Tag Archives: J S Kupperman

Aurum Solis

J S Kupperman reviews Aurum Solis: Initiation Ceremonies and Inner Magical Techniques [Amazon, Publisher, Local Library] by Osborne Phillips in the Journal of the Western Mystery Tradition archive.

Phillips Aurum Solis

Osborne Phillips, former Chief of the Ogdoadic occult order known as the Aurum Solis, here reveals for the first time the initiatory ceremonies of that order, along with papers on their symbolism, the symbolism of the officers and some of the magical techniques and visualizations utilized in those rituals. The main symbolism of the Aurum Solis is Greek, though utilized with an hermetic understanding and with corresponding hermetic techniques. Officer titles in this degree include Hermes, the Initiator and Archmagus and Asklepias, the Assistant Adept. The third and final degree of the Aurum Solis combines Greek symbolism along with Egyptian and other ancient traditions. Aurum Solis provides a brief history of the Order and also discusses the initiatory pattern used by the Aurum Solis’ initiatory scheme known as the Fivefold Pattern of the House of Sacrifice. The book is then divided into two sections, the first dealing with the first two degrees or Outer Order of the Aurum Solis, the second concerning the third degree or Inner Order.

The Outer Order chapters, after the introduction, first discuss the temple set up used by the Aurum Solis, describing the placement of its furniture, banners and other symbolic “decoration”. Next the symbolism of the temple officers, their vestments or clothing and their pentacles or lamens is discussed. After this a ritual consecration of the temple space, along with explanations and visualizations is given. Finally the first and second degrees, called the Neophyte of the Great Work and Servitor of the Secret Flame, respectively, are given, again along with symbolism, descriptions of movements, magical techniques and visualizations.

The second section, concerning the Inner Order, follows a similar format as the previous section. First the Telesterion, the special temple or magical working space associated solely with the Aurum Solis’ third degree, is described. Next the officers and their regalia are described, along with their symbolism. The next chapter concerns the “Great One of Enchantments,” which is the name of the special Egyptian wand used in the third degree initiation, is described, along with its consecration ritual. Fourth the ritual of the third degree, called the Votary of the Sun, is described and explained. Finally there is a chapter called “The Bond of Light” that gives the consecration ritual for the Tessera; the symbol of the Work of the Aurum Solis.

Aurum Solis is an important addition to the already existing corpus of Aurum Solis materials. While it does not appear to provide the complete secrets of the Order’s initiation ceremonies on the level that Pat Zalewski’s Golden Dawn Rituals and Commentaries does, it does provide the beginning magician a framework to operate under and the experienced magician enough tools to fill in the blanks. It completes, as it were, the purpose of the Aurum Solis Magical Philosophy series, which previously gave its readers the important techniques and philosophies of the Order. The only drawback of the book is its complete lack of diagrams and drawings.

Talismans & Evocations of the Golden Dawn

J S Kupperman reviews Talismans & Evocations of the Golden Dawn by Pat Zalewski [Bookshop, Amazon, Abebooks] in Journal of the Western Mystery Tradition, Vol 1, No 5.

Zalewski Talismans and Evocations of the Golden Dawn

Talismans and Evocations marks Pat Zalewski’s return to commercial publishing. This latest work, just one of several planned with Thoth Publications, like many of his previous books is a unique contribution to the corpus of Golden Dawn related literature already available today. The book is divided into two sections. The first and longer section discusses the art of evocation. The second much shorter section deals with the creation and consecration of talismans.

There have been no previous publications about the Golden Dawn’s teachings concerning evocation, making Talismans and Evocations unique in subject matter. This initial section is divided into five chapters dealing with history, the “Z documents” of the Golden Dawn’s inner order, the seven rays of Theosophy, angelic hierarchies, astrology and application and tools. Section two, Talismans, consists of a single chapter. However, this chapter discusses topics ranging from talismatic or magical images to magic squares called kameas to the creations and use of sigils. The first section begins with a ritual of evocation written and performed by several of the more famous members of the Golden Dawn, including Florence Farr and Alan Bennett. The second section ends with a ritual of talisman consecration written by Alan Bennett.

As usual Mr. Zalewski’s writing brings something new to the field of Golden Dawn magic and is thus a valuable resource for any student of the Golden Dawn. The real value in this book is that it is not just a “how to do magic” book. Instead Talismans and Evocations provides the reader with all of the tools necessary for them to figure out how to write their own rituals. It should be noted, however, that this is not a book for beginners. Proper use of the information contained in its pages depends greatly upon the experience and knowledge of the reader, such as a thorough understanding of the Golden Dawn’s inner order’s (the RR et AC) Z formula and the basic principle of occultism as espoused by the RR et AC.

Mr. Zalewski offers a great deal from the historic perspective as well. For the first time rituals and teachings written and used by members of the Golden Dawn are published along with copious amounts of notation by the author. This includes not only the previously mentioned rituals of evocation and talismanic consecration but also rituals for the consecration of the adept’s magical weapons that had not been seen before, coming from notebooks from the New Zealand branch of the Stella Matutina, one of the offshoots of the Golden Dawn after the 1904 schism.

As with any book there are a few errors and inconsistencies. These mostly have to do with editing; there are numerous typographical errors, missing words and a handful of repeated paragraphs. Others appear to stem from the book having been written over an extended period of time. For instance on a section concerning the ritual of the hexagram the notation states that the unicursal hexagram will be used in the diagram and explanations as it is much easier to use than the traditional hexagram. A few pages later, however, one finds the diagrams of the traditional hexagrams as well as the so-called hexagrams of Saturn, which should have also been omitted.

Pat Zalewski’s Talismans and Evocations of the Golden Dawn is a valuable resource in the genre of Golden Dawn magic. For the first time anywhere the Golden Dawn’s teachings on the practice of evocation and the creation of talismans are published in a single volume. Despite typographical errors and the occasional internal inconsistency Talismans and Evocations is highly readable and informative. This book would be an excellent addition to the library of either the student of occult history or the practicing magician.

Gates of Light / Sha’Are Orah

J. S. Kupperman reviews Gates of Light / Sha’Are Orah by Rabbi Joseph Gikatilla, translated by Avi Weinstein, in the archive of the Journal of the Western Mystery Tradition.

Gikatilla Weinstein Gates of Light

While there are many books discussing Jewish Cabala today, there are only a handful of primary sources available to the English reader. Written in the 13th century, Rabbi Joseph Gikatilla’s Sha’are Orah or “Gates of Light” can be added to the list of original Jewish Cabalistic texts that have been fully translated into English (a list that includes the Sepher Yetzirah and the Bahir, as well as the Zohar; though there is only one rather expensive English translation of this to-date) whereas many other cabalistic manuscripts have not been translated at all.

Gates of Light takes the reader, step by step, through each of the ten Sephiroth of the Tree of Life. Each chapter discusses in-depth many of the aspects of a particular Sefirah, but for the chapter which covers both Hod and Netzach, which are taken together as their functions are so complimentary to one another that they function often as almost a single Sefira. Primarily, the Divine Name or Names associated with each Sefira is discussed. This discussion often moves to moral concepts applicable to the Sefira in question; how one Sefira relates to another, and even how segments from Torah or the Talmud should be interpreted by the light of Cabala.

While valuable simply because it is a primary source for traditional Cabala, Gates of Light may be even more valuable and interesting for those who have only studied hermetic or magical Cabala. The descriptions of the Sefirot and Divine Names, even the very attitude that the writer takes towards his writing, are very different from those found in hermetic Cabalistic texts. Many concepts, such as the Resurrected God being integral to the makeup of the Sephira Tiferet, are not to be found. Instead one finds that Tiferet is the place of balanced Divine Justice or that visions and prophecy are directly related to Hod and Netzach while true and perfect vision comes from Tiferet. At the same time, familiar concepts are included, such as Tiferet being the focal point of the Tree of Life, balancing the Sefirot above and below it. The reader discovers both the many dissimilarities and similarities between hermetic and Jewish Cabala.

Though not always clearly written, and often digressing into sub-topics, Gates of Light can give the reader valuable insight into the nature of the Sefirot and the Divine unavailable in other traditional Cabalistic texts or in books written from the hermetic point of view. A primary source for traditional Jewish Cabala, and written even before the famous Zohar, Rabbi Joseph Gikatilla’s Gates of Light is a valuable addition to the library of any Cabalist.

Paths of Wisdom

J. S. Kupperman reviews Paths of Wisdom: Principles and Practices of the Magical Cabala in the Western Tradition by Hermetic Library Fellow John Michael Greer in the archive of the Journal of the Western Mystery Tradition.

Greer Paths of Wisdom

At first John Michael Greer’s Paths of Wisdom appears to be just one of dozens of hermetic Cabalistic primers that are already available to the public. A deeper look shows, however, that Paths is much more akin to the Dion Fortune’s magnum opus The Mystical Qabalah. Indeed, additional study shows that Paths goes even farther than that seminal work.

Paths of Wisdom is divided into three sections; Principles of the Magical Cabala, Symbolism of the Magical Cabala and Practice of the Magical Cabala. Each section is effectively a separate primer for beginner, intermediate and advanced theories and practices involving the hermetic Cabala.

The introduction and the first six chapters which comprise part one of the book, discuss the history of the magical or hermetic Cabala, as well as the basic concepts surrounding the Tree of Life, the main glyph or symbol of the Cabala. First, the reader will learn about the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, whose practices for working on the Tree of Life Greer describes in the third section of the book, along with the order’s theories concerning the Tree of Life and the Cabala. Greer then describes the Tree itself, its Sefirot or ten basic manifestations of deity, and its Netivot, or the connecting paths between the Sefirot. Also discussed are the Macrocosm and Microcosm and the mystical paths Greer calls “the Way of Creation” and “the Way of Redemption”.

The second part of the book which comprises the bulk of Paths of Wisdom, contains an in-depth description of the ten Sefirot and the twenty-two Netivot of the Tree of Life. These descriptions include practical information such as the Name of God ascribed to each Sefirot or Path, their magical image and associated colors, all of which would be used in hermetic Cabalistic ritual. Going further though, each chapter discusses each of these listed associations, describing what they mean in relation to the Sefirot or Netivoth in question. Each aspect of symbolism is illustrated for the reader and connected to similar symbols existing in other areas of the Tree.

The third and final section of Paths covers everything from the basic theories of ceremonial magic, such as the Watcher on the Threshold and the Tools of the Magician’s Trade; to basic practices including the protective ritual known as the Lesser Banishing Ritual of the Pentagram. In later chapters the reader is introduced to more advanced practices such as pathworking or skyring on the Tree of Life and magical prayer. Finally there is a discussion on bringing the Magical Cabala into one’s everyday life.

Paths of Wisdom: Principles and Practice of the Magical Cabala in the Western Tradition is an excellent introduction to the Magical Cabala. Its language is clear and easy to understand and its descriptions of both ritual practice and the various parts of the Tree of Life are detailed and insightful. While containing very basic information, the book is none-the-less useful for the intermediate and advanced reader on the subject. Its constructive references and diagrams make it a valuable addition to the library of any hermetic Cabalist.

Golden Dawn Rituals and Commentaries

J S Kupperman reviews Golden Dawn Rituals and Commentaries by Pat Zalewski at Temples, Portals and Vaults in Journal of the Western Mystery Tradition, No 0, Introduction to the Western Mystery Tradition.

Zalewski Golden Dawn Rituals and Commentaries

Zalewksi brings student of the Golden Dawn tradition previously unpublished material from one of the original off-shoot Temples of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn.

The work is published in three volumes, each dealing with a differing aspect of the Golden Dawn. Volume one includes an introduction and history of the Golden Dawn and the Smaragdum Thalasses (ST), the New Zealand branch of the Order founded by Dr. Felkin after the schism in 1903. The rest of the volume contains the grade ceremonies of the Outer Order as used by the ST. The reader may find that these ceremonies somewhat different from previously published versions. Zalewski states that they more closely resemble those used by the original GD and Mathers’ Alpha et Omega than those used by the Stella Matutina.

Volume two consists of Zalewksi’s commentaries on the rituals, as well as anecdotal accounts from his teacher Jack Taylor, a 7=4 and long-time Hierophant under Mrs. Felkin. Each ritual commentary has its own introduction, diagrams, and figures, including tarot cards for each path. Those familiar with Zalekwski’s The Magical Tarot of the Golden Dawn will find that these tarot cards differ from those used in his first self-published book. Where this volume shines, however, is in its publication of parts of a 6=5 paper on the god-forms and currents of energy in the temple by Moina Mathers.

Volume three of Rituals and Commentaries focuses on the Portal and Adeptus Minor initiation rituals. This volume contains both the ritual texts and commentaries on these ceremonies, as well as the list of 302 endnotes.

Aside from material written by Moina Mathers, Zalewksi provides a great deal of information on Golden Dawn ritual from a point of view that may be completely new to many readers. Not only does he discuss some of the standard interpretations of Golden Dawn material, but he also provides his own interpretations based on his experiences with Taylor and Chakra and Kundalini practice.

Rather than reproducing the Mathers material in full, Zalewski instead incorporates it into his commentaries and diagrams, demonstrating where the various god-forms are stationed and their relation to the pattern of energy in the hall. It is interesting to note that the god-forms used throughout the grade ceremonies differ radically from what might be expected. God-forms used in the 0=0 hall are not necessarily the same as used in other halls, and the same god-form may be used by different officers or stations in different halls. Numerous diagrams are included in these volumes, some of which have never been printed before and many of which differ from those used by the Stella Matutina.

As interesting and informative as this book may be, it still has its problems. Chief among these is the numerous typographical errors. A more thorough editing job would have easily remedied these difficulties.

Originally the publication was meant to be released as separate books by Llewellyn Publications as the Z-5 series. Zalewski did not, however, adequately revise his work to compensate for the merging of the separate works into one whole. The result is noticeable redundancy. The introductory paragraphs to the ritual commentaries are largely repetitive, indicating that they were intended to be printed in separate books, providing minimal new information in each introduction.

Published in 2000, the book was written in the early and mid 1990s. The historical information provided in the first volume, while interesting, is in some cases outdated, and includes several references to the publication dates of Zalewksi’s own work. These volumes were apparently intended to be released before the publication of The Magical Tarot of the Golden Dawn, which was published a few years before.

While the typos and occasional redundancy contained in Golden Dawn Rituals and Commentaries can be annoying at times, they in no manner outweigh the importance of the new information in its volumes. The Mathers information alone will make this book invaluable to Golden Dawn scholars and magicians alike. The anecdotal information from Taylor as well as Zalewski’s unique insight (whether one agrees with his conclusions or not) more than make Golden Dawn Rituals and Commentaries a worthwhile book and an excellent addition to anyone’s Golden Dawn library.

Journal of the Western Mystery Tradition, Vernal Equinox 2014

Journal of the Western Mystery Tradition, No. 26, Vol. 3., Vernal Equinox 2014, is available and may be of interest.

J S Kupperman Odin JWMT Vernal Equinox 2014
Odin by J.S. Kupperman, cover art

“What can be said about the Gods that has not already been said or written? Humanity’s oldest surviving writings are about Gods and heroes. We haven’t stopped writing about them, telling stories about them, or otherwise being engaged with them, ever since. The presence of the Gods in magic and theurgy has been, until very recently, ubiquitous. And today, after the spread of monothesim for some 3,000 years, we begin to see a revival of old ways combined with new traditions dedicated to Gods that have sometimes not seen steady worship in hundreds of years.

This issue of the Journal of the Western Mystery Tradition is dedicated to the eternal Gods, may they forever raise us to their presence!” [via]

Journal of the Western Mystery Tradition, Vol 3 No 25

Journal of the Western Mystery Tradition, Vol 3 No 25, which is organized around the theme “Eros and Agape”, was released for the Autumnal Equinox 2013. Contents listed include:

All You Need is Love, Editorial by J. S. Kupperman
Eros, Orpheus and On the Origin of the World by Alex Rivera
Eros and Agape in Dionysius the Areopagite by J. S. Kupperman

… as well as book reviews and other sundries of interest, including the theme “The Gods” for next issue.

Journal of the Western Mystery Tradition, Vol 3 No 24

Journal of the Western Mystery Tradition, Vol 3 No 24, which is organized around the theme “Platonism”, was released today, for the Vernal Equinox 2013. Contents listed include:

To Become Like God, So Far as Possible, Editorial by J. S. Kupperman
Theurgy in Antiquity by J. Pedro Feliciano
The Gnostic Stranger in Unpanishadic Thought by Alexander Rivera
The Kybalion’s New Clothes by Nicholas E. Chapel
Interview with Michael Wilding by Teresa Burns

… as well as book reviews and other sundries of interest, including the theme “Eros and Agape” for next issue.