Tag Archives: Warren Ellis

From the Dead

Hermetic Library Fellow T Polyphilus reviews Moon Knight, Vol 1: From the Dead by Warren Ellis, Declan Shalvey, &al.

I hadn’t read any Warren Ellis comics for a while when I heard about the collections of his work on the Marvel superhero title Moon Knight. From the Dead reprints the first six issues of the new series, which is a continuation rather than a reboot of earlier treatments of the character. I haven’t read much of those erstwhile books, and not for a long while, so I didn’t make comparisons while reading, and didn’t benefit from any coy allusions to earlier storylines.

“Mr. Knight” is declared to have been insane, and it’s an open question as to how much sanity he has recovered. His operation in these stories is very “Batman”: nocturnal urban vigilante with high-tech accessories. The thing that’s most un-Batman is his attire. Where Batman favors dark togs, Moon Knight wears all white in any of his several costumes (old-fashioned cape and cowl, three-piece-suit and full-head mask, or avian pseudo-mummy). This attire is suitably surprising, and when his foes ask, “Who the hell are you?” he answers, “The one you see coming.”

As usual, Ellis’s pacing and efficient use of dialogue are exquisite. Declan Shalvey’s drawings are a good match for the content, in both gritty scenes of violence and episodes of eerie communion with the moon-god Khonsu. The book favors wide, short panels extending across the page and marching down it, giving a recurrent feeling of sinking or falling.

My favorite of the issues collected here is the fourth, “Sleep.” It puts Moon Knight in his role of “watcher of overnight travelers” to investigate mishaps at a sleep clinic. The psychedelic fugue of the inquiry is shown in day-glo page compositions that contrast shockingly with the rest of the book, and reminded me of some of the most far-out sequences in The Invisibles or 1970s Doctor Strange.

It was worth my while to borrow this one from the public library. [via]

Aetheric Mechanics

Hermetic Library Fellow T Polyphilus reviews Aetheric Mechanics by Warren Ellis.

Ellis tells a tidy little story here, reminiscent of the work he used to do on Planetary, but without the attraction of continuing characters. Pagliarani’s black-and-white art is full of detail, with a limited variation in line weight, which makes it slow to take in; but it suits the mood and subject-matter of the piece, set in a “1907 London” of antigravity airships, videolinks, and war with Ruritania. Ellis’ usual talent for dialogue is evident in the Edwardian banter. Ostensibly a murder mystery, the story eventually becomes something else. [via]

Freakangels, Vol 6

Hermetic Library fellow T Polyphilus reviews Freakangels, Vol. 6 by Warren Ellis and Paul Duffield.

Warren Ellis Paul Duffield Freakangels Vol 6

This collection concludes the FreakAngels series in what seems retrospectively to be the only possible way. Warren writes what he has to, pretty entertainingly, and Duffield’s art is in fine form. The adoptive FreakAngel steward Alice becomes absolutely key to the story, while the mutants themselves are sequestered in a basement areopagus.

The whole series is an excellent coming-of-age science fiction story for a mature readership. [via]

Nemo

Hermetic Library fellow T Polyphilus reviews Nemo: Heart of Ice (League of Extraordinary Gentlemen) by Alan Moore and Kevin O’Neill from Top Shelf Productions:

Alan Moore and Kevin O'Neill's Nemo from Top Shelf Productions

 

I was reminded once or twice while reading this book that Warren Ellis’s Planetary is a more effective 20th-century version of Alan Moore’s 19th-century League of Extraordinary Gentlemen than the latter’s own actual later League books are. Still, I enjoyed Nemo: Heart of Ice. It’s a beautiful hardcover on heavy stock at the price you might pay for a small trade-paper collected volume. The colors are especially beautiful, bringing out O’Neill’s art to great effect.

The story is both a sequel to Verne’s 20,000 Leagues under the Sea (with Nemo’s daughter Janni as the captain of the Nautilus, as established elsewhere in the League continuity) and a prequel to Lovecraft’s At the Mountains of Madness, all wrapped up in “science hero” competition and animosity. It’s a quick but enjoyable read, and makes a curious little annex to the sprawling series by Moore and O’Neill. [via]

 

 

The Hermetic Library Reading Room is an imaginary and speculative future reification of the library in the physical world, a place to experience a cabinet of curiosities offering a confabulation of curation, context and community that engages, archives and encourages a living Western Esoteric Tradition. If you would like to contribute to the Hermetic Library Reading Room, consider supporting the library or contact the librarian.

Freakangels, Vol 5

Hermetic Library fellow T Polyphilus reviews Freakangels, Vol 5 by Warren Ellis and Paul Duffield, from Avatar Press:

Warren Ellis and Paul Duffield's Freakangels, Vol 5 from Avatar Press

 

The story continues to develop interestingly in this volume of FreakAngels, and there’s a little breather from the violence in the earlier parts. The emphasis here is on the FreakAngels’ further exploration of their psychic potential, and a certain amount of reconciliation from their earlier conflicts.

Some of Duffield’s art seems a little rushed by comparison to what has come before–some of the figures are a little out of shape. [via]

 

 

The Hermetic Library Reading Room is an imaginary and speculative future reification of the library in the physical world, a place to experience a cabinet of curiosities offering a confabulation of curation, context and community that engages, archives and encourages a living Western Esoteric Tradition. If you would like to contribute to the Hermetic Library Reading Room, consider supporting the library or contact the librarian.