Tag Archives: Symbols

The Wine & The Will

The Wine and the Will: Rabelais’s Bacchic Christianity by Florence M Weinberg, the 1972 first edition hardcover from Wayne State University Press, is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

Florence M Weinberg The Wine & The Will from Wayne State University Press

“In a solid contribution to the field of French Renaissance literature, this study follows the trends of criticism initiated by the revolutionary discoveries of Glison, Febvre, and Screech, focusing on two major emblematic aspects of Rabelais’s novels. Using primary Renaissance iconological material, the author reconstructs the processes by which Renaissance authors (and Rabelais) coded their teachings in symbols that were both entertaining and useful to the learned reader of the time.

The author investigates two major Christian and humanistic aspects of Rabelais’s novels which were meant to test the ingenuity of a learned audience. She takes into account Hellenic and Hellenistic traditions of hermetism—numerology and symbolic iconology in their medieval and Renaissance transformations. The study is designed to show how Rabelais, a Renaissance humanist, fuses comic popular and pagan traditions to convey an evangelical Christian message. It reveals hidden meanings of episodes in Rabelais’s work previously dismissed as simply amusing, and conveys how humor and irony combined in ‘folly’ becomes the vehicle for wisdom.

The symbolism of the wine and the will, explored and understood in all its theological and humanistic complexity, deepens our understanding of Rabelais’s work and Renaissance thought in general.”

 

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Egyptian Magic in Egyptian Magic by Florence Farr.

“This was the highest work of magic, the Spiritual Alchemy or the Transmutation from human Force to Divine Potency. As is said by the great Iamblichus, in section iv., chapter ii., of The Mysteries:

‘The Priest who invokes is a man; but when he commands powers it is because through arcane symbols, he, in a certain respect, is invested with the sacred Form of the Gods.'” [via]

The archetype of Baphomet gets mentioned in a recent post by a conspiracy theorist in recovery

The archetype of Baphomet gets mentioned in a recent post by a conspiracy theorist in recovery at “How I Became a Conspiracy Theorist and Lived to Tell the Tale

 

“While skeptical that the world was really controlled by a clandestine network of shape-shifting reptilian creatures from the lower fourth dimension — as Icke apparently claimed — I couldn’t really figure out why the hell George Washington was posing like Baphomet.”

 

“Reptiles?”

“I don’t really believe that part.”

“So why do you believe the rest?”

“The symbols. You need to look at them. They’re everywhere.”

“If they’re so secret, why do they want to leave their mark on everything?”

“I’m not sure. Maybe I haven’t gotten to that part in the book yet.”

“Maybe you’re an idiot.”

“Maybe.”

The Deeper Symbolism of Freemasonry from The Meaning of Masonry by Walter Leslie Wilmshurst.

“It is well to emphasize then, at the outset, that Masonry is a sacramental system possessing, like all sacraments, an outward and visible side consisting; of its ceremonial, its doctrine and its symbols which we can see and hear, and an inward, intellectual, and spiritual side, which is concealed behind the ceremonial, the doctrine and the symbols, and which is available only to the Mason who has learned to use his spiritual imagination and who can appreciate the reality that lies behind the veil of outward symbol.” [via]