Tag Archives: Jeremy P Bushnell

“I’ve prepared a PowerPoint presentation that will cover the basics of what I wish to discuss with you,” Lucifer begins, opening up the ThinkPad. “Stop,” Billy says. “PowerPoint?” “It’s my preferred medium,” says Lucifer. “No,” Billy says. “Just no. You want to talk? We can talk. But I’m hungover, I’m annoyed, I’m still kind of losing my shit, I’m not watching a freaking PowerPoint presentation.” “PowerPoint is actually quite unfairly maligned,” Lucifer says.

Jeremy P Bushnell, The Weirdness: A Novel [Amazon, Bookshop, Publisher, Local Library]

Hermetic quote Bushnell The Weirdness not watching a freaking powerpoint presentation

From the very existence of these books he learned one primary truth: that everything in the world was enveloped in great skeins of mystery into which one could bravely probe but which one could never fully untangle.

Jeremy P Bushnell, The Weirdness: A Novel

Hermetic quote Bushnell Weirdness books

“No, Billy, Lucifer Morningstar is my true and given name.”

“That’s rough,” Billy says. “Hippie parents?”

“Not exactly.”

Jeremy P Bushnell, The Weirdness: A Novel

Hermetic quote Bushnell Weirdness hippie

“Commerce is weird,” Billy says. “I mean, think about it. People buy things.” “And I,” Anil says, “am buying you a drink. Put that goddamn banana away.”

Jeremy P Bushnell, The Weirdness: A Novel

The Weirdness

The librarian John Griogair Bell reviews The Weirdness by Jeremy P Bushnell.

Jeremy P Bushnell The Weirdness

The Weirdness by Jeremy P Bushnell is a terrific twisty toboggan ride of a read. Good thing the author is an instructor because this is a well-crafted writing masterclass in fun fiction.

The protagonist is jerked through a shocking, surprising character arc. There are fun plot twists that change everything. There are several bites of fine, healthy wisdom folded within this narrative confection, but also mixed with some zesty flavor grains of good surreal absurdity. Fun little nods to actual esotericism are just enough chocolate sprinkles on top, but not too much or too literal. The main antagonists have Zelazny’s Amber-level meta-capability compared to the protagonist, and yet, somehow, like Heinlein’s Job, the hero soldiers on through hell, food-service hell, even public-speaking hell, and back, and all with a tidy satisfying aftertaste beyond.