Tag Archives: grimoires

Conjuring Spirits

Conjuring Spirits: A manual of Goetic and Enochian Sorcery by Hermetic Library fellow Michael Osiris Snuffin, the 2010 hardcover from Concrescent Press, is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

Michael Osiris Snuffin Conjuring Spirits from Concrescent Press

“Sorcery, defined here as the art of conjuring spirits, is one of the traditional, core disciplines of magickal practice. It is highly admired and its practitioners accorded great prestige. While many of the old grimoires have baroque and elaborate procedures for conjuring spirits, Frater Osiris cuts through the Gordian knot of complexity and obfuscation to present us with a much more direct approach to evoking Goetic and Enochian spirits. It is simple, clear, practical and without mystification. It is highly accessible and designed to enable practitioners to assemble the few tools required, prepare themselves, and begin work almost immediately reaping the practical and spiritual benefits of sorcerous practice. Naturally, it is an approach that some won’t like, but many more will appropriate and tune to their own satisfaction. Anyone can get started here.” [via]

 

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LeMulgeton: Goetia and the Stellar Tradition

LeMulgeton: Goetia and the Stellar Tradition by Leo Holmes is a new release available directly from Fall of Man in physical and digital editions. There are also a number of images of the book on their social networking page and a sample chapter on the website.

Leo Holmes' Lemulgeton from Fall of Man

“Most of The Ars Goetia readers, if not all, are much more interested in what they can get or do by using it than in its origins. But how did it arrive to our days? What, or who, are the subjects in the book? Why 72 and what do their classifications mean? What can their depictions say about them? A lot of questions remain, and it is the aim of LeMulgeton: Goetia and the Stellar Tradition to point towards where some of those answers can be found.

Throughout the pages of this work, the author attempts to relate both Lemegeton and Mul.Apin (a Babylonian compendium that deals with many diverse aspects of Babylonian astronomy and astrology), attributing the Goetics to the Sumerian Constellations (which include single stars and planets) neglecting the prose’s linear flow for the sake of mythic astronomical approach. For that, the author analyzes every possibility – similarity in names, coincidental depictions, mythological attributions and even Constellations’ modern names – following the order in which the demons are presented in Lemegeton. These associations are not to be taken dogmatically though, but rather serve as a pragmatic working table to stimulate contemporary magicians to further develop knowledge and practice on these matters. Mul.Apin and Lemegeton are apophenic (and pareidolic) maps whose sole intent is to serve as a medium for keeping alive a knowledge which is probably as old as human nature. Therefore, those associations are temporary, ever revolving, just like the stars they are about.

The aim of LeMulgeton: Goetia and the Stellar Tradition is to attend a call and to re-establish a long lost connection with the Elder Gods.” [via]

Zoroaster’s Telescope

Zoroaster’s Telescope, or, The Key to the great divinatory Kabbala of the Magi, originally written in 1796 by André-Robert Andrea de Nerciat, available from Ouroboros Press in its first English translation by Jennifer Zahrt.

André-Robert Andrea de Nerciat and Jennifer Zarht's Zoroaster's Telescope from Ouroboros Press

“The Zoroaster’s Telescope claims to be The Key to the Great Divinatory Kabbala of the Magi, and indeed within the text we find an eclectic mix of Angel Magic, Astrology, Divination, twenty-eight Mansions of the Moon, Kabbala, Zoroastrianism, Sacred Geometry, Numerology, reminiscent of the syncretism MacGregor Mathers employed in the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn at the close of the 19th century. As a system of divination, Zoroaster’s Telescope is unique in the genre employing diverse magical methods layout very much along the lines of the grimoires of occult tradition. The book features several wood engraved plates, charts and tables and a large folding plate THE URN wherein the sigla of this art are exemplified. Typographical treatment and design for Zoroaster’s Telescope was executed by Joseph Uccello and the translation was rendered by Dr. Jennifer Zahrt, PhD.” [via]

The Complete Grimoire of Pope Honorius

The Complete Grimoire of Pope Honorius by David Rankine and Paul Harry Barron, from Avalonia Books, is available now for pre-order from the publisher.

This volume is a new “partial translation of Wellcome MS 4666, with numerous additions translated from the French editions of the Grimoire of Pope Honorius dated 1670, 1760 & 1800, and a new translation of the German edition of 1845” with an introduction and commentary.

The Grimoire of Pope Honorius is the first and most important of the French ‘black magic‘ grimoires which proliferated across Europe in the 17th-19th centuries. Combining a grimoire of conjurations to demons of the four directions and seven days of the week with a Book of Secrets full of simple charms, the Grimoire of Pope Honorius was second only to the Key of Solomon in the influence it exerted on magicians, charmers and cunning-folk in both rural and urban France. This grimoire also played a role in social events which rocked France, being used in the Affair of the Poisons which scandalised the French royal court in 1679, and by the young priest who assassinated the archbishop of Paris in 1857.

The Complete Grimoire of Pope Honorius contains material translated from all four of the different French editions of the Grimoire of Pope Honorius, including the complete text of one manuscript version never before seen in English (Wellcome 4666), and a new translation of the later corrupted German version of 1845. All of the material and its variations found in the five different editions of the Grimoire of Pope Honorius is contained in this work, presenting the entire corpus of this grimoire in print for the first time. In addition to tracing much of the material to sources such as the Heptameron, the works of Agrippa and earlier religious texts for the first time, the derivation of much of the material into later grimoires including the Grimorium Verum, the Grand Grimoire/Red Dragon and the Black Dragon is clearly demonstrated.

As well as charms for health, wealth, sex and protection, the Grimoire of Pope Honorius also contains a substantial number of agrarian charms by the Norman magician Guidon for protecting livestock, emphasising the popular rural use of such charms until at least the 19th century. The corpus of charms comes from diverse sources, including Scot’s Discoverie of Witchcraft (1584), and some like the Letter of St Anthony can be dated back to at least the 13th century.

Including numerous illustrations, and tables tracing the derivation of the material through the different editions and into other grimoires, the Complete Grimoire of Pope Honorius demonstrates the versatility and significance of this grimoire, cutting past outdated misperceptions to a viewpoint which reflects more accurately the position of the Grimoire of Pope Honorius in the development of magic since the seventeenth century.” [via]

That Old Black Magick Books, Magazines, and Curiosities

You may be interested in Weiser Antiquarian Book Catalogue #109: That Old Black Magick Books, Magazines, and Curiosities.

Weiser Antiquarian Catalogue 109 - That Old Black Magick Books, Magazines, and Curiosities

“Welcome to the one hundred-and-ninth of our on-line catalogues, this being devoted to books and magazines with a focus on Black Magick.

Fear not if the black arts are not to your taste, we are already working on another of our “Miscellany Lists” and are also making a concerted effort to add fresh titles to our website on a weekly basis. So don’t forget to click the “new arrivals” link at the left side of our homepage regularly.

Amongst the more unusual offerings in the catalogue are a copy of Le Triple Vocabulaire Infernal (ca 1840) by “Frinellan”, an occult anthology published (and quite possibly compiled) by Simon Blocquel, publisher of grimoires, and said to be the source from which Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin acquired the famous “Zoso” symbol. Other rarities include a truly fine copy of the leather-bound First Edition of the “Simon” Necronomicon (1977: limited to 666 copies), and an unusually good copy of the First Edition of Arthur Edward Waite’s The Book of Black Magic and of Pacts (Privately Printed, 1898: 500 copies), one of the first books on the subject to have been studied by Aleister Crowley, and instrumental in his joining the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn. Also listed — and also rare — is a copy of Waite’s reworking of The Book of Black Magic and of Pacts, entitled by him The Secret Tradition in Goetia (1911). Recent limited editions include two works published by Trident Books: The Treasure of the Old Man of the Pyramids (2002: Limited to 300 copies) and Demonographia (1999: limited to 1000 copies) as well as two titles by the Society of Esoteric Endeavour: Praxis Magica Faustiana (2011: limited to 180 copies);and Magic Secrets (2011: limited to 180 copies). Not books, but certainly unusual, are two decorative curiosities: a small vintage hand-painted miniature Toby Jug in the shape of a Demon or Satyr’s Head and an extremely unusual Japanese Mixed Metal Okimono (“Decorative Object”) of a Human Skull with Serpent entwined around it. Also uncommon are a number of British and Australian magazines and newspapers with often rather sensational — and sensationally illustrated — articles on the likes of Anton Szandor LaVey, Alex and Maxine Saunders, and Charles Manson, as well as more broadly on Witchcraft, Satanism and Magic. Similarly sensational, at least with regard to their cover art, are a number of pulp paperbacks from the late 1950s and early 1960s, whose artists seemed to be vying to outdo one another in their gruesomeness. ” [via]