of Pythagorean studies and traditional mathematics.

Here is a collection of essential documents by people at the leading edge of the sacred sciences in our time.” [via]

Essays include:
· Christopher Bamford, Introduction: Homage to Pythagoras
· Robert Lawlor, Ancient Temple Architecture
· Keith Critchlow, The Platonic Tradition on the Nature of Proportion
· Keith Critchlow, What is Sacred in Architecture?
· Keith Critchlow, Twelve Criteria for Sacred Architecture
· Robert Lawlor, Pythagorean Number as Form, Color, and Light
· Arthur Zajonc, The Two Lights
· Anne Macauley, Apollo: The Pythagorean Definition of God
· Kathleen Raine, Blake, Yeats and Pythagoras


Egyptian Magic in Egyptian Magic by Florence Farr.

“The Osiris Man is established, as in the symbols in which the Osiris is represented by the TAT or Symbol of Stability. Then, and then only, is the question of Sacrifice for others to be considered. And the Osiris may plunge once again into matter; once again making use of his mummied form to seek and to save that which was lost.” [via]

Egyptian Magic in Egyptian Magic by Florence Farr.

“This was the highest work of magic, the Spiritual Alchemy or the Transmutation from human Force to Divine Potency. As is said by the great Iamblichus, in section iv., chapter ii., of The Mysteries:

‘The Priest who invokes is a man; but when he commands powers it is because through arcane symbols, he, in a certain respect, is invested with the sacred Form of the Gods.'” [via]

The Deeper Symbolism of Freemasonry from The Meaning of Masonry by Walter Leslie Wilmshurst.

“And mark that of those jewels some are said to be moveable and transferable, because when displayed in our own lives and natures their influence becomes transferred and communicated to others and helps to uplift and sweeten the lives of our fellows; whilst some are immoveable because they are permanently fixed and planted in the roots of our own being, and are indeed the raw material which has been entrusted to us to work out of chaos and roughness into due and true form.” [via]