Tag Archives: symposium

Sexual Ambivalence

Sexual Ambivalence: Androgyny and Hermaphroditism in Graeco-Roman Antiquity by Luc Brisson, translated by Janet Lloyd, a 2002 paperback from University of California Press, is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

Luc Brisson Janet Lloyd Sexual Ambivalence from University of California Press

“This fascinating book collects and translates most of the extant Graeco-Roman writing on human beings, divinities, animals, and other creatures who were both female and male. Luc Brisson provides a commentary that situates this rich source material within its historical and intellectual contexts. These selections—from mythological, philosophical, historical, and anecdotal sources—describe cases of either simultaneous dual sexuality, as in androgyny and hermaphroditism, or successive dual sexuality, as in the case of Tiresias (the blind Theban prophet), which are found through the whole span of Graeco-Roman antiquity. Sexual Ambivalence is an invaluable sourcebook that gathers this suggestive, yet hard to find, material in one convenient place.

In addition to including such familiar sources as the myth of Salmacis and Hermaphroditus as told in Ovid’s Metamorphoses and Aristophanes’s myth of the origin of the sexes and sexuality in Plato’s Symposium, Brisson also discusses cosmogonic mythology in Hesiodic poetry, the Orphic Rhapsodies, Gnosticism, the Hermetic Corpus, and the so-called Chaldean Oracles. He presents the manifold variants of the myth of Tiresias, as well as many other sources.

These ancient stories deepen our awareness of how strongly the polarity of sexuality colors our entire perception of the world and are profoundly relevant to our thinking today.” — back cover


Forbidden Texts on the Western Frontier: The Christian Apocrypha in North American Perspectives at York University on Sep 26-28th, 2013

Forbidden Texts on the Western Frontier: The Christian Apocrypha in North American Perspectives” is the theme for the 2013 York Christian Apocrypha Symposium at York University, in Toronto, Ontario, Sep 26th-28th.

York Christian Apocrypha Symposium

“The 2013 York Christian Apocrypha Symposium, ‘Forbidden Texts on the Western Frontier: The Christian Apocrypha in North American Perspectives,’ will take place at York University September 26–28, 2013.

The event is organized by Tony Burke (York University) in consultation with Brent Landau (University of Oklahoma). It brings together 22 Canadian and U.S. scholars to share their work and discuss present and future collaborative projects.

The symposium is open to scholars, students, and interested members of the public; all may register for the event and take part in discussions. One of the goals of the symposium is to make the work of North American scholars on the Christian Apocrypha more widely known, not only to scholars in cognate disciplines (such as New Testament Studies or Medieval Studies) but also to students, who will be the future scholars in the discipline, as well as to the wider public who is interested in the texts but has been ill-informed about them through films, novels, and fringe scholarship.”

Hekate Symposium 2013 at Glastonbury on Jun 1st

Hekate Symposium 2013 will be held in Glastonbury, UK on Sat, Jun 1st, 2013.

Hekate Symposium Jun 1st 2013 at Glastonbury, UK

“Devotees, Priestesses, Priests and students of Her Mysteries from all around the country – and indeed the world – will gather for the second annual Hekate Symposium.”

“This is a unique one-day event which is entirely dedicated to the Goddess Hekate and her Mysteries, which will comprise scholarly presentations, ceremonies, meditations, pathworkings, chanting and ritual theatre throughout the day! Packed full of Hekatean delights from 10am – 10pm on Saturday, 1 June 2013. Facilitators and presenters this year include authors Sorita d’Este, Georgi Mishev, Emily Carding, Orryelle Defenestrate-Bascule, as well as Amelia Ounsted, Hazel, Sophia Kirke and numerous other Priestesses, Priests and Devotees giving their time, knowledge and talents to making this community event happen as an act of devotion.

This will be Georgi Mishev‘s first lecture in the UK, and those readers who enjoyed his work THRACIAN MAGIC will be particulary interested to know that he will be speaking on some of the material in the book, and leading a blessing ceremony in his native Bulgarian. Emily Carding (Cornwall) has – especially for this event – written a Ritual Drama, bringing together her knowledge and experience of working and studying Acting with that of her spiritual and ceremonial work to create something truly magical. The talks and lectures being given are all absolutely unique to this event. Many of the speakers at this years’ event are professionals and academics in their own fields, speaking exclusively at the Hekate Symposium about their work with the Goddess Hekate, driven by their passion for sharing knowledge and experience about Her Mysteries.” [via]

One month left for Summer Solstice 2013 Hermetic Library Journal submissions

There’s only one month until the March 21st, 2013 deadline to participate in the inaugural issue of the Hermetic Library Journal from the Benefit Anthology Project! Release is planned for June 21st, 2013. Consider letting others whom you think may be interested know about this as well, but more importantly consider submitting your written and visual work and the various sections for specific submissions. If you have any questions, comments or wish to contribute to this project; contact the librarian.

The Hermetic Library Journal is intended as a place for both practice and theory, not only informed by the other but with the intention of crossing thresholds between scholar and practitioner. The Journal offers a venue for art and culture that both informs and is informed by esotericism, which will bring the artist into the mix. The Journal is a community of intentional work from theoretic, practical and cultural perspectives that explores and relates to written and visual work about or inspired by esotericism and magick in the form of articles, essays, personal narratives, poetry, fiction, plays, artwork, sequential art, biographies, and more.

There are several sections to which you may be interested in submitting work:

· For general written and visual submissions, I will be accepting a wide and diverse range of materials, basically looking for work that is informed by or engages the living Western Esoteric Tradition, Hermeticism, Aleister Crowley’s Thelema and other subject matter at the library. You may also be interested in reading about the completely optional peer-review process, a way to get feedback on general submissions.

· Symposium, or forum, section is an opportunity for readers to write on a topic pre-selected for each issue, which for this issue is Intolerance and Tolerance.

· Kottabos, or letters, section for letters to the editor.

· Agora, or market, section is a place to provide goods and services of relevant interest that will reach the readership.

· Kerukeion, or announcements, section is a place for brief gratis community notices.

For general information, please read the call for submissions and the terms & conditions for submissions. If you have any comments, questions or concerns; or want to submit your work for an anthology, just contact the librarian.

Hermetic Library Journal submissions to the Symposium forum for Summer Solstice 2013

There’s only two months until the March 21st, 2013 deadline to participate in the inaugural issue of the Hermetic Library Journal from the Benefit Anthology Project! Release is planned for June 21st, 2013. Consider letting others whom you think may be interested know about this as well, but consider submitting your written and visual work. If you have any questions, comments or wish to contribute to this project; contact the librarian.

The Symposium is an opportunity for readers to write on a topic pre-selected for each issue, which for this issue is Intolerance and Tolerance. Non-fiction and personal narrative is encouraged, but a wide range of personal expression is possible. Submissions to the Symposium may be heavily edited but the creator will be contacted with proposed edits prior to publication, unless this is waived when submitted. Anonymity in publication is available, but not in the submission process, and the name used in publication may be presented in abbreviated or anonymous form at the discretion of the Journal. This is not an opportunity to slander, libel or flame others, so do not do so; and, where speaking of others, names should be changed and indicated to the Journal as such. Also, speak for yourself, your own thoughts and ideas.

The ancient Greek symposium was a social event where celebrants gathered to debate and revel in each other’s company, with various entertainments that included wine, women and song. The use of the word ‘symposium’ in English for events where speeches are made is not exactly what the original events were, but the rhetorical contests and dialogues that have come down to us in ancient Greek literature are the inspiration for that use. I propose something not quite so formal as a modern symposium, but not quite so wild as the ancient event.

Have you ever read the Sun magazine’s “readers write” section? If not, you should check out Snow, their recent theme January 2013 as an example. I’ve long wanted to do something like that, and here’s my chance. I am going to announce a more or less broad suggested theme for each issue of the journal and publish concise and thoughtful reader responses.

The Journal, in general, and this section, specifically, is intended to be a hospitable environment where no one ends up in hospital or therapy, including myself. I feel I must be clear this Symposium is not going to be a space to slander, libel, flame or otherwise attack people or points of view; but rather to offer readers an opportunity to offer personal thoughts and ideas about the specific topic selected.

The theme for this issue’s Symposium, a section of the Journal offering a reader’s forum, is Intolerance and Tolerance. Read more about the idea of the Symposium in the call for submissions and in the Symposium section of the submissions guidelines.

For general information, please read the call for submissions and the terms & conditions for submissions. If you have any comments, questions or concerns; or want to submit your work for an anthology, just contact the librarian.