Tag Archives: Sin

Yet Time To Turn in White Stains by Aleister Crowley.

“She loved me then; she loves me now, afar.
Ah, she knew not! and I, so steeped and stained
With fierce sins, knew myself unworthy of
The heart I gained,
And, a lost mariner whose polar star
He is ashamed to look to, cast away her love.” [via]

The queen has tipped her chalice …

The queen has tipped her chalice to my lips and her intoxicating contents run down my chest soaking my body in her scent

I have been anointed by the daughter of heaven and been named by her heir apparent to the kingdom of her for this moment

She is the mother of my lust and my tower topples under her toplessness only to rise again in anticipation of another impending confusion of tongues

And the babel of the workers as they rush in becomes a ritual song rising and descending without and within, above and below, solve et coagula

At her next touch I dissolve into nothing and then surge forth resolving into pure gold

She is an inspiration to greater and greater intention and the mystery of her religion is the secret sanctuary of my excess

Her dance inspires me to religion within the pylons of her temple and the hieroglyphics there in her inner precincts teach me all the secret spells necessary to survive another afterlife

I am her rememberer and she is my passage to the underworld, and we abide in the darkness lit by an inner light

My negative confession is nothing but stuttering and slips of the tongue in the shadows of her inner temple where the sacred waters are stored for the worthy worshippers to wash themselves

Going down in the dark, I am drowning in light

John Griogair Bell

 

The Hermetic Library arts and letters pool is a project to publish poetry, prose and art that is inspired by or manifests the Western Esoteric Tradition.

The Plymouth Brethren in Christian Sects in the Nineteenth Century

There’s a section which may be of interest on the Plymouth Brethren in Christian Sects in the Nineteenth Century by Caroline Frances Cornwallis, beginning on page 84, a work I noticed was added to Project Gutenberg last month.

The Plymouth Steps
The Plymouth Steps via jgbell

“the great feature of this sect, for so notwithstanding their protest, I must call these “Brethren,” is a degree of self approbation and uncharity for others, which, to say the least, is not what Christ taught. “No sect,” says Rust, “is more Sectarian, and none more separate from Christians of all denominations than “The Plymouth Brethren.” The Church of Rome they consider “bad.” The Church of England “bad.” “A popish priest and a parish priest, both bad;” “but infinitely worse,” says one of the Brethren (a Captain Hall), “is a people’s preacher.” They occasionally indulge in what they term “biting jests and sarcastic raillery,” of the ministers of our church, and of those who differ from them, which evince but little of the meek and peaceable spirit of the Gospel; for, as Lord Bacon has well observed, “to intermix Scripture with scurrility in one sentence;—the majesty of religion and the contempt and deformity of things ridiculous,—is a thing far from the reverence of a devout Christian, and hardly becoming the honest regard of a sober man.” If I have appeared to speak harshly of this sect, it is because they seem to me to have abandoned so much of the spirit of the Gospel. “If the tenets of the Plymouth Brethren be consistent with themselves,” observes Mr. Rust, “they necessarily withdraw them from all society, and every existing form of Christianity, shutting them out from all co-operation with the holy and benevolent, for the relief and blessing of their poor or sinful fellow creatures, making it sinful to fulfil the duties of a subject, a citizen, &c.” But I hope and believe that these tenets must be and are counteracted by the instinctive love of our kind, which for the benefit of the world God has implanted in man. The human race is so essentially social that they who endeavour to dissociate mankind, stand in much the same situation as he would do who should hope to dam up the ocean. It is in fact to these silent tendencies of human nature, whose force we never know till we attempt to check them, that we owe much of the innocuousness of false or overstrained opinions: the reason is deluded, but the feelings which the Creator has made a part of our very being, generally correct the false argument; and the man, if not previously corrupted by vice, acts right though he argues wrong.”

Of course, there’s quite a bit about the Plymouth Brethren in both Aleister Crowley’s Confessions and also in the introductory materials to The World’s Tragedy. You can find these doing a site search for “Plymouth Brethren“.

The Plymouth Steps
The Plymouth Steps via jgbell

Beth Kimbell has a new essay up on her site: Sexual Freedom, Spiritual Expression. This was featured in BiWomen, Summer 2011, Vol 29, No. 3.

“To pretend to be someone else, to restrict yourself from the natural expression of your love is true sin to us.” [via]

“‘Sin,’-a something tending to taint men’s actions for the worse, a principle of evil,-is wholly absent; and the words which we have above translated ‘Good’ and ‘Evil’ really mean ‘Skilful’ and ‘Unskilful’ respectively.”

The Law of Righteousness. By Ananda Maitriya. (Allan Bennett)

“‘Sin,’—a something tending to taint men’s actions for the worse, a principle of evil,—is wholly absent; and the words which we have above translated ‘Good’ and ‘Evil’ really mean ‘Skilful’ and ‘Unskilful’ respectively.” [via]

“there is no word which can accurately be translated as ‘Sin’ or ‘Evil,’ in the sense in which these words are generally understood in the religious systems of the West”

The Law of Righteousness. By Ananda Maitriya. (Allan Bennett)

“there is no word which can accurately be translated as ‘Sin’ or ‘Evil,’ in the sense in which these words are generally understood in the religious systems of the West” [via]