Tag Archives: j d holmes

The Battle of Blythe Road

The Battle of Blythe Road: A Golden Dawn Affair: Aleister Crowley and the Revolt of the Adepti edited and introduced by Darcy Kuntz, with material on and from Aleister Crowley, William Wynn Westcott, William Butler Yeats, Florence Farr and more from a pivotal moment for the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn and Western esotericism as a whole, Vol 14 of the Golden Dawn Studies Series, the 2005 second edition published by J D Holmes, is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

Darcy Kuntz The Battle of Blythe Road

“The history of the magical battle that Crowley ignited so he could win control of the Second Order of the Golden Dawn. Included are a number of the official documents that were issued as fallout from the events and excerpts from Crowley’s diary from that period.” [via]

The Serpent Myth

The Serpent Myth by William Wynn Westcott and Arthur Edward Waite, edited by Darcy Kuntz, Vol 9 of the Golden Dawn Studies Series, the 2006 third revised and enhanced edition published by J D Holmes, is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

William Wynn Westcott Arthur Edward Waite The Serpent Myth

“An excellent treatise on this ancient symbol from the inner knowledge of the Golden Dawn system. First edition published in 1996. Revised with A. E. Waite’s paper on the Serpent Myth in 2001.” [via]

The Enochian Experiments of the Golden Dawn

The Enochian Experiments of the Golden Dawn: Enochian Alphabet Clairvoyantly Examined by Florence Farr, edited with an introduction and notes by Darcy Kuntz, Vol 7 of the Golden Dawn Studies Series, the 2007 third revised edition published by J D Holmes, is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

Florence Farr The Enochian Experiments of the Golden Gawn

“The experiments Farr conducted with the Sphere Group in 1901 with the events and experiences chronicled in her diary. Keys to the Enochian Language; a corrected Holy Table; and a rare full page plate also are included.” [via]

The Serpent’s Path

The Serpent’s Path: The Magical Plays of Florence Farr, compiled, edited and introduced by Darcy Kuntz, Vol 25 of the Golden Dawn Studies Series, the 2005 revised edition published by J D Holmes, is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

Florence Farr The Serpent's Path from Golden Dawn Studies Series

This volume contains four plays by Florence Farr: The Beloved of Hathor, The Shrine of the Golden Hawk, The Mystery of Time, and A Dialogue of Vision.

Nightside of Eden

Nightside of Eden by Kenneth Grant is being republished by Starfire Publishing, and is scheduled for release in March, 2014. It is currently on pre-order in both a standard edition, available directly and, for US and CA, from J D Holmes, and in a deluxe edition available directly.

Kenneth Grant Nightside of Eden from Starfire 2014

“The republishing of the Typhonian Trilogies continues with the release in March 2014 of the fourth volume in the series, Nightside of Eden, which opens the second of the three trilogies. Originally published by Muller in 1977, it was subsequently reissued by Skoob Publishing in 1994. This new edition of 1500 copies is freshly typeset in an octavo format of 316 pages. Sewnbound hardback, with a frontispiece, a twenty-page section of plates, illustrated endpapers and a full-colour dustjacket, this republication integrates the errata from the Skoob edition within the text, and incorporates further corrections noted subsequently in Kenneth Grant’s personal copy of the book. Many of the plates have been rephotographed, and some are printed in colour.” [via]

“There exists a map of consciousness, with its light and dark byways, in the form of a qabalistic glyph known as the Tree of Life. It has its roots in the primal earth of Eden, but its branches extend into extra-terrestrial dimensions. This Tree, which is a familiar concept to mystics and magicians alike, has another side, a nightside which receives but passing mention in contemporary manuals of occultism; as if the ancient writings of the Arabs and Jews contained allusions to mere figures of speech and monstrous fancies.

Nightside of Eden interprets the symbolism of the Tree of Death, the ‘other’ side of the Tree of Life which forms the basis of the Western Occult Tradition. Kenneth Grant, whose Typhonian Trilogies have infused new life and meaning into ancient and forgotten mysteries, here provides an exhaustive survey of the other side of the Tree, haunted by dark forces that are today seeping insidiously into human consciousness and threatening it with violent disruption. The creative magical current represented by Aleister Crowley, Charles Stansfeld Jones, Austin Osman Spare, and in our day by Michael Bertiaux, Margaret Cook, and others, is here traced to its source in the formless voids beyond the threshold of mentation.

Nightside of Eden is an explication of the Cult of Choronzon and an initiated exposition of the Mysteries of the Left-Hand Path in relation to Western Occultism. Here, for the first time, the head of a genuine Magical Organization reveals the esoteric doctrines of the ‘black’ magic of the Left-Hand Path, as well as the practical application of psycho-sexual formulae of which very little is generally known.

The book is illustrated not only with the demonic sigils of the ‘other side’, which make of it a grimoire of the Dark Doctrine, but also by curious works of siderealism, or stellar art, sprung from the New Aeon consciousness which permeates those occult Orders working in harmony with the Typhonian Tradition.” [via]

Snowdrops from a Curate’s Garden

Snowdrops from a Curate’s Garden by Aleister Crowley has been published by Edda Publications, Sweden, recently in a new edition, edited and with an introduction by Vere Chappell, illustrated by Fredrik Söderberg, and available directly or, in the US, from Weiser Antiquarian and J D Holmes. The first 43 copies of 418 total is a limited edition slipcased volume, with a separate signed silkscreen print by the artist.

Aleister Crowley Vere Chappell Fredrik Soderberg Snowdrops from a Curate's Garden from Edda Publications

“While at his Scottish retreat Boleskine in 1903, Aleister Crowley decided to amuse his wife Rose and their friends by writing pornography – one new section each day. He concocted a tale that managed to be marvelously creative and utterly repugnant at the same time. No taboo escaped unviolated – sodomy, pederasty, bestiality, necrophilia, urolagnia, and coprophagia all figure prominently in the text. The protagonist is no less than an Archbishop, incorporating the grand tradition of anti-clericalism which had been a feature of popular pornography for centuries. Many contemporary figures were also made objects of satire, although they were also rendered “nameless” by the use of elision, or omitted letters. The overall result is more absurd than obscene, owing more to Cervantes, Rabelais, Sade and Apollinaire than to the run-of-the-mill pornography of the time. Writing a chapter a day, in the evenings Crowley read it aloud to the audience assembled in the household, with the exception of his Aunt Annie. Reportedly this had the intended effect of amusing Rose, and doubtless the rest of the party, especially since some of them and their old friends from Paris were featured characters. Poor old Aunt Annie even ended up having a role in the tale.

Lavishly illustrated in 38 images by Fredrik Söderberg. The book also contains an in-depth introduction by its editor, American sexologist Vere Chappell.” [via]

De Arte Magica

De Arte Magica, one of the technical books by Aleister Crowley, published as a pamphlet by Sure Fire Press and the Holmes Publishing Group, is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

Aleister Crowley's De Arte Magica (Liber CDXIV, Book 414) from Sure Fire Press and Holmes Publishing Group

This is Liber CDXIV (Book 414) and was originally written by Crowley between Sep 6 and Oct 8, 1914. Although this document was released and widely disseminated by Ordo Templi Orientis under the same limited license as the other text files, it is now considered by the Order to be under seal of a particular degree. One particular chapter of this book, “Of Eroto-comatose Lucidity”, is still widely available as Liber CDLI (Book 451). Another special edition of this text is still available from J D Holmes, as of the time of this post, from a limited run of 9 hand-numbered copies, published in 2001.

 

 

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Aleister Crowley and the Hidden God

Starfire Publishing is soon releasing a new re-issue of Kenneth Grant’s Aleister Crowley and the Hidden God. The standard edition hardcover of 1500 copies will be available in the new year directly from Starfire in the UK and Europe or J D Holmes in the US and Canada, and there will be two editions. The deluxe edition limited to 111 copies is available directly from Starfire, “bound in hand-made paper, with an additional leather quarter-binding across the spine. The book will be slip-cased, with full-colour dust-jacket, and come with black and white custom printed endpapers, and with top and tail bands to the binding. Each copy will be hand-numbered, and signed by Steffi Grant.”

Kenneth Grant's Aleister Crowley and the Hidden God from Starfire Publishing

“The republishing of the Typhonian Trilogies continues with the second volume in the series, Aleister Crowley and the Hidden God, first published by Muller in 1973 and subsequently reissued by Skoob Publishing in 1992. This new edition of 1500 copies is freshly typeset in an octavo format of 246 pages. Sewnbound hardback, with a sixteen-page section of plates, illustrated endpapers and a full-colour dustjacket, this republication integrates the errata from the Skoob edition within the text, and incorporates further corrections noted subsequently in Kenneth Grant’s personal copy of the book. Where possible, plates have been rephotographed, and some are presented in colour. There are also some new plates included by Steffi Grant.” [via]

Kenneth Grant's Aleister Crowley and the Hidden God from Starfire Publishing inscription

“Aleister Crowley vowed to free man from bondage by showing him how to invoke his latent genius ─ the Hidden God. It is characteristic of Crowley that to this end he utilised the mysterious energies of sex: the most potent, most obsessive of man’s illusions which, if used unintelligently, strengthens the false sense of individual existence that divorces him from the fullness of cosmic consciousness.

Aleister Crowley and the Hidden God is an exhaustive and critical study of Crowley’s system of sexual magick and the strange rites which he practised and advocated for the purpose of promoting the Law of Freedom with its formula of “Love under Will”. The book reveals the occult workings of the Fire Snake or Kundalini-Goddess, the cosmic power in man which, when awakened by magical means, assumes an external form identified by Crowley as the Scarlet Woman, she who influences the secret power-zones in the body of man and invokes the Hidden God.

Here Kenneth Grant also describes a method of dream control involving the use of the Ophidian Current transmitted by Crowley, Spare, Fortune, Grosche, and others. Its object is to establish contact with extra-terrestrial and non-human beings with the ultimate purpose of transcending the limitations of personality and of realising cosmic consciousness, thus fulfilling the magical formula of the New Aeon.

Aleister Crowley and the Hidden God is here republished in an enhanced edition. Freshly typeset, it incorporates the errata from the Skoob reissue as well as correcting anomalies on the basis of annotations in Kenneth Grant’s personal copy. Some of the existing plates will be present in colour; and there will be some new plates by Steffi Grant as well, one of which is here illustrated at the right. Aleister Crowley and the Hidden God is issued in both a standard and a limited, numbered and signed edition.” [via]

Beelzebub and the Beast

Beelzebub and the Beast [also] by David Hall is a “an engrossing comparative study of two of the Twentieth Century’s most colourful gurus, George Gurdjieff and Aleister Crowley.” The title is due to be available in October from Starfire Publishing with a deluxe edition available in November. Pre-orders are available in the US and Canada through J D Holmes and elsewhere directly from the publisher.

 

 

“David Hall, who died in 2007, will be a familiar name to many as one of the founders and editors of SOTHiS, the substantial and diverse Thelemic magazine which was published from the United Kingdom in the 1970s. David was passionately interested in the work of Gurdjieff as well as that of Crowley, and in the early to mid 1970s he wrote this penetrating study comparing the work of both men. Unfortunately it failed to find a publisher at the time, although publication was referenced as forthcoming in Kenneth Grant’s Nightside of Eden. (Muller, 1977)

Crowley took an interest in the work of the Greek-Armenian occultist G. I. Gurdjieff, and visited Gurdjieff’s Institute for the Harmonious Development of Man in Fontainebleau in 1924 and 1926. There have been other comparative studies of the work of the two men, the most recent being The Three Dangerous Magi by P. T. Mistlberger (O Books, 2010).

Examining in turn the life and work of the two men at various levels, the author discerns a common source. Commenting circa 1919 on the first chapter of The Book of the Law, Crowley wrote ‘Aiwaz is not as I had supposed a mere formula, like many angelic names, but is the true most ancient name of the God of the Yezidis, and thus returns to the highest Antiquity. Our work is therefore historically authentic, the rediscovery of the Sumerian Tradition’. Similarly, the author here shows that the roots of Gurdjieff’s work can be traced to the same source.

With a full-colour wrap-around dustjacket, a substantial Foreword by Alistair Coombs, plates, tables and line-drawings throughout the text, a Bibliography, a comprehensive Index, and an Afterword about the author, this book will be of considerable interest to many.” [via]

 

“Limited Edition of 750 copies only. A Fine Hardcover Volume, illustrated end papers, and in a custom full color dust jacket based on the painting, MELEK TAUS by Stuart Littlejohn, which features the Peacock Angel emerging from a Yezidi arch, plus a substantial Foreword by Alistair Coombs, with plates, tables and line drawings throughout the text. Michael Staley has constructed a comprehensive index and bibliography, and has also written an Afterword about the author. 350 pages. Octavo.” [via]

New website for Abraxas journal

Abraxas: International Journal of Esoteric Studies has a new dedicated website which you might want to check out. You can still find the old Abraxas pages at the site for Fulgur Limited, but I would imagine the new site will become the go to place for the journal.

As an aside, it appears there are only a few copies of the first issue left and apparently only a few copies of quite a number of the other books in the Fulgur catalogue. You can gander at those on the UK and Eurpoean Catalogue page, or in the US check out the Fulgur Limited page at J D Holmes.