Tag Archives: Hadean Press

The Book of St Cyprian

The Book of St. Cyprian: The Sorcerer’s Treasure, translated with commentary by José Leitão, from Hadean Press, may be of interest. There are a number of recent reviews you may want to check out as well.

Jose Leitao The Book of St Cyprian from Hadean Press

“A translation with extensive commentary of the Livraria Económica edition of O Grande livro de S.Cypriano ou thesouro do feiticeiro, present in the Portuguese National Library in Lisbon — a book so dangerous it needs to be kept in chains.

522 pages, available in both hardback and paperback editions.”

“An extensively commented translation of one of the most complete Portuguese grimoires attributed to St Cyprian of Antioch. A labyrinthic unveiling and re-veiling throughout the history of Western Iberian Bruxaria and Feitiçaria, Catholicism, the blood war of Old and New Christians, the slave trade and the Empire.

In this work, The Book of Saint Cyprian is revealed as a manifestation of vaster and pre-existent magical and folkloric traditions and is inserted into its proper cultural background, providing the reader with the keys to its unwritten content including the Book’s connection to the vast mythical corpus of the Mouras Encantadas.

An essential read for all those interested in folk magic, be it diabolical or saintly, fey traditions, the largely unknown West Iberian magical current and its various traces and manifestations in the modern Ibero-African-American cults of Brazil.

To read this book is a sin, but who reads it will rise to the clouds without wings…

Author and translator José Leitão has done the English-speaking world a great favour by not only translating the grimoire, but also by placing it in its proper context, in this way increasing its usefulness for the modern practitioner by treating it as a magical text as well as providing clues for its usage along with an analysis of its folkloric elements. Writing in a style that will educate, instruct, and amuse you, he provides a glimpse into the magical universe of rural Portugal, and follows the continuum of the Cyprianic current through the various manifestations of The Book, finally placing it firmly in the hands of the people: the rural folk, the poor and impoverished, the hungry — people who will do anything to grasp at power, even if that means making a pact with the Devil himself.”

Fumigations of the Seven Planets

Fumigations of the Seven Planets by S Aldarnay, is a recent release from Hadean Press, which may be of interest. This is a short 16 page monograph, available directly from the publisher in print and digital formats.

S Aldarnay Fumigations of the Seven Planets from Hadean Press

“The recipes in this pamphlet have been compiled using the writing of Cornelius Agrippa, the author of the famous Three Books of Occult Philosophy. In these books, Agrippa outlines the history of and working behind much western magic including lengthy chapters dedicated to the influences of the 7 classical planets (the Sun, the Moon, Mars, Mercury, Jupiter, Venus, Saturn) on the world, and their applications in magical working. Owing to the inclusion of many animal parts or poisonous ingredients, many practitioners may feel perturbed at creating these recipes in their original form. In Fumigations of the Seven Planets, author S. Aldarnay offers alternatives based on the principles laid down by Agrippa himself.” [via]

Obeah

Obeah: A Sorcerous Ossuary by Nicholaj De Mattos Frisvold, with cover art by Kyle Fite, is a recent release from Hadean Press.

Nicholaj de Mattos Frisvold Kyle Fyte Obeah from Hadean Press

“Of all the Living Traditions, Obeah has remained the most elusive. Whilst Vodou and Santeria have had both academic and occult treatment in tomes widely available to the seeker, Obeah has stayed uncompromisingly rooted as a sorcerous tradition veiled in obscurity. In Obeah: A Sorcerous Ossuary, Nicholaj de Mattos Frisvold teases open this Caribbean mystery and reveals a crooked path into the hidden world of Papa Bones and Sasabonsam with a short monograph concerning the history of this incoherent cult and the ways in which power is bestowed upon and wielded by the Obeahman.

The text includes the Kabalistic Banquette of Lemegeton, the Hypostasis of Abysina Clarissa and the Green Beasts, a Kabalistic Mass for Anima Sola Mayanet, a Call to Papa Bones, a Call to Spirit Guides, a Call to Anima Sola Abysina Clarissa, the Missale Ezekiel Sasabonson or the Conjuration of the Shadow-Self, and the Ritual Reptilica de Anansi, and offers insights into the Obeahman’s special relationship with the spirits of wood, water, and bone.

This book is currently available in trade hardback and digital editions. We will also be releasing a very special hand bound and extremely limited edition of 21 copies. We are not taking reservations for the limited edition at this time.” [via]

The Petit Albert

The Spellbook of Marie Laveau: The Petit Albert is a pseudonymous work of Albertus Parvus Lucius translated by Talia Felix, available from Hadean Press, presumably from some version of the 18th Century French «Secrets merveilleux de la magie naturelle et cabalistique du Petit Albert», itself an apparent translation of a 13th Century Latin original. Although the cover states that this is the spellbook of Marie Laveau, the connection is apparently only circumstantial and speculative, according to the translator’s introduction. It is, however, a work of period significance, so may be of interest in itself.

Talia Felix's translationg of Petite Albert from Hadean Press

“The Petit Albert is a collection of recipes, talismans, and occult secrets attributed to several authors, chief among them Paracelsus, and compiled by a pseudonymous narrator who stresses that the secrets contained therein ‘do not in any way surpass the occult powers of nature; that is to say, of any of the known beings that are scattered throughout this vast universe, which are in the skies, in the winds, on the land and in the waters.’ This cautious reminder did not change the opinion of the Catholic Church in regards to the Petit Albert–it was a book of black magic and therefore to be avoided at all costs, an attitude which assured the book’s popularity among nobles, farmers, and priests alike.

From its first printing, the Book of the Fantastical Secrets of the Petit Albert made its way into the most rural of French hamlets and eventually to the colonies beyond, where it became a great success in the Caribbean and North America – especially in Québec in the north and in New Orleans in the south. It is there that the Petit Albert was almost certainly used by the hoodoo and voodoo practitioners of the nineteenth century, including the Voodoo Queen herself, Marie Laveau.

In The Spellbook of Marie Laveau: The Petit Albert, translator Talia Felix presents the full text of the Petit Albert in the English language, and offers a compelling argument that the Petit Albert was most likely one of the spellbooks in Laveau’s arsenal, if indeed she was literate at all. At the very least, as Ms. Felix states in her introduction to the book, ‘it presents a period-correct view of the sort of magical knowledge that was likely to have influenced the real and genuine life and works of the famous Marie Laveau, and of New Orleans Voodoo as a whole.'” [via]

 

Shopping for Hermetic and Alchemical Books in Amsterdam

Shopping for Hermetic and Alchemical Books in Amsterdam” is a post by Woody Evans, over on the Ultraculture group blog, about a visit to the Ritman Library and seeing the Bibliotheca Philosophica Hermetica collection. Also, I notice in passing that the Ritman Library’s website has been updated.

“Earlier this year I had the good fortune to find myself in Amsterdam. As a visit to the Bibliotheca Philosophica Hermetica was on my short list of “to do,” I hit the pavement and wandered through Jordaan until I found its very discreet position at No. 13, Bloemstraat. You’ve kind of got to work the city a little bit to find it, and surely it’s easier if you speak the Dutch. I don’t.” [via]

The final paragraph gives passing mention to the Esoteric Book Conference, a few publishers and a particular hat tip to the Hermetic Library:

“It’s worth mentioning the resurgence in fine alchemical printing going on at the moment — plenty to see and learn about new works at the Esoteric Book Conference (in Seattle, the 15-16 of September). And see also: Hadean Press, Papaveria, Fulgur. I think the folks at The Hermetic Library also know some some stories about the Ritman Collection.” [via]

The Serpent Tongue: Liber 187

You may be interested in The Serpent Tongue: Liber 187 by Jake Stratton-Kent, which is forthcoming in October from Hadean Press.

“A workbook of English Qaballa by Jake Stratton-Kent, with an introduction by Lon Milo DuQuette and cover art by Stuart Littlejohn.

The Serpent Tongue: Liber 187 was first published online in 2000 by Ye Olde Goat’s Shoppe and made available for personal use only. With the 2008 reappearance of The Equinox: British Journal of Thelema, in whose earlier incarnation much of the writing contained herein was first published, and subsequent renewed interest in the English Qaballa, permissions were obtained for the publication of a newly revised edition.”