Tag Archives: occult

Some believe any and every thing is symbolic, and can be transcribed, and explain the occult, but of what they do not know. (Great spiritual truths?) So argument a metaphor, cautiously confusing the obvious which developes the hidden virtue. This unnecessary corpulency, however impressive, is it not disgusting? (The Elephant is exceeding large but extremely powerful, the swine though odious does not breed the contempt of our good taste.) If a man is no hero to his servant, much less can he remain a mystic in the eyes of the curious; similarity educates mimicry. Decorate your meaning, however objectionable (as fact), after you have shown your honesty. Truth, though simple, never needs the argument of confusion for obscurity; its own pure symbolism embraces all possibilities as mystic design. Take your stand in commonsense and you include the truth which cannot lie; no argument has yet prevailed. Perfect proportion suggest no alteration, and what is useless decays.

Austin Osman Spare, The Book of Pleasure

Hermetic quote Spare The Book of Pleasure take stand commonsense truth cannot lie no argument repvailed perfect proportion no alteration useless decays

In being given the formal symbolic secrets the Candidate should reflect that he is receiving a first lesson in a long course of instruction of a private and occult nature; i.e., one not taught outside the Lodge, but hidden from public knowledge and intended to help him upon the path of his personal inner life. For having but just entered upon that path, it is proper that he should now be instructed how to tread it.

W L Wilmshurst, The Ceremony of Initiation, Part II

Hermetic quote Wilmshurst The Ceremony of Initiation formal symbolic secrets first lesson long course instruction private occult hidden public knowledge path personal inner life proper instructed

Lo! were it otherwise, mere banishment,
I deem he had feared more! He had an heir.
This was a boy of strength with ardour blent,
High hope embowered in a body fair.
Him had he watched with eager eye, aware
Of misery occult in youth, awake
At the first touch of the diviner air
Of manhood, that could bane and blessing make,
The Lord of Life and Death, the secret of the Snake.

Aleister Crowley, Why Jesus Wept

Hermetic quote Crowley Why Jesus Wept banishment feared boy strength ardour blent misery occult youth awake life death secret snake

Hermetic Library Zine July 2021

Introducing Hermetic Library Zine, Perihelion, July 2021, Issue #4, a publication of Hermetic Library.

Hermetic Library Zine July 2021

Each zine is a wild and wooly whatever of occultura and esoterrata compiled together, generally related to Hermetic Library’s overall mission of archiving, engaging and encouraging the living Esoteric Tradition, Hermeticism, and Aleister Crowley’s Thelema.

Contents of this issue are:

Richárd Lukács—Babalon #2, Aiden Reese—O Chaos O God, Richárd Lukács—Esbat #1, David Raffin—Switzerland is nice, as they say in Switzerland, Maevius Lynn—Demiurge, Jonathan Korman—Esoteric Cultural Appropriation, Frank Ra—The Renaissance Mantegna Tarot: History Meets Applied Psychology, Johana Reuter—Ritual Beads: Gate-Key to Magick, John Griogair Bell—Caption Contest, John Griogair Bell—Advancement is no guarantee of attainment, John Griogair Bell—Meme, John Griogair Bell—The shocking truth about magic talking cats, Richárd Lukács—Babalon #1

Follow news and announcements for Hermetic Library Zine on the library blog, and get in touch with the Librarian to submit your content for the next issue!

I would especially like to take a moment to thank each and every Patron for helping to make this new zine and the work of the library possible.

Hermetic Library Zine January 2021

Introducing Hermetic Library Zine, Perihelion, January 2021, Issue #3, a publication of Hermetic Library.

Hermetic Library Zine January 2021

Each zine is a wild and wooly whatever of occultura and esoterrata compiled together, generally related to Hermetic Library’s overall mission of archiving, engaging and encouraging the living Esoteric Tradition, Hermeticism, and Aleister Crowley’s Thelema.

Contents of this issue are:

Gordon Scott—Cover, Will Merchant — Poetry, Esteban Garcia — Rosicrucian Fractal, D S Reif — Julius Evola: Heterodyne Apotheosis, John Griogair Bell — Meme, Brad Wilson — Essays, Billy Mavreas — A / Apex / Alpha, Robert Mitchell — A Deeper Understanding of X: Wheel of Fortune, Esteban Garcia — Hermetic Color, Ian Glynn Perkins — Transitioning, John Griogair Bell — Memes, Ian Glynn Perkins — Love Feast, John Griogair Bell — Meme, Gabriel Prado — Polemic 1: poem aphorism spear, John Griogair Bell — Meme, Frater Revelo Relevo — Heart Alignment, John Griogair Bell — Wrong Answers Only, John Griogair Bell — Meme, John Griogair Bell — Replace a letter, ruin Liber Al vel Legis, Louis Agrican — De Nominibus Rectis Stellarum, or On the Proper Names of the Stars

Follow news and announcements for Hermetic Library Zine on the library blog, and get in touch with the Librarian to submit your content for the next issue!

I would especially like to take a moment to thank each and every Patron for helping to make this new zine and the work of the library possible.

Odd Jobs: so called not because they were varied or petty but because they could only be collectively described as odd; Missions into a world of mysticism, the occult and sometimes even the horrific and nightmarish. A world beyond a war, beyond man and his understanding.

Nikolai Bird, Cthulhu – Something in the Mud

Hermetic quote Bird Cthulhu jobs

Truly occult and Theosophical books ought to be prayers and poems; calculated to lift the heart and the mind of the reader up to the highest regions of thought, and aiding him to descend into the innermost sanctuary of his own being

Franz Hartmann, In The Pronaos of The Temple of Wisdom

Surrealism and the Occult

Surrealism and the Occult: Occultism and Western Esotericism in the Work and Movement of André Breton by Tessel M Bauduin, due in December from Amsterdam University Press, may be of interest.

Tessel M Bauduin Surrealism and the Occult from Amsterdam University Press

“This book offers a new perspective on a long-debated issue: the role of the occult in surrealism, in particular under the leadership of French writer André Breton. Based on thorough source analysis, this study details how our understanding of occultism and esotericism, as well as of their function in Bretonian surrealism, changed significantly over time from the early 1920s to the late 1950s.”