Tag Archives: magicians

The Magic Order

Hermetic Library Fellow T Polyphilus reviews The Magic Order, Book One [Amazon, Bookshop, Publisher, Hoopla, Local Library] by Mark Millar, Olivier Coipel, & al., volume 1 of The Magic Order series.

Millar Coipel The Magic Order Book One

I borrowed this comics collection from the public library, having heard nothing of it previously. Apparently, the second volume has appeared in individual floppies, and the once-cancelled (during pandemic gyrations) Netflix series is back in active development. It’s ultra-violent and and not especially clever about supernatural magic or stage magic, both of which are central to the story. Thaumaturgy is hereditary, and the “Order” is a family concern.

I liked Olivier Coipel’s art very much. His compositions are dynamic, and the characters are expressive. The art benefits from the masterful colors by Dave Stewart, of course.

The book was just barely good enough that I’ll read Volume Two if I can borrow it from the library, and I’ll give the tv series a shot if it ever manifests.

More personal than any article of clothing. More private than any diary. Every page stained with a sorcerer’s hidden character, their private demons, their wildest ambitions. Some magicians produce collections, others produce only a single book, but nearly all of them produce something before they die.

Scott Lynch, In the Stacks [Amazon, Local Library]

Hermetic quote Lynch In the Stacks more personal more private sorcerers hidden character demons wildest ambitions magicians produce collections single book something before they die

It took a lot of time and I thought of quitting a few times, but I am not one to admit defeat. I steadily persevered. It is what we do, as Magicians. I meditated. I evaluated the reason behind everything I did. I refused to do that which was not in line with my new path: work for work’s sake.

Soror Beth Shemesh (Beth Kimbell), TMI or Karma Yoga: A Fool’s Journey

Hermetic quote Kimbell TMI Karma Yoga A Fool's Journey time quitting not admit defeat persevered magicians meditated evaluated reason refused not in line new path work for work's sake

Levitation

Hermetic Library Fellow T Polyphilus reviews Levitation: Physics and Psychology in the Service of Deception. A Story about Stage Magic. [Amazon, Bookshop, Publisher, Local Library] by  Jim Ottaviani and Janine Johnston.

Ottaviani Johnston Levitation

This graphic novel is the first I’ve read with an annotated bibliography. It’s a fictionalized history of a single trick of stage magic, how it was devised, and its passage through three generations of performers. Although some supporting characters are purely fictional, the three magicians and the stage technician who serves as narrator are all actual historical figures.

The technical explanations that make up much of the book are not boring, nor do they seem too digressive. The ending, factual as it evidently is, has a small and quizzical taste of tragedy to it.

So much of what magicians have taken for granted this century stems from the work of the Golden Dawn and Aleister Crowley. Much of what will constitute standard magical theory and practice in the next century will derive from the state-of-the-art ideas and techniques currently under development in Chaos Magic.

Phil Hine, Condensed Chaos: An Introduction to Chaos Magic

Hermetic quote Hine Condensed granted

LeMulgeton: Goetia and the Stellar Tradition

LeMulgeton: Goetia and the Stellar Tradition by Leo Holmes is a new release available directly from Fall of Man in physical and digital editions. There are also a number of images of the book on their social networking page and a sample chapter on the website.

Leo Holmes' Lemulgeton from Fall of Man

“Most of The Ars Goetia readers, if not all, are much more interested in what they can get or do by using it than in its origins. But how did it arrive to our days? What, or who, are the subjects in the book? Why 72 and what do their classifications mean? What can their depictions say about them? A lot of questions remain, and it is the aim of LeMulgeton: Goetia and the Stellar Tradition to point towards where some of those answers can be found.

Throughout the pages of this work, the author attempts to relate both Lemegeton and Mul.Apin (a Babylonian compendium that deals with many diverse aspects of Babylonian astronomy and astrology), attributing the Goetics to the Sumerian Constellations (which include single stars and planets) neglecting the prose’s linear flow for the sake of mythic astronomical approach. For that, the author analyzes every possibility – similarity in names, coincidental depictions, mythological attributions and even Constellations’ modern names – following the order in which the demons are presented in Lemegeton. These associations are not to be taken dogmatically though, but rather serve as a pragmatic working table to stimulate contemporary magicians to further develop knowledge and practice on these matters. Mul.Apin and Lemegeton are apophenic (and pareidolic) maps whose sole intent is to serve as a medium for keeping alive a knowledge which is probably as old as human nature. Therefore, those associations are temporary, ever revolving, just like the stars they are about.

The aim of LeMulgeton: Goetia and the Stellar Tradition is to attend a call and to re-establish a long lost connection with the Elder Gods.” [via]

Faustus the card game

Faustus is “a fiendishly tactical card game of temptation and demonology for three to six sorcerers” from Talking Skull, designed by Nimrod Jones and art by George C Contronis.

Faustus the card game from Talking Skull

Doctor Faustus made a pact with the demon, Mephistopheles, to have power over all demons and so become the most powerful magician of all time. You, too, have entered into such a pact, but can you really control what you have unleashed or will they take control of you?

Secrets are power and temptation! Battle with other magicians to ensure that you, and only you, escape the price for such power: Damnation!

Faustus is a game of secrets and temptation. In this game for 3 to 6 players, you take on the role of a magician summoning demons onto yourself and casting them at other magicians whilst tempting them with your hidden secrets. But only one can escape damnation. Only one! One goes free else all are damned!

This card game, designed by Nimrod Jones with stunningly atmospheric art by George C. Cotronis, is the flagship game for Talking Skull, due for release in October via our print partners, Chronicle City.

With two versions of the game and optional rules, this game can be played by both novice and experienced gamers. In the Basic version of the game all that matters on the demons are the numbers; keep your numbers low and doom the rest. In the Advanced game you experience the full power of the demons under your command with each of the 40 Demons offering a unique power that is yours to command while they are in bound to your Pact.

Read about the development process of this game in The Road to Faustus.” [via]

Faustus the card game preview deck