Tag Archives: Majere Pr.ODF

The R’lyeh Text

Majere, Pr.ODF reviews The R’lyeh Text by Robert Turner, introduction by Colin Wilson; in the archive of Bkwyrm’s Occult Book Reviews.

Turner The R'lyeh Text

Another contributor has something to say about The R’lyeh Text:

This volume is a supplement to George Hays’ “Necronomicon: The Book Of Dead Names”, and is basically more of the same. Again, ignore the spurious “fragments” of garbage purporting to be pages from the Necronomicon and read the essays instead. If anything, they are even better than those in the previous volume – dealing with subjects incl. the Egyptian mysteries, Atlantis, creation myths, Lovecraft’s literary inspirations, and the tenuous Crowley-Lovecraft connection. Still, it’s certainly not to everyone’s tastes but as trash, it’s quite readable.

The New Satanists

The New Satanists by Linda Blood, reviewed by Majere, Pr.ODF, in the archive of Bkwyrm’s Occult Reviews.

Blood The New Satanists

This load of utter drivel was penned by a former member of the Temple of Set (and allegedly a “lover” of its founder, Michael Aquino). Basically, it is a propaganda piece full of the typical sour grapes backlash one would normally expect from someone who leaves their group on bad terms. It dredges up all sorts of inane conspiracy theories regarding modern Satanism, and also tries to drag Michael Aquino through the mud with a considerably sizable chunk of the book devoted to accusations leveled against him over an alleged paedophilia case in the eighties. Aquino apparently responded by suing the author for slander. But regardless if you like or hate Aquino- the rest of the book is a load of hysterical, cliched nonsense, and, as one might quite reasonably wonder: if Satanism is so utterly evil and repulsive as Blood claims, then why was she so immersed in it in the first place? As anyone in genuine Satanism knows – no-one is ever forced to join. This book isn’t even worth using as a doorstop.

The Devil’s Notebook

Majere, Pr. ODF, reviews The Devil’s Notebook by Anton Szandor LaVey in the Bkywrm archive.

LaVey The Devil's Notebook

The fourth volume of LaVey’s writings is apparently a collection of articles penned by him over twenty years, covering a wide variety of topics from “Goodguy Badges” through to “Toilet Seat Meditation”. The majority of the material is not as “esoteric” as his other writings (ie. “Satanic Bible”, “Satanic Rituals”, & “Satanic Witch”), but presented more in a humourous fashion, with LaVey’s usual brand of cynicism and wit. Some might groan at the (again repeated) sections dealing with LaVey’s personal “android” fetish and the now-cliched “Five-Point Pentagonal Revisionism”, but otherwise the book is a worthwhile read if only because LaVey does have a keen and logical perception of the world, regardless of whether you like his Satanism or not. To be honest, if you totally ignored the Satanic references, you’d still be left a rather interesting and readable book.

You can find this book at Amazon, Abebooks, and Powell’s.

The Black Book of Satan

Majere, Pr.ODF, reviews The Black Book of Satan by Christos Beest in the Bkwyrm archive.

This is one of the primary texts of Britain’s notorious Order of Nine Angles – perhaps the largest exponent of Satanism outside of the American/LaVeyan sphere of influence. The Black Book is a collection of Sinister rituals, ranging from initiation rites to the infamous Black Mass, including commentaries given on the nature of Black Magick and it’s applications. Although not for all tastes, and certainly controversial in some respects, it is perhaps one of the best alternatives available to the late Anton LaVey’s “Satanic Bible”. Not available for general retail – available by mail order only.

You can find this book at Amazon, Abebooks, and Powell’s

Raising Hell

Majere, Pr.ODF reviews Raising Hell: An A-Z of the Occult/Satanic Underworld by Michael Newton in the Bkwyrm archive.

Yet another by-the-numbers effort (or lack of such) that attempts to provide an all-round view of Satanism and alleged crimes committed in the name thereof. The content of this book is sadly lacking – much of the data long outdated, and it seems that the author has just thrown in any old thing into it that bears even the most tenuous link to “Satanism” or the “Occult” (eg. the Ku Klux Klan were neither!). This 400+ page volume has no practical value for anyone wishing to learn anything of significance about either Satanism or the occult – rather it is a collection of jumbled entries evidently trying to focus mainly on the more “shocking” elements of juvenile devil-worship and neo-pagan or esoteric societies (much of it inaccurate). Serious readers should avoid this turkey like the plague.

Find this book at Amazon, Abebooks, and Powell’s.