Tag Archives: magic

“Is Jane magic?” Martha whispered to Katharine. “I don’t know. I think so,” Katharine whispered back. Jane glared at them. They went for two blocks in silence. “Are we magic, too?” “I don’t know. I’m scared to find out.”

Edward Eager, Half Magic

Hermetic quote Eager Magic scared

In magic—and in life—there is only the present moment, the now. You can’t measure time the way you measure the distance between two points.

Paulo Coelho, Aleph

Hermetic quote Coelho Aleph present

Young wizards are always surprised to discover that magic doesn’t solve most of their problems.

Bill Kieffer, The Goat

“I don’t like to be a witch,” said Minx, unhappily. “I’d like to be just like other children.” “But don’t you know lots of magic?” persisted Jack. “I know some,” admitted Minx, rather proudly.

Anna Elizabeth Bennett, Little Witch

The difference between Cinderella’s story and mine is that there are no happy endings here. There is no Prince Charming, no magic pumpkin coach to spirit me away, no light at the end of the tunnel. There is only me, and I am royally shafted.

Harmon Cooper, The Feedback Loop

was it just an accident, or did we want so much to be magic we got that way, somehow?

Edward Eager, Half Magic

Magic and Masculinity

Magic and Masculinity: Ritual Magic and Gender in the Early Modern Era by Frances, part of the International Library of Historical Studies series, from I B Tauris, may be of interest. Dan Harms posted a review over on his blog.

Frances Timbers Magic and Masculinity I B Tauris

“In early modern England, the practice of ritual or ceremonial magic – the attempted communication with angels and demons – both reinforced and subverted existing concepts of gender. The majority of male magicians acted from a position of control and command commensurate with their social position in a patriarchal society; other men, however, used the notion of magic to subvert gender ideals while still aiming to attain hegemony. Whilst women who claimed to perform magic were usually more submissive in their attempted dealings with the spirit world, some female practitioners employed magic to undermine the patriarchal culture and further their own agenda. Frances Timbers studies the practice of ritual magic in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries focusing especially on gender and sexual perspectives. Using the examples of well-known individuals who set themselves up as magicians (including John Dee, Simon Forman and William Lilly), as well as unpublished diaries and journals, literature and legal records, this book provides a unique analysis of early modern ceremonial magic from a gender perspective.”