Tag Archives: The Book of the Law

Aleister Crowley: New, Used and Rare Books and Ephemera

You may be interested in Weiser Antiquarian Book Catalogue #110: Aleister Crowley: New, Used and Rare Books and Ephemera. Including a Selection of Books from the Library of Wilfred T. Smith.

Weiser Antiquarian Book Catalogue #110 Aleister Crowley

“Welcome to the one hundred-and-tenth of our on-line catalogues, this being another of our specialised Aleister Crowley lists.

The catalogue begins with three interesting new releases: signed copies of Marlene Cornelius’ Liber AL Vel Legis: The Book of the Law. An Examination of Liber XXXI & Liber CCXX; and David Shoemaker’s Living Thelema: A Practical Guide to Attainment in Aleister Crowley’s System of Magick, and the always-interesting and beautifully produced AMeTh Lodge Journal. Vol. I, No. II from AMeTh Lodge of the O.T.O. in London. The next item is “Dark Halo,” a signed and numbered Limited Edition Print of a portrait of Aleister Crowley by California artist Heather McMillen, with an accompanying hand-written poetic “homage to Aleister Crowley” by Blair MacKenzie Blake, author of The Wickedest Books in the World and other works.

The third section of the catalogue is devoted to books and ephemera by Aleister Crowley himself. Amongst the rarities included are a copy of the Cambridge University magazine Granta which includes an anonymous poem by Crowley, a copy of the vellum bound first volume of The [Collected] Works of Aleister Crowley with an extraordinary double inscription, and Nicholas Bishop-Culpeper’s personal copy of Magick In Theory and Practice, beautifully bound in full vellum. There is also a group of four autograph letters, signed by Crowley; each is significant in its own way, with topics ranging from Crowley’s alleged share holdings in Australia, to a defense of Aubrey Beardsley! A selection of copies of The English Review, each with a contribution by Crowley, are followed by a varied group of books and journals that in one way or another relate to “the Beast.” Included amongst the journals are a copy of Esquire Magazine from March 1970 with a detailed and heavily illustrated series of essays on Californian occultism, that also reproduces a newsclipping concerning the famous “Solar Lodge” “Boy in the Box” debacle; a complete set of Sothis Magazine from the 1970s, a collection of the first seven issues of the Typhonian magazine Starfire; and 3 consecutive issues of Picture Post Magazine from 1955 which serialised a well-illustrated but breathless account of Crowley’s life. Amongst the books in the same section are a first edition of The Macedonians by Mary Butts, the English novelist and serious occult practitioner who spent some time at Cefalu with Crowley, the very uncommon first edition of Tiger-Woman by Betty May, in which she recounts her own time at Cefalu, and Nina Hamnett’s Laughing Torso, a book which eventually led Crowley into bankruptcy after he sued it’s publishers for libel, and failed.

A selection of the rather abstruse “Ming” booklets by one-time Crowley acolyte C. F. Russell is followed by the first three volumes of his also often-baffling Znuz is Znees, Memoirs of a Magician. A link, to a separate page, leads to listings for a collection of 26 books that were formerly in the library of Wilfred Talbot Smith (1885-1957), founder of “The Church of Thelema,” head of Agape Lodge of the O.T.O. in California, a long term associate of Aleister Crowley, and subject of Martin Starr’s biography The Unknown God. The collection includes a copy of the First US edition of Aleister Crowley’s Diary of a Drug Fiend, and copies of a number of works that Crowley is known to have recommended to his disciples, including The Canon; three books by Sydney T. Klein; the James Legge, translations of The Tao Teh King and The Yi King; etc. Some of the books have presentation or other inscriptions by well known people within the Thelemic community, including C. Stansfeld Jones; Frederic Mellinger; and Helen Parsons Smith. Most of the books are stamped with the personal lamen, with phallic design, of W.T. Smith, which he used as an ownership stamp, and a few also have his ownership signature. Included in the collection are several books that are quite scarce in their own right; notably the works by the obscure American alchemical author Delmar DeForest Bryant and the First Edition of the Pancham Sinh, translation of The Hatha Yoga Pradipika. Returning to the present page, the catalogue finishes with a group of copies of the Cincinnati Journal of Ceremonial Magick, a magazine published by a small Thelemic group in Ohio known as the Bate Cabal in the late 1970s and 80s.” [via]

You may be interested in a new post by Sabazius over on his blog about the Tunis Comment, or The Comment

You may be interested in a new post by Sabazius over on his blog about the Tunis Comment, or The Comment, at “A Brief Examination of ‘The Comment’“.

“These days, The Comment is sometimes regarded as a bit of irony, or an anachronism, or an example of ‘reverse psychology,’ or even a joke. But Crowley took this statement quite seriously, even if not perfectly literally.” [via]

“There is nothing wrong with studying Crowley’s evolving commentaries and writings dealing with Liber AL, such is encouraged by The Comment and was clearly the intent. But we know from experience that group discussion, especially in official contexts within a hierarchical organization, inevitably evokes the dynamic of intellectual leaders and followers, and subtle pressures to conform. O.T.O. is full of what might be considered operative paradoxes, and this is a significant one. We believe that by actively working to discourage the creation of social contexts in which individuals are expected to state their personal views on Liber AL and its meaning, we preserve their freedom.” [via]

Aleister Crowley: Prophet of the New Aeon at Treadwell’s, London, on Monday April 9th

“Aleister Crowley: Prophet of the New Aeon” is a full day presentations and readings related to the Book of the Law at Treadwell’s, London, on Monday April 9th, with proceeds going “to help preserve the Abbey of Thelema, Cefalu.” There’s been a bit about this around already, but here it is again in case you hadn’t seen it yet. Also check out the primary site for the event.

The c.n.p.o* for the Study of Self “Entelechy” presents:

ALEISTER CROWLEY: THE PROPHET OF THE NEW AEON
– A whole day of lectures relating to The Book of the Law –

To be held on Monday 9 April 2012 – at Treadwell’s, London.

The fantastic program includes:

Part I
11:00 Welcome

11:10 am – 11:35 am
The “Save the Abbey of Thelema” project by Anna Apostolidou, chairperson of the c.n.p.o. “Entelechy”

11:40 am – 12:05 pm
“Law, Truth & Desire: Crowley, Badiou & Lacan” by Katerina Kerasoti-Kay, D.Phil.

12:05 pm – 12:25 pm
Reading Liber Al, Chapter I by Caroline Wise

12:25 pm – 13:30 pm
Break

Part II
13:30 pm – 13:50 pm
“The Abbey must be built” by Peter Grey, owner of Scarlet Imprint Publications

13:50 pm – 14:10 pm
Reading Liber Al, Chapter II
by Paul Feazey

14:10 pm – 14:30 pm
“The Cult of Nuit: the star goddess of ancient Egypt, mother of Seth and all the gods.” by Mogg Morgan, owner of Mandrake of Oxford Publishing

14:30 pm – 14:40 pm
“Thelemic Geographica”
by Anna Apostolidou

14:40 pm – 15:00 pm
Break

Part III
15:00 pm – 15:20 pm
“Aleister Crowley: Prophet of a New Aeon, priest of Ancient Gods” by Paul Feazey, owner & editor of LAShTAL.COM

15:20 pm – 15:40 pm
Reading Liber Al, Chapter III by Peter Grey

15:40 pm – 16:10 pm
“Flashings of the Fire: Transmission of a Magical Current” by Michael Staley, Head of Ordo Typhonis (The Typhonian Order), and Founder of Starfire Publishing

16:10 pm – 16:30 pm
Discussion

Magick

 

Magick” by Klaxons from Myths Of The Near Future

“Magick, without tears
Magick, without tears
Magick, without tears
The magick-al veneer

The way to mother goose
The way to suck an egg
The way to golden dawn
The way to Koh Phangan

The glitter on the snow
the place to always go
Do what you will
Do what you will”

 

See Magick Without Tears, Book 4’s interlude on nursery rhymes, The Book of Lies chapter 69, the Golden Dawn Library Project, The Diary of a Drug Fiend (via Amazon), and, of course, The Book of the Law [also]

Aleister Crowley: The Fire and the Force on Kindle

You may be interested to hear that over the weekend Aleister Crowley: The Fire and the Force came out for the Kindle ebook reader. This book is an exploration of the work of Aleister Crowley by Don Webb published by Rûna-Raven Press.

“Aleister Crowley wrote many works himself, and many works have been written about him. Most of the latter focus on his colorful lifestyle, while others seek to interpret his meta-poetic words in terms of one or another Thelemite orthodoxy. In this volume Don Webb, former High Priest of the Temple of Set, goes beyond either of these approaches. Webb, who has himself made his way along the same arduous initiatory pathways pioneered by the First Beast, here focuses on the initiatory and philosophical meaning of Crowley’s life-work. He does so in a way that can be of personal magical benefit to all who read the book. The text of Webb’s book is divided into two sections: The first is made up of essays originally written for his inner students in the Temple of Set, the second part consists of new writings created exclusively for this book. Throughout Webb guides the reader in a fascinating initiatory journey along the Left Hand Path with ‘Uncle Al,’ like Vergil, at his side.”

Also, you may be curious about an upcoming work by Don Webb in which he’s writing a pestilential commentary to the Book of the Law. I’ll post more about that when I myself know more, but I hear that this new work will mention the Hermetic Library; so I’m certainly curious now if I wasn’t already!