Tag Archives: The Noonday Press

Character Analysis

Character Analysis by Wilhelm Reich, edited by Mary Boyd Higgins and Chester M Raphael, translated by Vincent R Carfagno, from The Noonday Press, is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

Wilhelm Reich Vincent Carfagno Character analysis from Noonday

“In 1933 Reich first published, in German, Charakteranalyse. A second, English, edition (1945) went further, adding the inevitable leap from depth psychology to biology predicted by Freud.

This third, enlarged edition includes all the previously published material as well as a new section expounding Reich’s later discoveries. It reveals how his study of character led to a comprehension of the biological basis of neuroses and finally to the discovery of the cosmic orgone energy. Thus, character analysis is taken out of the realm of psychology and put on the firm basis of natural science, in the form of orgone biophysics.” — back cover

Wilhelm Reich: Selected Writings

Selected Writings: An Introduction to Orgonomy by Wilhelm Reich, foreword by Mary Boyd Higgins, from The Noonday Press, is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

Wilhelm Reich Selected Writings from Noonday

“This anthology is not intended to replace any of the works of Wilhelm Reich, but rather to serve as an introduction to them. The chapters include material from The Function of the the Orgasm; The Cancer Biopathy; Character Analysis; Ether, God and Devil; Cosmic Superimposition and The Murder of Christ. In addition the volume reprints many important later articles from various journals.” — back cover

Listen, Little Man

Listen, Little Man! by Wilhelm Reich, translated by Theodore P Wolfe, illustrations by William Steig, from The Noonday Press, is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

Wilhelm Reich Listen, Little Man from Noonday

Listen, Little Man! tells of the inner storms and conflicts of a scientist and physician who watched, over decades, first na├»vely, then with amazement and finally with horror, what the Little Man does to himself; how he suffers and rebels, how he esteems his enemies and murders his friends; how, wherever he gains power as a ‘representative of the people,’ he misuses that power and makes it into something more cruel than the power which previously he had to suffer at the hands of individual sadists of the upper classes.” — back cover