Tag Archives: max ernst

Art and Alchemy at Museum Kunstpalast in Düsseldorf through Aug 10th, 2014

Art and Alchemy: The Mystery of Transformation is an exhibit at Museum Kunstpalast in Düsseldorf through Aug 10th, 2014 that may be of interest [British Library]. The exhibit includes four ‘Ripley Scrolls’ from the British Library, which four are also available as Digitised Manuscripts and which you can read about on the British Library blog, if you can’t make it to see them in person.

British Library Ripley Scroll Add MS 5025 detail
Detail of a hermetic illustrating stages in the alchemical process and the revelation of alchemical wisdom, Add MS 5025, f. 4r.

“For the first time in Germany, an exhibition spanning all epochs and genres will be introducing the exciting link between art and alchemy in past and present times. 250 works from antiquity to the present, encompassing Baroque art, Surrealism, through to contemporary art from collections and museums in the USA, Great Britain, France, Mexico and Israel reveal the fascination which alchemy exerted for many visual artists. Artists featured in the exhibition, such as Joseph Beuys, Jan Brueghel the Elder, Lucas Cranach the Elder, Max Ernst, Hendrick Goltzius, Rebecca Horn, Anish Kapoor, Yves Klein, Sigmar Polke, Rembrandt van Rijn, Peter Paul Rubens and David Teniers the Younger invite visitors to explore the mystery of transformation.

Alchemy was invariably practised in secret, but was by no means a rare occurrence until well into the 18th century: Eminent personalities, including Paracelsus, Isaac Newton and Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, were alchemists, too. It was not until the Age of the Enlightenment that alchemy was ousted and became intermingled with occultism, sorcery and superstition. In connection with 19th and early 20th-century psychoanalysis alchemy was brought to new life.

The exhibition was conceived by Museum Kunstpalast in cooperation with the research group ‘Art and Knowledge in Pre-Modern Europe’ at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin, as well as a group of experts at the Chemical Heritage Foundation in Philadelphia, which also provided many pieces on loan. A Wunderkammer of curious and exotic treasures from flora and fauna is offered for visitors to explore. In an extensive accompanying programme the subject of art and alchemy will be expanded upon by means of lectures, talks and guided tours. For the exhibition, a studio for children was set up, where the theme of ‘The Alchemy of Colour’ is explored by taking a close look at colours, along with their archetypical elements and production.”

Surrealist Painting 1919-1939

Hermetic Library fellow T Polyphilus reviews Surrealist Painting 1919-1939 by Jose Pierre:

Jose Pierre's Surrealist Painting 1919-1939

 

This tiny softcover book has eleven unnumbered pages of text, illustrated by fifteen plates; or fifteen plates contextualized by a brief essay, depending on how you look at it. The page size is roughly that of a postcard, and the plates are in full color.

Pierre’s essay provides a thumbnail history of Surrealism before 1940, with emphasis on painting. He is no fan of Salvador Dali, despite the inclusion of two Dali paintings among the plates. He does extol the work of Rene Magritte, who also rates the inclusion of two paintings. The other artists so highlighted are Giorgio de Chirico and Max Ernst.

The book is an admirably efficient overview of its topic. [via]

 

 

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