Tag Archives: hierarchies

An Historical Summary of Angelic Hierarchies from Part VII: The “Seven” Thrones in In Operibus Sigillo Dei Aemeth by David Richard Jones.

“Thus for these three movements there are three movers. Moreover, the whole of this heaven moves and revolves with the epicycle from east to west once every day. Whether this movement derives from some intellect or from the pull of the Primum Mobile, only God knows, for it seems to me presumptuous to reach a conclusion on this point.” [via]

 


Dante Alighieri

 

An Historical Summary of Angelic Hierarchies from Part VII: The “Seven” Thrones in In Operibus Sigillo Dei Aemeth by David Richard Jones.

“According to the best demonstration of the astrologers as we find it summarized in the book of the Constellations of the Stars, these movements are three: one according to which the star moves along its epicycle; a second according to which the epicycle moves together with the whole heaven in concert with that of the Sun; a third according to which that whole heaven moves, following the movement of the starry sphere, from west to east, one degree every one hundred years.” [via]

 


Dante Alighieri

 

An Historical Summary of Angelic Hierarchies from Part VII: The “Seven” Thrones in In Operibus Sigillo Dei Aemeth by David Richard Jones.

“Consequently it is reasonable to believe that the movers of the heaven of the Moon belong to the order of Angels, and those of Mercury to that of the Archangels, and those of Venus to that of the Thrones; all of whom, receiving their nature from the love of the Holy Spirit, perform their operation, which is innate in them, namely, the movement of that heaven, filled with love, from which the form of the said heaven derives a potent ardor by which the souls here below are kindled to love, according to their disposition.” [via]

 


Dante Alighieri

 

An Historical Summary of Angelic Hierarchies from Part VII: The “Seven” Thrones in In Operibus Sigillo Dei Aemeth by David Richard Jones.

“In this way, Thrones became described as various types of fiery wheels in relation to their function in the chariot of God, as in Ezekiel 1: 15–20:

Now as I beheld the living creates, behold one wheel upon the earth by the living creatures, with his four faces. The appearance of the wheels and their work was like unto the color of a beryl: and they four had one likeness: and their appearance and their work was as it were a wheel in the middle of a wheel. When they went, they went upon their four sides: and they turned not when they went. As for their rings, they were so high that they were dreadful; and their rings were full of eyes round about them four. And when the living creatures went, the wheels went by them: and when the living creatures were lifted up from the earth, the wheels were lifted up. Withersoever the spirit was to go, they went, thither was their spirit to go; and the wheels of the living creature was in the wheels. When those went, these went; and when those stood, these stood; and when those were lifted up from the earth, the wheels were lifted up over against them: for the spirit of the living creature was in the wheels.” [via]

An Historical Summary of Angelic Hierarchies from Part VII: The “Seven” Thrones in In Operibus Sigillo Dei Aemeth by David Richard Jones.

“It is in the Celestial Hierarchy that the Thrones become situated and defined with the structure of subsequent Christian metaphysics, and from this context that essentially all further elaborations are derived.

The Thrones and their celestial functions are given in chapters II, V–VII, and XI of the Celestial Hierarchy, wherein they are described as being symbolically represented by ‘some kind of fiery wheels above the heavens, or material thrones upon which the Supreme Deity may recline,’ and further as great wheels, covered with numerous eyes, marking the end of the uppermost choir or hierarchy of angels where the emanations from God begin to take on material form.” [via]

An Historical Summary of Angelic Hierarchies from Part VII: The “Seven” Thrones in In Operibus Sigillo Dei Aemeth by David Richard Jones.

“Although scholarly opinion differs as to its date of composition and origin, the earliest form of this text can be traced to what is now referred to as that Aramaic Levi Document. And though the text of The Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs is clearly a compilation by an early Christian author (circa 2C C.E.), it is now known with certainty to have been derived from pre-Christian, and probably sectarian Jewish sources.” [via]

An Historical Summary of Angelic Hierarchies from Part VII: The “Seven” Thrones in In Operibus Sigillo Dei Aemeth by David Richard Jones.

“It is important to understand that there was, for Dee and Kelly, a standard Renaissance view of the divine order and the place of the various echelons of angels within that hierarchy. This view was defined primarily from scripture, but drew the precise form that it did from the Celestial Hierarchy of St. Denis, the Aereopagite, so-called.” [via]

Hierarchies Recapitulated from Part VII: The “Seven” Thrones in In Operibus Sigillo Dei Aemeth by David Richard Jones.

“We add the following as a demonstration of the consistency of this division in regard to the Thrones.

Mi: Of those seven Seals and the seven semicircles than contain them “the 7 angles next unto the uppermost Circumference”

Ur: “Those 7 letters, are the 7 Seats of the One everlasting GOD. His 7 secret Angels proceeding from every letter and Cross so formed.”

Michael & Uriel, Liber Mysteriorum Secundus 20 March 1582″ [via, see]