Tag Archives: genesis p orridge

Modern Pagans

Modern Pagans: An Investigation of Contemporary Pagan Practices, edited by V Vale, inteviews by V Vale and John Sulak, from Re/Search, is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

V Vale John Sulak Modern Pagans from Re/Search

“A multi-faceted view of Modern Paganism as it is practiced today. Represented are Reclaiming, Gardnerian, Druids, Santeria, Shamans, Goddess historians, Technopagans, activist Pagans, Radical Faeries, Military Paganism, ex-Catholic Pagans, Spiral Dance, EarthSpirit, Pagan piercers, Pagan child-raising, second- and third-generation Pagans, sacred sex, artists, musicians, origes and more! The ‘spiritual’ sequel to Modern Primitives” — back cover

“Featuring:
Starhawk
Margot Adler
Genesis P-Orridge
The Pagan Federation
Patricia Monaghan
Diane di Prima
U.K. Druids
Gardnerians
Technopagans
EarthSpirit
Isaac Bonewits
Plus More!” — front cover

Love Sex Fear Death

Hermetic Library fellow T Polyphilus reviews Love, Sex, Fear, Death: The Inside Story of The Process Church of the Final Judgment by Timothy Wyllie, edited by Adam Parfrey, from Feral House.

Timothy Wyllie Adam Parfrey Love Sex Fear Death from Feral House

I had previously read W.S. Bainbridge’s study of the Process Church, titled Satan’s Power, in my quest for information on this fascinating cult with roots in Scientology, Christian apocalypticism, and Western occultism. While Bainbridge’s book was helpful, and probably the best account in print at that time, the Feral House multiple memoir and archival anthology Love Sex Fear Death totally puts it in the shade by furnishing insider dope from a variety of personal perspectives, along with organizational literature, glossy color propaganda reproductions, and photos of key players.

The words of the title, while seeming to offer two independent clauses in the imperative mood, were titles of four themed issues of The Process magazine, which have their cover art and various contents reproduced in the second part of this book. Roughly the first half of the volume is the Processean memoir of Timothy Wyllie, onetime designer and editor of The Process, an early and enduring member who was part of the group’s inner circle, but who—according to his own account—always occupied a marginal position relative to the group’s social core and theological identities. Following Wyllie’s piece are an assortment of shorter reflections and reports from former Processeans. Between these and the archival reprints, there is an essay by Genesis P-Orridge regarding the Process Church influence on TOPY, and the ways in which TOPY history reflected its predecessor.

Reading these stories certainly de-glamorized the Process for me to a considerable degree, I had less sympathy for their internal practices and mores than brief previous exposures had led me to think I would. The Process Church of the Final Judgment is a sort of “kissing cousin” to Thelema, as demonstrated by their harmonization in TOPY, and by the fact that the first chartered master of an O.T.O. camp of my acquaintance was a former Processean with very fond memories of his time in the Process. They paid their wry respects to the Beast in various events and publications, and their psychological theories were keyed to the work of Adler, whom Crowley noted as the best of the psychoanalytic pioneers of his own period. The Process was also a notable feature of the Chicago counterculture, having had a conspicuous presence in this area from their first efforts to spread in the US (circa 1970) until the eventual quiet implosion of their successor group the Foundation in 1976.

Still, the old Process literature continues to impress with its bravura. The archival materials here also include sheet music for some charming Processean liturgical tunes, like “Christ and Satan Joined in Unity.” The varied memoirs, while sometimes pointing up the shortcomings of the organization and its leaders, still show the nobility of the aspirations among the membership, and their ability to benefit from radical social experimentation. This is an excellent collection for anyone interested in new religious movements generally, and the countercultural moment of the 1960s and 70s particularly. [via]

Thee Psychick Bible

THEE PSYCHICK BIBLE: Thee Apocryphal Scriptures ov Genesis Breyer P-Orridge and Thee Third Mind ov Thee Temple ov Psychick Youth, the 2010 paperback from Feral House, is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

Genesis Breyer P-Orridge Thee Psychick Bible from Feral House

“Thee Temple ov Psychick Youth (TOPY) will be remembered for its crucial influence on youth culture throughout the ’80s and ’90s, popularizing occult investigations, tattooing, body piercing, acid house raves, and other ahead-of-the-curve cultic flirtations and investigations. Its leader was Genesis P-Orridge, co-founder of Psychick TV and Throbbing Gristle, the band that created the industrial music genre.

Thee Psychick Bible is an extraordinary collection of ‘occulture’ texts and images from the TOPY period and today. We have to agree with Genesis when he said that this book may be ‘the most profund new manual on practical magick—taking from its Crowleyan level of liberation and empowermeant of the individual to a next level of realization that magick must then give back to its environment, its community…'”

 

The Hermetic Library Reading Room is an imaginary and speculative future reification of the library in the physical world, a place to experience a cabinet of curiosities offering a confabulation of curation, context and community that engages, archives and encourages a living Western Esoteric Tradition. If you would like to contribute to the Hermetic Library Reading Room, consider supporting the library or contact the librarian.

Portable Darkness

Portable Darkness: An Aleister Crowley Reader is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

Aleister Crowley's Portable Darkness by Scott Michaelsen from Harmony Books

This is the 1989 first edition hardcover which still retains material removed from later editions, including De Arte Magica Liber CDXIV (Book 414). This book was edited by Scott Michaelsen and has forewords by Robert Anton Wilson and Genesis P-Orridge.

 

 

The Hermetic Library Reading Room is an imaginary and speculative future reification of the library in the physical world, a place to experience a cabinet of curiosities offering a confabulation of curation, context and community that engages, archives and encourages a living Western Esoteric Tradition. If you would like to contribute to the Hermetic Library Reading Room, consider supporting the library or contact the librarian.

Nude Supper

 

Nude Supper” by COUM Transmissions from The Sound of Porridge Bubbling

 

“COUM Transmissions were a music and performance art collective who operated in the United Kingdom from 1969 through to 1976. Influenced by the Dada artistic movement, COUM were openly confrontational and subversive, challenging aspects of conventional British society. Founded in Hull, Yorkshire by Genesis P-Orridge, other prominent members included Cosey Fanni Tutti, Peter ‘Sleazy’ Christopherson and Chris Carter, who together went on to found the pioneering industrial band Throbbing Gristle in 1976.

It had a rotating membership, not atypical of the 1960s, and included both intellectual and criminal elements and existed formally from 1969 until 1976. In that year, they exhibited at London’s Institute of Contemporary Arts in a show called Prostitution, which consisted of explicit photographs of lesbians, assemblages of rusty knives, syringes, bloodied hair, used sanitary towels, press clippings and photo documentation of COUM performances in Milan and Paris. There was a lot of outrage expressed by London newspapers and UK politicians, including Tory MP Nicholas Fairbairn, who referred to COUM as the ‘wreckers of Western civilization’. However, memberships to the ICA increased sharply as a result of the COUM show.” [via]

 

 

Robert Anton Wilson & Genesis P Orridge on Infinity Factory

 

Robert Anton Wilson & Genesis P Orridge on Infinity Factory interviewed by Richard Metzger

 

“When they say they won’t negotiate with terrorists, that means rich people won’t negotiate with poor people.”

 

“And that will happen in this country too. They’ll have to negotiate with the poor people eventually. Although this will be the last country in the world, probably.”

 

“There’s going to be a response. I don’t want to say revolution, because I don’t know what form it will take. But, there will be a response.”