Tag Archives: time

The Mysteries

The Mysteries: Papers from the Eranos Yearbooks, edited by Joseph Campbell, the 1990 fifth paperback printing of Bollingen Series XXX Vol 2 from Princeton University Press, is part of the collection at the Reading Room.

Joseph Campbell The Mysteries from Princeton University Press / Bollingen

“Since 1933, the Eranos Conferences have been held at Ascona in southern Switzerland. Distinguished scholars from Europe, Asia, and America have been invited to a ‘shared feast’ (eranos) and have lectured on themes chosen by the Director of Eranos, the late Olga Froebe-Kapteyn. The lectures originally appeared in the Eranos-Jahrbücher (Zurich) and selections translated into English have been published in Papers from the Eranos Yearbooks, of which this is the second volume. Thirteen scholars—including C. G. Jung, C. Kerényi, Walter F. Otto, and Hugo Rahner—are represented in this collection, which is drawn from the years 1936, 1939m 1940–41, 1942, and 1944. The volume is edited by Joseph Campbell and translated by Ralph Manheim and R.F.C. Hull.” — back cover

Essays included are:

  • Paul Masson-Oursel, “The Indian Theories of Redemption in the Frame of the Religions of Salvation”
  • Paul Masson-Oursel, “The Doctrine of Grace in the Religious Thought of India”
  • Walter F. Otto, “The Meaning of the Eleusinian Mysteries”
  • Carl Kerényi, “The Mysteries of the Kabeiroi”
  • Walter Wili, “The Orphic Mysteries and the Greek Spirit”
  • Paul Schmitt, “The Ancient Mysteries in the Society of Their Time, Their Transformation and Most Recent Echoes”
  • Georges Nagel, “The ‘Mysteries’ of Osiris in Ancient Egypt”
  • Jean de Manasce, “The Mysteries and the Religion of Iran”
  • Fritz Meier, “The Mystery of the Ka’ba: Symbol and Reality in Islamic Mysticism”
  • Max Pulver, “Jesus’ Round Dance and Crucifixion According to the Acts of St. John”
  • Hans Leisegang, “The Mystery of the Serpent”
  • Julius Baum, “Symbolic Representations of the Eucharist”
  • C G Jung, “Transformation Symbolism in the Mass”
  • Hugo Rahner, “The Christian Mystery and the Pagan Mysteries.”


The Testament of Cyprian the Mage book launch at The Atlantis Bookshop on Mar 1st at 7pm

The Testament of Cyprian the Mage book launch for the new volume from Jake Stratton-Kent and Scarlet Imprint at The Atlantis Bookshop on March 1st, 2014 at 7pm may be of interest.

The Testament of Cyprian the Mage is a two-volume work by Jake Stratton-Kent, comprehending The Book of Saint Cyprian and his Magical Elements and an elucidation of The Testament of Solomon. It is approximately 600 pages endowed with charts, tables and seals and is punctuated by specially commissioned pen and ink illustrations by Oliver Liebeskind.

This work draws upon these texts to create a clear understanding of the practice of grimoire magic, not as a discrete or degenerate subset of ceremonial magic, but one which is integrated with folk magic and witchcraft. In particular we discover a shared dramatis personae, the infernal pact, and a common terrain of Wild Hunt and Sabbat.

Within the text we encounter the Chiefs, Kings and Queens of the grimoire tradition; the magical role of the Decans and their stones and plants; lunar magic and magical animals; the gods of Time; the Sibyl and the Hygromanteia; Asmodeus and Oriens; Angelology, Theurgy, Conjunction and the Pact, the Angelic Vice-regent and thwarting Angels; Asclepius, Iamblichus and Neo-Platonism; Paracelsus and the Elemental Spirits; Necromancy, and the principles of spell work.”

“We will be celebrating the launch at The Atlantis Bookshop on Saturday 1st March and you are most welcome to attend. Please RSVP to this email if you are able to join us. If you cannot attend, but would like an Inscribed copy, please drop us a line and we will happily arrange that for you.”

I.NSIT N.ATURAE R.EGINA I.SIS

ALL the hot summer I lay in the darkness,

Calling on the winds to pass by me and slay me,

Slay me with light in the heat of the summer;

But the winds had no answer for one who was fallen

Asleep by the wayside, with no lyre to charm them,

No voice of the lyre, and no song to charm them.

 

Late as I lay there asleep by the wayside,

I heard a voice call to me, low in the silence,

There in the darkness the summer called to me:

“thou who art hidden in the green silence,

Let a time of quietness come now upon thee.

Lay thine head on the earth and slumber on her bosom:

Time and the gods shall pass darkling before thee.”

There in the silence I lay, and I heeded

The slow voice that called me, the grave hand that beckoned,

That beckoned me on through the hall of the silence.

 

There in the silence there was a green goddess,

Folden her wings, and her hands dumbly folden,

Laying in her lay, as though asleep in the darkness.

 

Then did I hail her: “O mother, my mother,

Syren of the silence, dumb voice of the darkness,

How shall I have speech of Thee, who know not Thy speaking?

How shall I behold Thee, who art hidden in the darkness?

Lo! I bend mine eyes before Thee, and no sign dost Thou vouchsafe me;

I whisper love-words before Thee, and I know not if Thou hear me,

Thou who art the darling of the Night and of the Silence;

Yellow art Thou as the sunlight through the corn-fields,

Bright as the sun-dawn on the snow-clad mountains,

Slow as the voice of the great green gliding River.

Calmly in Thy silence am I come to rest me,

Now from the world the light hath slowly faded;

I have left the groves of Pan that I might gaze upon Thee,

Gaze upon the Virgin that before Time was begotten,

Mother of Chronos, and the old gods before him,

Child of the womb of the Silence, whose father

Is the unknown breath of the most secret Goddess,

Whose name whoso hath heard is smitten to madness.

 

“Now do I come before Thee in Thy temple,

With offerings from the oak-woods and the breath of the water

That girds the earth with a girdle of green starlight;

And all the austerity of the brooding summer,

And all the wonder of the starlit spaces

That stare down awesomely upon the lonely marshes,

And the bogs with sucking lips, and the pools that charm the wanderer

Till he forgets the world, and rushes to sleep upon them.”

 

And still there was silence, and the voice of the world swept by me,

Making in mine ears the noise of tumbling waters;

But two voices I heard, and they spake one to the other:

“Who stands with downcast eyes in the temple of our Lady?”

And the answer: “A wanderer from the world who hath sought the halls of silence;

Yet knoweth he not the Bride of the Darkness,

Her of the sable wings, and eyes of terrible blindness

That see through the worlds and find nothing and nothing,

Who would smite the worlds to peace, save that so she would perish,

And cannot, for that she is a goddess silent and immortal,

Utterly immortal in the gods’ eternal darkness.”

 

And the first voice cried: “Oh, that we might perish,

And become as pearls of blackness on the breast of the silence,

Lending the waste places of the world our darkness,

That the vision might burst in the brain of the seer,

And we be formed anew, and reborn in the light world.”

 

But the other voice was silent, and the noise of waters swept me

Back into the world, and I lay asleep on a hill-side.

Bearing for evermore the heart of a goddess,

And the brain of a man, and the wings of the morning

Clipped by the shears of the silence; so must I wander lonely,

Nor know of the light till I enter into the darkness.

 

OMNIA VINCAM (Victor B Neuburg), Equinox I iv

(Obtained in invocation, June 9–10, 1910 O.S.)

 

The Hermetic Library arts and letters pool is a project to publish poetry, prose and art that is inspired by or manifests the Western Esoteric Tradition. If you would like to submit your work for consideration as part of the Arts and Letters pool, contact the librarian.

Concerning Death by Aleister Crowley in International, Dec 1917.

“Time that eateth his children hath not power on them that would not be children of Time. To them that know themselves immortal, that dwell always in eternity, conscious of Nuit, throned upon the chariot of the sun, there is no death that men call death.” [via]

In Nomine Babalon, XX

XX

Time ticking on like the hands of a clock

Calls forth the god with the head of a hawk!

The aeon of fire will rain down upon;

I raise up the cup and adore Babalon!

In Nomine Babalon: 156 Adorations to the Scarlet Goddess

 

The Hermetic Library arts and letters pool is a project to publish poetry, prose and art that is inspired by or manifests the Western Esoteric Tradition.

Egyptian Magic in Egyptian Magic by Florence Farr.

“This is the Triumphant Death-Song of the Initiated Egyptian. To Him the Life beyond the grave—the abodes of the West—opened a wider range of activity. To him Initiation meant the hastening of the Time of Ripened Power when he might become One with the Great God of Humanity, Osiris; slain that he might rise again, perfected through suffering, glorified through humiliation.” [via]