Tag Archives: Revolution

Intervention

 

“Video for Arcade Fire’s ‘Intervention’ cut to Sergei Eisensteins iconic 1925 film, Battleship Potemkin

 

“I can taste your fear
It’s gonna lift you up and take you out of here
And the bone shall never heal
I care not if you kneel

We can’t find you now
But they’re gonna get the money back somehow
And when you finally disappear
We’ll just say you were never here

Working for the church while your life falls apart
Singing hallelujah with the fear in your heart
Every spark of friendship and love will die without a home
Hear the solider groan, ‘We’ll go at it alone’
Hear the solider groan, ‘We’ll go at it alone'”

No Light, No Light

 

No Light, No Light
” from “Ceremonials” by Florence + The Machine

 

“You are the hole in my head
You are the space in my bed
You are the silence in between
What I thought and what I said

You are the night-time fear
You are the morning when it’s clear
When it’s over your start

You’re my head
You’re my heart

No light, no light in your bright blue eyes
I never knew daylight could be so violent
A revelation in the light of day

You can choose what stays and what fades away
And I’d do anything to make you stay

No light, no light
No light

Tell me what you want me to say
Through the crowded islands
Crying out at me
In your place there were a thousand other faces

I will disappear in plain sight
Heaven help me
I need to make it right
You are the revelation
You are to get it right
And it’s a conversation
I just can’t have tonight

You want a revelation
Some kind of revolution
You are the revelation”

Robert Anton Wilson & Genesis P Orridge on Infinity Factory

 

Robert Anton Wilson & Genesis P Orridge on Infinity Factory interviewed by Richard Metzger

 

“When they say they won’t negotiate with terrorists, that means rich people won’t negotiate with poor people.”

 

“And that will happen in this country too. They’ll have to negotiate with the poor people eventually. Although this will be the last country in the world, probably.”

 

“There’s going to be a response. I don’t want to say revolution, because I don’t know what form it will take. But, there will be a response.”

Occupy Wall St – The Revolution Is Love

 

“I think love is the felt experience of connection to another being. An economist says ‘more for you is less for me.’ But the lover knows that more of you is more for me too. If you love somebody their happiness is your happiness. Their pain is your pain. Your sense of self expands to include other beings.

That’s love, love is the expansion of the self to include the other. And that’s a different kind of revolution. There’s no one to fight. There’s no evil to fight. There’s no other in this revolution.

Everybody has a unique calling and it’s really time to listen to that. That’s what the future is going to be. It’s time to get ready for it, and contribute to it, and help make it happen.”

The Situationists and the Occupation Movements

Ken Knabb has posted a new essay “The Situationists and the Occupation Movements” over at The Bureau of Public Secrets. If you’ve been following my posts about the attention that the Hakim Bey and Ontological Anarchy section and specifically T. A. Z.: The Temporary Autonomous Zone, Ontological Anarchy, Poetic Terrorism have been getting, this is an essay that may also be of interest. In a previous post, I pointed out that the Situationists should also be considered as a resource and an inspiration for the Occupy movement, not just, to extend that a bit, for Parkour and Dark City; and, here’s a great essay that speaks to that very connection.

“One of the most notable characteristics of the “Occupy” movement is that it is just what it claims to be: leaderless and antihierarchical. Certain people have of course played significant roles in laying the groundwork for Occupy Wall Street and the other occupations, and others may have ended up playing significant roles in dealing with various tasks in committees or in coming up with ideas that are good enough to be adopted by the assemblies. But as far as I can tell, none of these people have claimed that such slightly disproportionate contributions mean that they should have any greater say than anyone else. Certain famous people have rallied to the movement and some of them have been invited to speak to the assemblies, but they have generally been quite aware that the participants are in charge and that nobody is telling them what to do.

This puts the media in an awkward and unaccustomed position. They are used to relating with leaders. Since they have not been able to find any, they are forced to look a little deeper, to investigate for themselves and see if they can discover who or what may be behind all this. Since the initial concept and publicity for Occupy Wall Street came from the Canadian group and magazine Adbusters, the following passage from an interview with Adbusters editor and co-founder Kalle Lasn (Salon.com, October 4) has been widely noticed:

We are not just inspired by what happened in the Arab Spring recently, we are students of the Situationist movement. Those are the people who gave birth to what many people think was the first global revolution back in 1968 when some uprisings in Paris suddenly inspired uprisings all over the world. All of a sudden universities and cities were exploding. This was done by a small group of people, the Situationists, who were like the philosophical backbone of the movement. One of the key guys was Guy Debord, who wrote The Society of the Spectacle. The idea is that if you have a very powerful meme — a very powerful idea — and the moment is ripe, then that is enough to ignite a revolution. This is the background that we come out of.

Lasn’s description is a rather over-simplified version of what the situationists were about, but the Adbusters at least have the merit of adopting or adapting some of the situationist methods for active subversive use (which is of course what those methods were designed for), in contrast to those who relate to the situationists as passive spectators.”

I encourage you to check out the rest of that essay.

Revelation or Revolution: Ben Franklin, Prometheus Unbound by Beth Kimbell

“He returned home and ultimately became a revolutionary, not out of a desire for chaos or rebellion, but to secure Liberty for the citizens of a brave new land.” [via]

New post at Aleister Crowley 2012 quotes from and links to Magick Without Tears — Chapter LXXV

New post at Aleister Crowley 2012 at “How will you vote?” quotes from and links to Magick Without Tears – ChapterLXXV: The A∴A∴ and the Planet:

“So, whichever way you vote, you are asking for trouble, or would do, if the vote had any meaning. The result of any election, or for the matter of that any revolution, is an almost wholly insignificant component of those stupendous and inscrutable Magical Forces which determine the destinies of the planet.” [via]