Tag Archives: John Paul

Five new items by Aleister Crowley from Vanity Fair 1916

I added five new items by Aleister Crowley from the pages of Vanity Fair in 1916. There’s a couple of articles, some written pseudonymously, and some more poetry I think hasn’t been collected anywhere before. One of the articles is a historical political piece which will probably be of interest to a variety of people; another is a kind of review of Ratan Devi’s performances in New York by Crowley, which is Crowley promoting the work of a love interest under a pseudonym; the final article is an odd little spoof piece purporting to detail the scientific management of blondes (which also includes an interesting fake comment from the Editor chidding the piece for appearing to favour the Germans). Then there’s two poems, one begins “A cigar is like a wife!” and the second “When first your raven beauty made me fond” seems to be related to the article about blondes.

You can read a bit more about Aleister Crowley, his affair with Ratan Devi, and this period of time when Crowley was in New York in Chapter 12 of Richard Kaczynski‘s Perdurabo: The Life of Aleister Crowley and also, I happened onto this today, for another perspective in “The savant and the occultist” by Richard Boyle. Of course, don’t forget that the Confessions of Aleister Crowley are online at the library.

Three Great Hoaxes of the War
Blessed Are They That Have Not Seen and Yet Have Believed
By Aleister Crowley
Vanity Fair, January, 1916, p 37,118

Anna of Havana
By Aleister Crowley
With Drawings by Reginald Birch
Vanity Fair, January, 1916, p 43

To a Brunette
Addressed to His Beloved, after a short absence
By Aleister Crowley
Sketches by Reginald Birch
Vanity Fair, February, 1916, p 63

Ratan Devi: Indian Singer
By Sri Paramahansa Tat (Aleister Crowley)
Vanity Fair, May, 1916, p 79

On the Management of Blondes
Prolegomena to Any System of Philosophy Devoted to Their Treatment and Care
By Dionysus Carr (Aleister Crowley), Professor of Eugenics in the University of Tübingen
Vanity Fair, May, 1916, p 85