Tag Archives: theatre

Aleister Crowley’s The Rite of Sol, a rock opera

Aleister Crowley’s The Rite of Sol, a rock opera is now available on DVD from Eleusyve Productions [also].

Aleister Crowley's Rite of Sol from Eleusyve Productions

Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law.

Eleusyve Productions is proud to announce the release of the fourth in its series of feature length musical adaptations of The Rites of Eleusis written by Aleister Crowley, the most important figure in the Western Occult Revival over the last 100 years. Eleusyve Productions is a theater group of actors, dancers and musicians based in Seattle, Washington, whose primary current purpose is the presentation of the seven plays comprising Aleister Crowley’s Rites of Eleusis (originally presented as a series in London in 1910) as modern musical theater pieces, using music, light, dance and drama to enhance the poetry and symmetry of the original works.

Aleister Crowley drew upon his deep knowledge of classical Greek arts and culture to produce these seven works (each centered upon one of the seven planets of antiquity) and intended them as a vehicle to entertain, instruct and to generate interest in the A∴A∴, his magickal teaching order. More than a century later, interest in Crowley’s occult knowledge and methods continues to grow, and the renewal of the Rites of Eleusis; their reworking in a modern rock opera format, staging and release on DVD and soundtrack CDs; has successfully brought these entertaining occult works into the 21st century.

Story synopsis: The Rite of Sol: a scene of post-conflict bliss is emerging following The Rite of Mars; a proud but precarious Utopia. Like a shadow cast by the brilliance of the Sun, however, something unseen moves beneath the glittering façade, haunting the devotees of the silent, ever-shining God.

Once again, the Rite of Sol features an outstanding cast of Seattle performers and musicians, including featured solos by Sunnie Larsen, with music composed by Jon Sewell and Melissa Holm. More information about all the completed Rites of Eleusis, with audio and video samples and purchase information available at the Eleusyve Productions website. We are very excited to present The Rite of Sol, a culmination of several years work, and the latest in an outstanding series.

Love is the law, love under will.

Jon Sewell
Eleusyve Productions

 

The Spirit of Tragedy

 

“The Spirit of Tragedy” from Aleister Crowley’s The Rite of Sol, a rock opera by Eleuyve Productions

“Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law.

This video is an artistic edit of “The Spirit of Tragedy” containing additional clips from Aleister Crowley’s The Rite of Sol, a rock opera as it was performed during November of 2012 in Seattle, WA at The Richard Hugo House.

The feature length DVD will be available from Eleusyve Production on March 8th, 2013.

For more information on this and other presentations, sound track recordings and full length DVDs visit us at eleusyve,com

Love is the law, love under will.” [via]

 

Excerpt from Aleister Crowley‘s The Rite of Sol:

Mortals never learn from stories
How catastrophé becomes;
How above the victor’s glories
In the trumpets and the drums
And the cry of millions “Master!”
Looms the shadow of disaster.
Every hour a man hath said:
“That at least is scotched and dead.”
Some one circumstance; “At last
That, and it effects, are past.”
Some one terror—subtle foe!
“I have laid that spectre low.”
They know not, learn not, cannot calculate
How subtly Fate
Weaves its fine mesh, perceiving how to wait;
Or how accumulate
The trifles that shall make it master yet
Of the strong soul that bade itself forget. [via]

What’s Wrong with the Movies? by Aleister Crowley in Vanity Fair, Jul 1917.

“And so, alas, it all came about.

These two master minds could not foresee that everyone who had read Hugo’s great story would leave the theatre foaming at the mouth, raving for blood.

Similarly with ‘Hedda Gabler.’ They had to improve on Ibsen’s great curtain, and bring in George Tesman to confront Brack, who faints on hearing the pistol shot, and asks, ‘Why should you faint at my wife’s death?’ with all the air of one who proposes an amusing riddle!” [via]

Aleister Crowley is acknowledged as one of the Earth’s historic alchemists in an article about acting

Aleister Crowley is acknowledged as one of the Earth’s historic alchemists in an article about acting at “Nicolas Cage: alchemist and shaman?” by DJ Pangburn. I suppose it’s novel that Crowley is being called out as an alchemist, in a positive light. (The snide comment I want to make is, “why the prejudice against alchemists from other planets?” But, I won’t stoop … Oops.)

 

“Earth’s history is rich with alchemists—Albertus Magnus, Hermes Trismegistus, Nicolas Flamel, Isaac Newton, Aleister Crowley, Alejandro Jodorowsky, Paracelsus, John Dee, Terrence McKenna and even Carl Jung. Alchemy was a proto-science that paved the way for modern science (chemistry, modern medicine, physics) but also had a spiritual, shamanistic aspect.

This is not to say that alchemists and shamans were and are officially coterminous, only that they both aspire to a better understanding of existence through various means: mysticism, magic, study, and drugs (which we know shamans have done, though whether Alchemists ever did is uncertain. In fact, McKenna attempted to synthesize alchemy with shamanism in various lectures, and described alchemists as pursuing a ‘magical theory of nature’ (like Shamans) in the film ‘The Alchemical Dream.'”

 

“Ghost Rider was an entirely new experience, and he got me thinking about something I read in a book called The Way Of Wyrd by Brian Bates, and he also wrote a book called The Way Of The Actor. He put forth the concept that all actors, whether they know it or not, stem from thousands of years ago — pre-Christian times — when they were the medicine men or shamans of the village. And these shamans, who by today’s standards would be considered psychotic, were actually going into flights of the imagination and locating answers to problems within the village. They would use masks or rocks or some sort of magical object that had power to it.

It occurred to me, because I was doing a character as far out of our reference point as the spirit of vengeance, I could use these techniques. I would paint my face with black and white make up to look like a Afro-Caribbean icon called Baron Samedi, or an Afro-New Orleans icon who is also called Baron Saturday. He is a spirit of death but he loves children; he’s very lustful, so he’s a conflict in forces. And I would put black contact lenses in my eyes so that you could see no white and no pupil, so I would look more like a skull or a white shark on attack.

On my costume, my leather jacket, I would sew in ancient, thousands-of-years-old Egyptian relics, and gather bits of tourmaline and onyx and would stuff them in my pockets to gather these energies together and shock my imagination into believing that I was augmented in some way by them, or in contact with ancient ghosts. I would walk on the set looking like this, loaded with all these magical trinkets, and I wouldn’t say a word to my co-stars or crew or directors. I saw the fear in their eyes, and it was like oxygen to a forest fire. I believed I was the Ghost Rider.”

 

I’m not convinced that “alchemical” is the way to describe the technique Cage uses, but it sure does sound like a magickal aspect of theatre, and related to aspecting and similar techniques from the more ecstatic traditions, modern and historic, but also the idea of assuming a Godform in more ceremonial rituals. Of course, that also brings me to think about one of the quotes from Florence Farr posted last week, actually Iamblichus quoted by Farr, “The Priest who invokes is a man; but when he commands powers it is because through arcane symbols, he, in a certain respect, is invested with the sacred Form of the Gods” [via]

Crowley: The Vehement Appetite of the Beast at Eclectic Company near Los Angeles on Feb 6 at 8pm

Crowley: The Vehement Appetite of the Beast, by E. R. Clark, is apparently a new musical with lyrics based on the poetry of Aleister Crowley. If you’re in the Los Angeles area, there’s a rehearsed reading of this going up for one night only on Mon, Feb 6 at 8pm at the Eclectic Company Theatre.

Crowley: The Vehement Appetite of the Beast Rehearsed reading of a new musical. Book and music by E.R. Clark. Lyrics from the poems of Aleister Crowley. Mon., Feb. 6, 8 p.m. Eclectic Company Theatre, 5312 Laurel Canyon Blvd., Valley Village, 818-508-3003, www.eclecticcompanytheatre.org.” [via]

I don’t see anything about this on the Eclectic Company Theatre site, so maybe give them a call. And, if you go, send me a review to publish!

The Bacchae: A Ceremonial Nightmare

 

“There is so much to celebrate!”

 

“Are you so blinded by blood and wine? … Open your eyes and see what you have done!”

 

“From the Delta Drama production of The Bacchae: A Ceremonial Nightmare. Directed by Harvey T. Jordan.” [via]

The Bacchae

 

“A National Theatre of Scotland production.

Alan Cumming gives an award-winning, tour-de-force central performance as Dionysus, the charismatic and dangerous god in this adaptation of Euripidese classic tragedy.

His chorus of Bacchae are a high-octane line-up of scarlet-clad, soulful female singers.” [via], see]