Tag Archives: manuscripts

Inner Order Teachings of the Golden Dawn

Inner Order Teachings of the Golden Dawn by Pat Zalewski, with an introduction by Nick Farrell, the 2006 softcover from Thoth Publications, is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

Pat Zalewski Nick Farrell Inner Order Teachings of the Golden Dawn from Thoth Publications

“Hidden Teachings revealed!

For more than 100 years, secret magical manuscripts from the Order of the Golden Dawn’s inner order of adepts (the Ordo Rosae Rubae et Aurae Crucis) have been unseen by most students of the esoteric. This includes the Golden Dawn alchemical teachings, secret teachings of the Zelator Grade and the important Caduceus paper. These have either been gathering dust on some collector’s shelves, or have been worked by those who have continued the Order’s work. So secret were these documents, Israel Regardie was unaware of them and subsequently many of the modern orders of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn who were dependent on his encyclopaedic text The Golden Dawn for their teachings have left out much of this work. However, the papers contained in this book provide the much needed keys to understand the Golden Dawn system in its entirety.

Just as the Golden Dawn was not simply dependent upon intellectual information gathered under one heading but also on oral instruction to make the system come alive, so this material came with extensive traditions that make it useful to the student.

For the first time, Golden Dawn authority Pat Zalewski, who was trained by the inner order adepts of the GOlden Dawn, reveals the key to this material.”

 

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Introduction to “Gnosticism”

Introduction to “Gnosticism”: Ancient Voices, Christian Worlds by Nicola Denzey Lewis, from Oxford University Press, may be of interest. There’s an interesting review of the work over at Peje Iesous at “Nicola Denzey Lewis’ Textbook On the Gnostic Literature Is Really Useful (Or: Why I’m Glad My Class Failed Before It Got Off the Ground)” [HT Jared Calaway] which may also interest you, especially since it highlights this book’s apparently good exploration of the way the term “Gnosticism” can be problematic. The review seems to suggest this is a new work for 2013, but I notice that Amazon has 2012 as the publication date; but, it is at least recent for some reasonably flexible value of recent either way.

Nicola Denzey Lewis Introduction to "Gnosticism" from Oxford University Press

“Discovered in Egypt in 1945, the fascinating and challenging Nag Hammadi writings forever changed our understanding of early Christianity. State-of-the-art and the only volume of its kind, Introduction to “Gnosticism”: Ancient Voices, Christian Worlds guides students through the most significant of the Nag Hammadi texts. Employing an exceptionally lucid and accessible writing style, Nicola Denzey Lewis groups the texts by theme and genre, places them in the broader context of the ancient world, and reveals their most inscrutable mysteries.

Ideal for use in courses in Early Christianity/Origins of Christianity, Christianity to 1500, Gnostic Gospels, Gnosticism, Early Christian Writings, Orthodoxy and Heresy, and New Testament Studies, Introduction to ‘Gnosticism’ is enhanced by numerous pedagogical features, including images of the manuscripts, study and discussion questions, annotated bibliographies, tables, diagrams, and a glossary.” [via]

Vinculum Confusium

Hermetic Library fellow Colin Campbell has a new post about conjurations of Goetia over on his blog at “Vinculum Confusium“.

“So, here I am on another goose chase. … three manuscripts, listed in sequence, would seem to form the core of what has now become Goetia, but it’s not sure what’s become of them, nor can I say with certainty that they were actually what became Goetia.” [via]

More on the Copiale cipher and the revealed rites of a secret society of Oculists

I’d posted previously about the success made cracking the Copiale cipher, and that the text revealed the ritual of a previously lost German secret order called the Great Enlightened Society of Oculists, at “The Book of Law of the Venerable Secret Order of the Eye“. Today I noticed that over on Danger Room, there’s a nice long-form piece by Noah Shachtman about this that offers quite a bit of narrative and more information at “They Cracked This 250 Year-Old Code, And Found a Secret Society Inside“. There’s also images of several items used by the society to gander at there as well, such as a blindfold with lenses and more, including the personal narrative by Shachtman of traveling to see the trove of materials first hand.

“The master wears an amulet with a blue eye in the center. Before him, a candidate kneels in the candlelit room, surrounded by microscopes and surgical implements. The year is roughly 1746. The initiation has begun.

The master places a piece of paper in front of the candidate and orders him to put on a pair of eyeglasses. “Read,” the master commands. The candidate squints, but it’s an impossible task. The page is blank.

The candidate is told not to panic; there is hope for his vision to improve. The master wipes the candidate’s eyes with a cloth and orders preparation for the surgery to commence. He selects a pair of tweezers from the table. The other members in attendance raise their candles.

The master starts plucking hairs from the candidate’s eyebrow. This is a ritualistic procedure; no flesh is cut. But these are “symbolic actions out of which none are without meaning,” the master assures the candidate. The candidate places his hand on the master’s amulet. Try reading again, the master says, replacing the first page with another. This page is filled with handwritten text. Congratulations, brother, the members say. Now you can see.” [via]

“It was the fall of 1998, and Schaefer was about to leave Berlin to take a job in the linguistics department at Uppsala University, north of Stockholm. Hock announced that he had a going-away present for Schaefer.

She was a little surprised—a parting gift seemed an oddly personal gesture for such a reserved colleague. Still more surprising was the present itself: a large brown paper envelope marked with the words top secret and a series of strange symbols.

Schaefer opened it. Inside was a note that read, “Something for those long Swedish winter nights.” It was paper-clipped to 100 or so photocopied pages filled with a handwritten script that made no sense to her whatsoever:

Arrows, shapes, and runes. Mathematical symbols and Roman letters, alternately accented and unadorned. Clearly it was some kind of cipher. Schaefer pelted Hock with questions about the manuscript’s contents. Hock deflected her with laughter, mentioning only that the original text might be Albanian. Other than that, Hock said, she’d have to find her own answers.” [via]

The Book of Law of the Venerable Secret Order of the Eye

I noticed a post over at Slashdot, “Copiale Cipher Decoded“, about how the breaking of the Copiale Cipher has revealed the previously coded instruction documents for the ritual of an 18th century secret order “that apparently had a fascination with eye surgery and ophthalmology.” Of course, for those interested in such things as secret orders, order with secrets and the Golden Dawn cipher manuscripts, this should be interesting stuff indeed.

“during the ceremony he should not think further about the shells but the core even at the end those symbolic actions out of which none are without meaning”

You can read the english translation of the decoded German original on the research site. There’s also an article over at the New York Times, “How Revolutionary Tools Cracked a 1700s Code“.