Tag Archives: hakim bey

The Drunken Universe

The Drunken Universe: An Anthology of Persian Sufi Poetry, translated with commentary by Peter Lamborn Wilson (aka Hakim Bey) and Nasrollah Pourjavady, the 1999 paperback new edition from Omega Publications, is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

Peter Lamborn Wilson Nasrollah Pourjavady The Drunken Universe from Omega Publications

a few fragments from the introduction

Sufism can be seen to have functioned as a positive and healthy reaction to the overly rational activity of the philosophers and theologians. For the Sufis, the road to spiritual knowledge could never be confined to the process of purely intellectual activity, without the direct, immediate experience of the Heart.

In this book we are concerned with one art that the Sufis made peculiarly their own: poetry. Why should Sufis in general, and Persian Sufis in particular, choose to write poetry?

When they wanted to ‘be themselves’, lovers of the Truth, they needed a language more intense, closer to the center of human awareness than prose. Truth is beautiful, so when one speaks of it, one speaks beautifully. As the lover sings to his beloved, so did the Sufis to theirs. Love itself creates a taste for this language, so that even the prose writers of Sufism scatter verse throughout their works and create poetic prose.

The overwhelming theme of this poetry is the Love relationship between the individual, the lover, and his Beloved, God. What characterizes the Beloved is beauty, loveliness, His self-sufficiency or needlessness.

You must take these poems as mirrors; for you know that a mirror has no form of itself, but rather reflects the face of anyone who looks in it.‘ Ayn al-Qozat Hamadani”

 

The Hermetic Library Reading Room is an imaginary and speculative future reification of the library in the physical world, a place to experience a cabinet of curiosities offering a confabulation of curation, context and community that engages, archives and encourages a living Western Esoteric Tradition. If you would like to contribute to the Hermetic Library Reading Room, consider supporting the library or contact the librarian.

The Invisible Kingdom

Hermetic Library fellow T Polyphilus reviews The Invisibles Vol. 7: The Invisible Kingdom by Grant Morrison:

Grant Morrison's The Invisible Kingdom

 

This trade paper volume collects all twelve issues of the third and final Invisibles series. New characters are introduced, and the boundaries between the various conspiracies motivating the action become ever more porous as the eschaton is immanentized.

The closing series of the comic—especially its last issues—suffers from a surfeit of artists. It gets to the point where a single illustrator rarely has contributed more than two or three pages in sequence. In some cases, a shift of artistic style seems to be deliberately communicating a shift of perspective, but these seem to be the minority, and the visual idiolects are so divergent that the reader must struggle to identify characters and settings in panel after panel.

Once in a while, I would pause and try to bring “beginner’s mind” to bear on the dialogue of the book (especially the pronouncements of “expert” protagonists like King Mob and Helga), and I found that it was mostly sesquipedalian gibberish. For better or for worse, though, it’s the sort of gibberish that my conditioned mind understands and enjoys.

These comic books were originally issued in 1999 and 2000, and they are very much a product of their time. No one could or would write this sort of thing today. Even though the essential fears expressed here remain in force, our political context has rather dampened and shifted the corresponding hopes. Another book from the same period that has dated similarly is Hakim Bey’s Millennium. I would contrast Morrsion’s more concentrated and coherent effort in The Filth, which addresses many similar themes. [via]

 

 

The Hermetic Library Reading Room is an imaginary and speculative future reification of the library in the physical world, a place to experience a cabinet of curiosities offering a confabulation of curation, context and community that engages, archives and encourages a living Western Esoteric Tradition. If you would like to contribute to the Hermetic Library Reading Room, consider supporting the library or contact the librarian.

The Drunken Universe

Hermetic Library fellow T Polyphilus reviews The Drunken Universe: An Anthology of Persian Sufi Poetry by Peter Lamborn Wilson (also known as Hakim Bey):

Peter Lamborn Wilson's The Drunken Universe

 

The selections in this volume are terrific and the translations are lucid. The commentary is fairly restrained—much more could be written about any of the poems—and readers without much familiarity with Islam will probably miss many allusions. The appended “bio-bibliographies” of poets are succinct and helpful. The one genuinely bad thing about the book is the calligraphic font in which all the poems are set; it makes reading them more difficult and distracts from the beauty of the language and ideas. [via]

 

 

The Hermetic Library Reading Room is an imaginary and speculative future reification of the library in the physical world, a place to experience a cabinet of curiosities offering a confabulation of curation, context and community that engages, archives and encourages a living Western Esoteric Tradition. If you would like to contribute to the Hermetic Library Reading Room, consider supporting the library or contact the librarian.

Wanna Burn Something? Calling All Manifesters

Wanna Burn Something? Calling All Manifesters” by Eileen Joy over at In The Middle links to and quotes Hakim Bey‘s Temporary Autonomous Zone.

“Agents of chaos cast burning glances at anything or anyone capable of bearing witness to their condition, their fever of lux et voluptas.” — Hakim Bey, Temporary Autonomous Zone

The post itself is an announcement about a project by punctum books, an interesting and independent open-access publisher, to publish the proceedings from “BURN AFTER READING: TINY MANIFESTOS FOR A POST/MEDIEVAL STUDIES” a conference session sponsored by the postmedieval: a journal of medieval cultural studies. In addition to the already existing manifestos planned from the session participants, there is, in the post, an open invitation to others who may wish to contribute additional tiny manifestos about the field of post/medieval and premodern studies.

“It is now the intention of punctum books to publish these “tiny” manifestos as part of a double-volume with the proceedings of GW-MEMSI’s sponsored panel at this year’s 2013 Kalamazoo Congress on THE FUTURE WE WANT featuring this line-up:

· Field Change / Discipline Change: Asa Simon Mittman, Anne Harris (for The Material Collective)
·Institutional Change / Paradigm Change: Aranye Fradenburg, Eileen Joy
·Time Change / Mode Change: Will Stockton, Allan Mitchell
·World Change / Sea Change: Lowell Duckert, Steve Mentz
·Voice Change / Language Change: Chris Piuma, Jonathan Hsy
·Collective Change / Mood Change: Julie Orlemanski, Julian Yates

Per this blog post, I would like to invite everyone and anyone to consider contributing to the “tiny” half of this volume by sending punctum books (punctumbooks@gmail.com) a 2-3-page typed/double-spaced RANT relative to your beef(s) about the “state of the field” and/or to your impassioned vision for a field-to-be (we’re talking premodern studies here, of any temporal bent from Year Zero to 1800).” [via]

Check out the full post for more details, and an example of what they are seeking.

Hakim Bey and Hakim Bey’s Temporary Autonomous Zone are linked to in the notes for Solipsistic Nation No. 268: Secret Archives of the Vatican

Hakim Bey and Hakim Bey’s Temporary Autonomous Zone are linked to in the notes for Solipsistic Nation No. 268: Secret Archives of the Vatican, a podcast interview with Vince Millett of the Broken Drum Records artist Secret Archives of the Vatican.

 

American Idol: On Nietzsche in America

American Idol: On Nietzsche in America” by Ross Posnock is an article in the Nation from Nov, 2011 which talks about Friedrich Nietzsche and a book American Nietzsche: A History of an Icon and His Ideas by Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen.

 

“Nietzsche paid a heavy price for daring to strip away the comforting props of Victorian piety, bringing readers face to face with the imperative ‘to become what you are.’ He launched his own version of Emerson’s project, which begins with the recognition that man is but ‘a half-man,’ a ‘dwarf of himself.’ The time was ripe: how thrilling it must have been for Americans long shackled to the ‘agonized conscience’ of Puritan rectitude, the ‘yoke’ of the genteel, in George Santayana’s phrasing. Cease hiding behind conformity and habit and laziness, Emerson and Nietzsche implore; the former invites ‘every man to expand to the full circle of the universe,’ while the latter will eventually call for the overcoming of the human, summoning what he will name the ‘overman.'” [via]

 

“Nietzsche-mania erupted in Europe a decade before the philosopher’s death in 1900, spreading throughout the continent and on to Russia, and reaching the United States in the new century’s first decade. A question raised almost at once (and periodically revived) was why Nietzsche was proving so popular here: ‘What is the philosophy of an anti-Christian, antidemocratic madman doing in a culture like ours? Why Nietzsche? Why in America?’ Ratner-Rosenhagen wonders. Nietzsche became the exemplar for those seeking, in Emerson’s words, ‘not instruction, but provocation’; not intellectual doctrine but the visceral sense of liberation in hearing the inadmissible given voice. Radical leftists—anarchists, socialists and feminists—were early enthusiasts, including Emma Goldman, Randolph Bourne and the Harlem socialist Hubert Harrison, who found in Nietzsche’s contempt for religion and democracy a way to rouse the masses from obedience to Christian ideals of submission and democratic fictions of a free market.” [via]

 

 

Of course, Friedrich Nietzsche is proclaimed Saint of Ecclesia Gnostica Catholica in the Gnostic Mass and there are other resources in the collection of the Hermetic Library. You may also be interested in these other articles at the library which mention Nietszche, to name a few:

Recent Chicago Reader post links to Hakim Bey’s TAZ: The Temporary Autonomous Zone, Ontological Anarchy, Poetic Terrorism

Recent Chicago Reader post at “A conversation with seapunks” links to Hakim Bey‘s TAZ: The Temporary Autonomous Zone, Ontological Anarchy, Poetic Terrorism while discussing a new microgenre of music and culture, and poses an abrupt critique of the typical implementation of and culture around temporary autonomous zones.

“I find the sort of spontaneous community building that seapunk embodies not only fascinating but also genuinely inspiring. (It’s like seeing Hakim Bey’s Temporary Autonomous Zone come to life, except without a bunch of tedious, quasi-intellectual Burning Man stereotypes involved.) I also have a predisposition toward ravey shit and I’m a professional Internet junkie, so there’s that too.” [via]