Tag Archives: Nicolas Hays

Beginner’s Guide to Revelation

Beginner’s Guide to Revelation: A Jungian Interpretation by Robin Robertson, from Nicolas-Hays, distrubuted by Samuel Weiser, is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

Robin Robertson Beginner's Guide to Revelation

“For eighteen hundred years, the prophecies contained in the Book of Revelation have captured the collective Western imagination. In Beginner’s Guide to Revelation, Robin Robertson uses his unique skills as a Jungian-oriented therapist to reinterpret this magnificent document as a saga of changing human consciousness. Robertson follows a spiral path around the central issues of our times, drawing from Jung’s psychology, neurophysiology, shamanic rituals, and modern mathematics. The author reveals how the Book of Revelation expresses in symbolic language our collective ability to experience within us the spiritual depths of the universe. This exciting new material from the author of Beginner’s Guide to Jungian Psychology offers a sensitive journey into the meaning of death, transformation, and changing consciousness.” — back cover

Blake, Jung, and the Collective Unconscious

Blake, Jung, and the Collective Unconscious: The Conflict Between Reason and Imagination by June Singer, introduced by M Esther Harding part of the Jung on the Hudson book series, a 2000 paperback from Nicholas-Hays, is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

Amusingly, I also have a previous version of this same book, which I purchased on a separate occasion, but that has a different, more provocative, title and from another publisher: The Unholy Bible: Blake, Jung, and the Collective Unconscious by June Singer, introduced by M Esther Harding, a 1986 paperback from Sigo Press, is also part of the collection at the Reading Room.

June Singer M Esther Harding Blake, Jung and the Collective Unconscious from Nicolas-Hays

“More than ever, the time is ripe for June Singer’s penetrating commentary on William Blake’s work. The Marriage of Heaven and Hell. For even the most devout literary scholars and art historians, much of Blake’s mystical visions and writing are perplexing. With his pen and brush, he gave birth to mythological figures and fantastic metaphors. Singer shows us that Blake was actually tapping into the collective unconscious and giving form and voice to primordial psychological energies, or archetypes, that he experienced in his inner and outer world. Blake’s writing and art was his personal dialogue between God and his own inner self—a reconciliation of duality—in which we can find clues to contemporary issues.

In the 18th century, Blake was a pioneer in finding, nurturing, and celebrating his personal connection with the divine, a search that still appeals to people who are coming to terms with the contemporary struggle between science and spirituality—the conflict between reality and imagination. With clarity and wisdom, Singer examines the images and words in each plate of Blake’s work, applying in her analysis the concepts that C. G. Jung advanced in his psychological theories. There is no more perfect lens with which to look at Blake’s work than that of Jung’s concept of the archetypes, the process of individuation, and the mysterium coniunctionis, in which consciousness and the unconscious are united.

This edition includes a new preface by Jung [sic!] Springer and a reproduction of 24 pages from Blake’s The Marriage of Heaven and Hell.” — back cover


 

June Singer M Esther Harding The Unholy Bible from Sigo Press