Tag Archives: pagan witchcraft

Events at Treadwell’s Books for October, 2013

Here is a selection from the upcoming events at Treadwell’s Books in London for October, 2013, which may be of interest.

Treadwell's Books in London

 

The Lairs of Cthulhu II: The Hollywood Years
30 September 2013 (Monday)
Dr James Holloway

Treadwell's Books in London - The Lairs of Cthulhu II

Tonight archaeologist and Cthulhu buff James Holloway explores archaeological concepts found in Lovecraft’s mythos, turning to look at how these concepts of land, history and the past are reformulated in Lovecraftian-based films which have come out in the decades after the author’s death. A riveting and intelligent speaker whose ideas always invite new questioning, this lecture is a sequel to his now-famed 2009 Treadwell’s Lecture. Dr James Holloway studied archaeology at Cambridge University, where he received his doctorate, and returns to Treadwell’s with a warm welcome.

Price: £7
Time: 7.15pm for a 7.30pm start

 

Hocus Pocus: Witches in Film
9 October 2013 (Wednesday)
Judith Noble

Judith Noble- Hocus Pocus at Treadwell's Books

Judith Noble is a noted film scholar and expert in Western occultism, and tonight she examines critically the portrayal of witchcraft in feature film. Bringing together expertise in the subjects of modern pagan witchcraft, Western esotericism, popular culture and film-making, she offers new insights and raises new questions. A former producer who now lectures at University of the Arts in Bournemouth, she is a gifted speaker who returns to Treadwell’s at our invitation. It’s a lively, illustrated lecture for everyone.

Price: £7
Time: 6.45 for 7pm start

 

Alchemy: Symbols of the Rubedo
24 October 2013 (Thursday)
Paul Cowlan

Paul Cowlan Alchemy at Treadwell's Books

Alchemist Paul Cowlan lectures on the symbolism of each of the famed phases of the Work, the alchemical process of perfection. Tonight he unlocks the Rubedo, the final reddening stage, the Rising Dawn, the attainment of the Philosophers’ Stone. We learn what it looks like, how it can be ‘multiplied’, what its powers are, and what its dangers. We will also meet some of those who claim to have made or used the Stone, and will glance at both ancient and contemporary evidence for the reality of the Lapis. Suitable for everyone, this illustrated lecture will rock your world. Paul Cowlan has been practising spiritual alchemy for over twenty years, and is a popular speaker visiting from Germany.

Price: £7
Time: 7.15pm for a 7.30pm start

 

On Liber Nigri Solis
26 October 2013 (Saturday)

On Liber Nigri Solis at Treadwell's Books

An Afternoon Event
This modern astrychymical grimoire was published anonymously in 2004: an instant sensation. Theion Press’s new expanded version prompts a day exploring and unpacking it. Dr Eva Kingsepp from Stockholm University speaks on the history of the Black Sun symbol, from alchemy to Romanticism to German Naturphilosophie — to modern right-wing misappropriations. Andrew Vee, an author of the LNS, gives the second lecture, on gnosis of our solar system Black Suns and relevant fictive points, with the book’s applied workings and sigils. The event concludes with a “rite inscendence on a contra-solar journey starting from Casimi and finishing at piercing the Apex.” Drinks follow. Theion’s David Beth will be with us on the day.

Price: £15
Time: 1.45 for 2pm start, runs till 5.30

Triumph of the Moon

Hermetic Library fellow T Polyphilus reviews The Triumph of the Moon: A History of Modern Pagan Witchcraft by Ronald Hutton:

Ronald Hutton's Triumph of the Moon via Oxford University Press

 

Ronald Hutton’s history of 20th century Witchcraft and Wicca is a comprehensive and compelling examination of the subject. No other book to date gives such a clear and entertaining view of the origins and development of religious Witchcraft in the modern world. Hutton clearly has substantial sympathy for his subjects, and he is respectful to both living and dead practitioners, but he does not settle for unsubstantiated claims, and he deftly dispels a number of myths and long-standing controversies.

The book is divided into two sections, and the first section is a set of interlinked historical essays that describe various movements, ideas, and institutions that served as contributory streams to religious Witchcraft. These contributors include Romantic literary paganism, the Frazerian and ritualist schools of anthropology, folklorism, Freemasonry, ceremonial magic, Thelema, and Woodcraft Chivalry, among others. In the second section, Hutton provides a full narrative of the emergence and evolution of modern British Witchcraft, beginning with Gerald Gardner, and addressing all the major leaders, groups, “traditions,” and schools. The unique mutations of the Craft in North America are addressed only to the extent that their influence migrated back to England. (Jack Parsons’ abortive Witchcraft thus passes without notice.) Hutton also traces the reactions of the press, politics, popular culture, and the academy to the increasing presence and visibility of Witchcraft.

In light of Aleister Crowley’s published disdain for “witches,” it is ironic that so many British Wiccan luminaries claimed to have had instruction from the Beast. Hutton carefully checks these allegations against Crowley’s own exhaustive diaries; Gardner is the only one who seems to have had a genuine claim in that department.

Hutton calls Wicca “the only religion England has ever given the world.” I don’t know that I would agree with him, since despite the prudent claims of Freemasonry to be “religious, not a religion,” it probably qualifies as well, from a scholar’s perspective. In fact, Hutton’s grasp of Masonry leaves a little bit to be desired; as for instance when he calls the Royal Arch “the highest, most exclusive and most prestigious of all Masonic degrees.” (p. 219) Where it counts in relation to his central topic, however, Hutton delivers the goods, instancing such items as this Fellow Craft ritual closing circa 1800:

“Happy have we met, Happy have we been,
“Happy may we part, And happy meet again!” (p. 56)

I find it hard to imagine how any present-day Witch can afford to be without the information in this book. Anyone with any experience of Wicca should be fascinated by it, and anyone interested in contemporary religion will be enriched by it. After having read it cover-to-cover, I continue to take my copy off the shelf for purposes of reference and research. [via]

 

 

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