Tag Archives: pope gregory i

Re-discovering Mary Magdalene

Re-discovering Mary Magdalene is a DVD, still available from Star Wisdom Store, produced and narrated by Lila Sophia and David Tresemer, from 2005, which is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

David Tresemer Lila Sophia Re-discovering Mary Magdalene

I picked this up as part of my personal research, and for a short-lived study group I helped organize, on the topic of Magdalene as a suggested theme for BC Witchcamp, back in ’08.

“Who was Mary Magdalene? In 600 AD, Pope Gregory labeled her a penitent prostitute. Yet there are no direct reference in the Bible to confirm this label—none! The Christian Gospels do tell us, however, that she was permitted to perform the anointing of Jesus Christ, a task traditionally reserved for the senior priestess in the Isis tradition. Who is this mysterious woman and how do we find her?

This film incorporates excerpts from the theatrical production ‘My Magdalene,’ along with research on the making of that play, including visits to sacred sites in Europe and the Middle East. The community brought together to produce the play becomes a Mary Magdalene community. Take a journey of Remembrance to the roots of the Sacred Feminine in western culture.” — back cover

An Historical Summary of Angelic Hierarchies from Part VII: The “Seven” Thrones in In Operibus Sigillo Dei Aemeth by David Richard Jones.

“In the first section below and the text following it, not given but to which the careful reader is referred, the hierarchy is fairly strictly that of Saint Gregory and Denis. In the second section here we have a threefold division according to the lower planetary spheres, exactly along the lines given in the passage describing the principle hierarchies of the Sigillum, that is Thrones, Archangels (or as demonstrated above Trumpets) and Angels. And in the final section we see that Thrones are assigned to the motions of the heavenly spheres. This is the function they seem to have in the overall structure of the Sigillum and which clearly relates to the magical theories of Dee’s own Propeadeumata Aphoristica.” [via]

An Historical Summary of Angelic Hierarchies from Part VII: The “Seven” Thrones in In Operibus Sigillo Dei Aemeth by David Richard Jones.

“Gregory differs slightly from the Dionysian order which, because St. Denis was believed to have priority, caused late medieval theologians some distress and confusion. In fact both hypotheses are roughly contemporary, demonstrating a more general theological interest in the subject in the middle and later half of the 6th C. C.E.” [via]

An Historical Summary of Angelic Hierarchies from Part VII: The “Seven” Thrones in In Operibus Sigillo Dei Aemeth by David Richard Jones.

“These days, which abide in the interior light, may be taken for the angelic spirits, and the months, for their orders and dignities. For every single spirit, in that he shines, is a ‘day,’ but as they are distinguished by certain set dignities, so that there are some that are Thrones, some Dominions, some Principalities, and some Powers, according to this distribution of ranks, they are entitled ‘months.’

Moralia I:I:iv — Pope St. Gregory I” [via]

An Historical Summary of Angelic Hierarchies from Part VII: The “Seven” Thrones in In Operibus Sigillo Dei Aemeth by David Richard Jones.

“A similar, though less elaborate nine-fold celestial hierarchy was proposed by Pope Gregory I in his Gospel Homilies and in his Moralia on Job by collecting the Old Testament and Pauline references to angelic orders and arranging them by logical inference.

We speak of nine orders of Angels, because we know, by the testimony of Holy Scripture, that there are the following: Angels, Archangels, Virtues, Powers, Principalities, Dominations, Thrones, Cherumbim and Seraphim. Nearly every page of Scripture is witness to the fact that there are Angels and Archangels. The prophetic books, as has been noted often, speak of Cherubim and Seraphim. Four more orders are enumerated by Paul the Apostle, writing to the Ephesians, when he says, ‘Above every Principality and Power and Virtue and Domination.’ And again writing to the Colossians, he says, ‘Whether Thrones, or Powers, or Principalities, or Dominations.’ When, then, we add the Thrones to those he mentions to the Ephesians, there are five orders, to which are to be added Angels, Archangels, Cherubim and Seraphim, certainly making nine orders of Angels in all.

Homily XXIV — Pope St. Gregory I” [via]